Representing communities: developing the creative power of people to improve health and well-being

Lead Research Organisation: Cardiff University
Department Name: Sch of Social Sciences

Abstract

The overarching aim of this project is to explore how community representations produced through creative arts practices (e.g. storytelling, performance, visual art) can be used as forms of evidence to inform health-related policy and service developments. Policies for health improvement tend to focus either on the impact of poverty and deprivation - but with little thought given to historical and cultural context or the experiences of living in these circumstances - or on the prevalence of 'unhealthy behaviours', with limited attempts to connect these with meaningful ways of life. However, research evidence indicates the need for studies that explore the experiences of people living in deprivation and isolation and find ways to improve dialogue between communities themselves and health policy makers. This study will develop methods for using creative art forms as a mode of communication and knowledge exchange. Through analysis of existing representations of disadvantaged and stigmatised communities in literature, film, etc, and the production of new community self-representations in arts-based workshops, it will explore the relationship between 'official' representations of community health and well-being (e.g. in statistical data) and how communities understand and present their own health and well-being. There will be a focus on the accumulated assets and resources that allow individuals and communities to cope with and navigate real and perceived structural barriers, and on the possibilities of resilience to upheaval, resistance to reputational damage, and the alternative representations that these can stimulate.

The project will take place across five distinct case-study communities in Wales, Scotland and England and connect these to relevant policy makers, researchers and arts practitioners in each country. Our understanding of community is informed by a 'relational' view of place which conceptualises community as more of a process than an entity. Although we define communities in terms of spaces that are shared, we fully recognise that the meaning of those spaces will not necessarily be shared. The project will consider how perceptions and experiences of community vary across time and changing circumstances, and how communities and the people living in them are represented in relation to key differences and divisions relating to gender, class, ethnicity and age.

Following an inventory and analysis of existing representations of each community, both artistic (e.g. in literature) and 'formal' (e.g. in deprivation indices), each case study will use creative engagement methods (including life mapping, drama, storytelling, and photography) to generate new community self-representations, working in partnership with local arts and health organisations. The engagement process will be documented in ways that allow all participants, though diaries, blogs, or digital soap boxes, to reflect on the process and the dynamics of engagement. In all case studies the final creative representations themselves will be co-authored by the community participants and they will have the final decision on how their own accounts are presented. These new 'data' will be presented to relevant local or national policy makers and service development officials through exhibitions, performances, and digital media. The researchers will evaluate this process, reflecting on the relationship between arts participation and community empowerment, and will examine how community values, participation, self-reliance and resilience are shaped, experienced and articulated, and can ultimately become embedded into policy. Through its rigorous analysis, its development of arts-based research methods, and its conviction that literature and the arts form a valid form of 'evidence' in policy discussions, the research will offer innovative thinking about, and will make a distinctive contribution to, the study and development of 'community health and well-being'.

Planned Impact

Who will benefit from the research?
National and regional partners and end-users in the three represented countries will benefit. These beneficiaries are over and above the Academic Beneficiaries described elsewhere. In Wales, policy makers and service providers in Public Health Wales, Local Health Boards, Communities First (Welsh Government), the Wales Council for Voluntary Action and the Welsh Local Government Association stand to benefit. In Scotland, the Chief Medical Officer (CMO) at the Scottish Government, Local NHS Boards in Greater Glasgow and Clyde and Highland and Glasgow Life (organisation responsible for culture and sport) are anticipated beneficiaries. In England, Local Clinical Commissioning Groups, NHS Commissioning Board, Birmingham Health and Well-Being Board, local and national Health Watch organisations and Public Health England are identified pathways to knowledge transfer. Through applying the best principles of community engagement and participatory practice, individuals and communities taking part in the research will also benefit.

How will they benefit?
Individual and communities: All case studies are predicated on the principles of community engagement and participation, as outlined by the Scottish Executive guidelines (2005), to strengthen the likelihood that the experience of participation will be enabling and empowering. Specifically, they aim to provide participants with a voice to express community concerns and mechanisms for influencing decisions and resource allocation within these communities. There is evidence indicating health and well-being benefits of arts participation at both individual and community levels. The cultural impact of communities being able to re-imagine and reclaim stories about their history is a cross-cutting aim. Outputs in the form of artistic production and curating of existing resources will act as a permanent legacy. The research team will identify, in consultation with communities and other partners, suitable geographical and virtual venues for archiving these.
Public and Third Sector beneficiaries: The process evaluations of the case studies will enable service commissioners to gain insight into the lived realities of the communities they serve. For example, Communities First in Wales, a national regeneration programme, has an emphasis on community leadership and engagement as a mechanism for change. Health is one of three strategic outcomes. This research will also provide evidence to support the programme in both engaging communities and understanding the impact of interventions on health and well-being. A similar conversation over what counts as evidence is taking place in Scotland. The CMO for Scotland has a core responsibility to reduce health
inequalities through cross-sector work on the social determinant of health. The 2010 Annual Report of the CMO (Scotland) highlighted the limits of traditional strategies and measurement of salutogenic processes, the factors which create health for individuals and communities. The outputs from the proposed work will support the CMO's task in identifying appropriate forms of evidence, and also NHS boards in the Greater Glasgow and Highland regions, as they respond to the CMO's lead in mainstreaming assets based approaches. More broadly, the work will provide insight and solid examples of culturally acceptable modes of engagement and participation through the arts in populations who experience barriers to arts participation. This will be of benefit to cultural partners in the three countries and health delivery partners wishing to engage with communities they describe as 'hard to reach'.

Reference group
Each country will establish reference groups of critical friends from our partner organisations in academia, creative industries, policy and local communities. They will provide conduits of knowledge mobilisation as well as additional expertise in the practice and/or study of cultural representations.

Organisations

 
Title 'Opening Thoughts: Representing Cromarty' 
Description This is a 47 minute video which introduces the project for local and academic audiences. It serves as a form of literature review and a sampling of relevant archive and historical materials. The full list of sources are listed at the end of the video. The artistic approach enables us to tackle difficult topics like suicide, mental health and domestic violence without compromising any individual's vulnerability. This work also established a socio-economic context for contemporary efforts. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2014 
Impact An excellent means of opening conversations and generating solid partnership for co-production on health and wellbeing. An experiment in non textual means of analysis and synthesis of large sets of different kinds of literature and visual materials. 
URL http://vimeo.com/108412940
 
Title A Journey So Far: (Re) Presenting the African -Caribbean Elders Society 
Description The film explores the journey of engagement and (re) presentation with a group of female Elders who attend a the African -Caribbean Elders Society (ACES). 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2014 
Impact The film explores the journey of engagement and (re) presentation with a group of female Elders who attend a the African -Caribbean Elders Society (ACES). The aim is to provide footage that hopefully captures some of the nuances of engagement and also explore the shift from engagement to (re)presentation as it unfolds. 
 
Title A Journey so Far: Caribbeans in Butetown 
Description Representing Butetown: The Caribbean Elders Project aimed to explore personal and collective histories of the Caribbean migratory experience, and to what extent they shape the everyday lives, health and well-being of Caribbean elders. The launch event was held 1st July 2014, in collaboration with the National Theatre Wales (NTW). The NTW Assembly model is rooted in a performance debate that responds to a local issue in a creative setting. It can be described further as a community-led dramatic experience that nurtures an exploration of one or several issues important to the local community; space is left during the performance for the audience to debate and react. 
Type Of Art Performance (Music, Dance, Drama, etc) 
Year Produced 2014 
Impact Celebrate the historical and contemporary links and emotional ties people have/ have had to key places in Butetown (the churches, centres, pubs and streets); Open up space for Caribbean migrants to reflect on the role key places and activities in Butetown may have on their lives when they arrived and settled in Cardiff Give people space to share what 'Butetown' means to them today. 
 
Title Butetown Carnival Memories (documentary) 
Description Documentary film commission produced by our community partners 15th Floor productions looking at the history of carnival in Butetown. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact Learning about the Community Archive Screening provided opportunity for Community to see itself and for others to share glimpses of that history. Positive reminiscence Visibility Networking 
 
Title Butetown Carnival Memories Exhibition 
Description An Exhibition of photographs documenting the Butetown Carnival in 70's and 80's Cardiff 
Type Of Art Artistic/Creative Exhibition 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact Fostering positive community feeling Pride in community identity and heritage 
 
Title Campfire Conversation: Nature Works - Local Fiction & Other Stories 
Description Coorie round the campfire for readings from female fiction writers of the locality. Listen to some Cromarty Dreamers. Bring a poem or dream of your own to share - or just chill and listen to stories in the spring(ish!) gloaming. Sizzling sausages & toasted marshmallows provided. Please wrap up warmly & bring a beverage of your choice & a festie chair, or make yourself comfortable on the beach. Issie is using the 'Nature Works' term to refer to a range of outdoor, or outdoors inspired participatory perfomance based micro-events, which derive from her work on rural fiction and begin to be rolled out in Cromarty, and then beyond the study area, from March 2017 onwards. 
Type Of Art Performance (Music, Dance, Drama, etc) 
Year Produced 2017 
Impact Enables discussion of rural mental wellness issues through the medium of readings from local, and not so local, authors. Fully participatory format, like a ceilidh or music 'session' - attendees supported and encouraged to tell or read theri own stories. Key elements videod and shared through Campfire Convention. 
 
Title Cardiff Story Exhibition 
Description Exhibition of the work we have been doing with different Groups of Caribbean Elders, summarising key themes and processes. 
Type Of Art Artistic/Creative Exhibition 
Year Produced 2016 
Impact New visibility as people outside of familiar circles engage with the project 
 
Title Celebrate Exhibition 
Description Using the Representing Communities project as a model, Natalie McFadyen White of Impact Arts led on a successful bid for £8409 from the Big Lottery to fund a project that explored, though artistic expression, the experience of living in Dennistoun in 2014. The three events of 2014 that this work would pivot around were the centenary of World War 1, the Scottish Referendum, and the Commonwealth Games. Glasgow played a central role in these activities and, as an offshoot of our work on how communities are represented (and may represent themselves through art), Dennistoun was an opportune test site for the work. Artists (James Gow and Emma Nutland), film maker (Basharat Khan) and creative writer (Eleanor Thom) were employed to capture experiences and help to facilitate community members' vision of their experience of living in Dennistoun in 2014. Reflections were sought on what 2014 had meant to them, as well as descriptions of how things had changed in the last 12 months. Films (available to view via https://vimeo.com/127211882 password: weave) 
Type Of Art Artistic/Creative Exhibition 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact This exhibition helped establish a presnence for the engagemetn activity associated with Representing Dennistoun (as part of Representing Communities) 
URL http://www.impactarts.co.uk/gallery/celebrate-exhibition-/879/
 
Title Creating Representations: The Lens 
Description Video interviews with photographers who have made Butetown (her land and her people), a focus in their work. This activity considered the visual representations of Butetown produced by photographers who were born and raised in Butetown, and those who came from further afield, exploring how, through their work emerges a sense of how a place is experienced and 'lived in'. Charged with ideas of photojournalist versus artist, these conversations considered some of the artists' preoccupations - their approach and specific methods that underpin how they seek to capture and represent their subject. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact Celebrating the work of some of the photographers who have contributed to existing representations of this culturally rich community that will in time be seen as historical documents. 
URL https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B66sXcZHi5wIRkFkT2dmQ01HLVk/view?usp=sharing
 
Title Creative Tapestry using a variety of embroidery, arts and crafts based methods 
Description Pakistani women took part in 15 weekly sessions, learning new skills with trained facilitators and sharing existing skills. The women over the weeks created a series of arts pieces which were collectively created in a piece of embroidered art work entitled The Tapestry. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact The understanding that there are a range of skills that exist within the community. Taking part in a creative session was empowering for women and provided a safe space to engage with each other. Taking part in the creation of the session resulted in much needed time out for women. Provided a deep understanding of the women's everyday lived lives. 
 
Title Cromarty DreamING 
Description The entire exhibition and Drop In activities format, available for 2 weeks in late June, was designed to enable on-the-spot co-creation of key findings by attendees, and evaluation of the full project, and Cromarty Dreaming elements through means informed by The Visual Matrix Method. Participation included drop ins off the street, NHS Highland staff, High Life Highland staff, Highland Children's Forum staff, all of Cromarty Primary School, Cromarty Care carers and Board members, Dementia Friendly Highland representative, Fourways Club volunteers and members, Cromarty Youth Café volunteers and youngsters, Cromarty History Society, West Church members and many other local residents. 
Type Of Art Artistic/Creative Exhibition 
Year Produced 2016 
Impact This process helped to clarify some headline themes in representation of Cromarty. These were expressed through the creation of wall panels, made by Issie MacPhail, using graffiti paint to mist suitable scenes, using stencils created on the spot or local plants, as stencils. This simple, low cost technique for creating 6 core wall panels (c 2.5 m x 3m each), plus 3 supplementary mobile panels on wheels, was chosen to ensure that this embodied form of analysis could be easily replicated in the future, without high costs or professional artist involvement. The process of analysis is described here as embodied because the panels started out blank, apart from their stencilled embellishments. The full range of physical materials created in the course of Representing Cromarty was available in the West Church Hall. We received over 60 'dreams' via our Cromarty Dreaming Post Boxes, located in Cromarty Library and West Church Hall. Through a form of grounded theory these materials provided the headline themes. These are: • Cromarty Dreaming • Working on Our Wellbeing • Our Migration Stories • The Cromarty We Know • How Cromarty Cares • Cromarty Connections As can be seen in the photos, using Gludots, tracing paper and liquid chalk, magic post-its, drawing materials and actual items from past sessions (2014-2016), co-producers can move materials around and settle upon a final visual summary of what they want to say, and how they want to represent their own strands and experiences, as they relate to these headline themes. This is a departure from our original plan of a docu-drama because we were striving to evade the 'black-boxing' of the analysis process. By making the analysis process into an enormous, physical, scrap-booking process, wherein, through using non-permanent fixings, every item can repositioned (rethought), we created and trialled a visual, collective and physically active mode of analysis and synthesis. Hence this was theatre and performance, but of a far more subtle and inclusive kind, with no audience, only players. The 'town-wide' exhibition aspect was created through having 2 exhibition/ activity venues; outdoor panels in 4 locations and activities involving journeys between and around these, some of which were GPS tracked. The open ended nature of this process reflects the principles of deep mapping, in cautioning us not to close off the conceptual journey, but to instead insist on maintaining and respecting the manner in which this weaving of meaning and place, and the participants' emplaced co-creation of modes for achieving, or striving for, adequate forms of personal and collective wellbeing, persists on into the moments after. The sub-panels were: • Likes - started as photovoice & turned into drawing by our co-producers • Dislikes - started as photovoice & turned into drawing by our co-producers • Experimenting with Methods - visual means of commenting on favourites/ feedback • How does a project like this make a difference to how health and wellbeing policy is developed? - gathering of different points of view on this 
 
Title Dal Ati (Keep at it) 
Description This film was created by Light Trap Films from material gathered through drama workshops relating to young peoples' responses to an animation about the Wellbeing of Future Generations Act (Wales) 2015. The drama workshops were conducted by Charlotte Lewis and Rhiannon White. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2016 
Impact The film was shown at the National Eisteddfod of Wales and at policy meetings and workshops. 
URL https://www.facebook.com/northmerthyr/videos/1201891939884880/?hc_ref=SEARCH
 
Title Digital Stories 
Description 6 digital life stories and 2 extended digital life stories of elders in Wales 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact Community members being able to see themselves Positive sharing of knowledge Building confidence and sense of value in their own stories 
 
Title Digital Stories of Dennistoun 
Description A series of eleven digital stories comprised of participant and professional photography and the words of residents of Dennistoun. The stories comprise an analytical chapter based on findings form the Representing Dennistoun project; assets, belonging, boundaries, change, derelict space, division, empowerment, popular myths and violence. A digital story created by the local photography group and a summary story have also been produced. 
Type Of Art Artefact (including digital) 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact These have been used to communicate project findings in knowledge exchange events. 
 
Title Digital Stories: older people 
Description Digital stories with older people, made from conversations they recorded and images they chose. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact A selection of digital stories featured in an engagement event in Merthyr, and they have been released online for public viewing. 
 
Title Domino Club exhibition 
Description This exhibition was developed on site with a weekly 'pop-up' open access studio. The Domino Club exhibition included: soundscape interactive domino table installation large canvas painting photographs 
Type Of Art Artistic/Creative Exhibition 
Year Produced 2016 
Impact The domino Club exhibition temporarily converted the Butetown Community Centre's main hall into a gallery space. The launch of the exhibition coincided with one of the Domino 'home' games with an invited team. Impacts included: visibility - numbers away of the Club and their work with us increased positive feeling - members involved in the process Exposure for the community centre and potential for use of space for art exhibitions with different groups 
 
Title Domino Club photographic exhibition 
Description A series of photographic depictions of Butetown Domino Social Club members through the years in collaboration with our community partner 15th Floor Productions 
Type Of Art Artistic/Creative Exhibition 
Year Produced 2016 
Impact Legacy, leaving a product with the group we have been working with. Visibility of Domino Club to users of the Butetown Community Centre. 
 
Title How Cromarty Cares 
Description 10 outdoor exhibition banners, made from visual materials and words generated throughout this project. These large street banners present and represent the 'findings' from our deep mapping journey. The set created in 2015 described the ealry days of that journey. They are all displayed in the final month of the project, around the town. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2017 
Impact Street reporting reaches the diest possible set of people. The style and content resonate with the co-created themes and thoughts from Cromarty Dreaming in 2015. 
 
Title Islands in the Stream: Banners 
Description A set of 10 banners, measuring c 2.5 x 1.5metres, created from archive maps and children's artwork and map making. Designed as a form of visual reporting, inspired by fabric designs (Paisley patterns) and used as an outdoor and indoor exhibition. 
Type Of Art Artistic/Creative Exhibition 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact Hugely increased project profile and a far deeper understanding of project aims and activities. Visual account of co-production, locally, and through work with regional archives and The National Library of Scotland. 
 
Title Key Trouble 
Description Key Trouble is a children's story composed by Year 4/5 primary school pupils in North Merthyr. The pupils were supported by Michael Harvey, international storyteller, for six weeks to write the story from scratch. They then worked with illustrator Sarah Edmunds to create scenery and characters for the story. An e-book was the result of the project. 
Type Of Art Creative Writing 
Year Produced 2014 
Impact - Storytelling, creative writing and visual arts provided a source of pride and confidence for pupils that they could contribute to an artistic process, even if they did not feel they 'can write' or 'can draw'; - Contribution to knowledge on embodied participatory arts processes; - Provided the basis of an ongoing and strengthening partnership between our project, local schools, and the POSSIB project (part of the lottery-funded MAGNET project in Merthyr) 
URL http://www.representingcommunities.co.uk/merthyr/creative-spaces
 
Title Memo...mono...move 
Description A performance of monologues based on research data, with memory jar workshops and dance/movement workshops, leading to a 20 minute performance installation in front of an audience of 180 people in Merthyr town centre 
Type Of Art Performance (Music, Dance, Drama, etc) 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact Audience was a range of stakeholders including policy and community development representatives, local residents, academics and artists. Local schools and residents have been asking for more engagement! 
 
Title Merthyr Moves DVD 
Description A collection of 5 short films created by residents, artists and researchers 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact distributed to local residents, organisations and participants 
 
Title Merthyr's Big Heart 
Description A song and music video written and filmed by young people in Merthyr 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact Public screening in Merthyr 
 
Title Merthyr's Big Heart: an introduction 
Description A documentary film about a music video created by young people in Merthyr 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact Public screening in Merthyr 
 
Title My Lens: A Trilogy of short films produced by Gavin Porter 
Description As part of the Representing Butetown study (2013 - 2017), I was asked to capture the area where I was born, grew up and continue to live. No strings attached, so in whatever fashion, style or focus I wanted. In some respects, this was a dream commission and in some ways it was quite difficult. The brief 'to create any video you want related to Butetown' lead to days of a creative block, angst about how good or bad and artist I am and a load of reality checking. I am used to having a more definitive brief, 'Make a film about the regeneration of the Butetown shops' and I can easily slip into a convention. That convention being to shoot a few interviews of people talking about how great it is, have someone talk about 'the Old Bay', shoot the icons, The Flats etc and capture footage showing how diverse the community is. It feels that a mixture of these conventions plus a few others including black and white photos and footage of how Butetown/Tiger Bay used to be are the standard Butetown Videos, what the commissioner and the artist expect. Now I'm not suggesting that what I have created is radical video art but these are radical for me, in terms of fighting against the conventions mentioned above. And as some one from the community these conventions feel deeply in engrained into my psyche. So after days, possibly weeks of thinking about what I should create I decided that I was going to take my camera out walk around Butetown and shoot what I saw, the things I see everyday as I go about my daily business. I had no set plan and I hoped to shoot instinctively, trying not to over analyse. My brief to myself was to represent the everyday through my lens. After getting home and beginning to edit I realised that I wasn't interested in showing iconic buildings, I wasn't interested in the myths and legends and wasn't interested in showing the diversity of the community because all of this has been well documented. I was interested in the everyday, the unseen, the uncelebrated. I went out the next day to capture more images, I decided to choose a prime lens (one that doesn't zoom) which is best for medium to close up shots, so the technology would limit the type of shot available. I continued to shoot the details that interested me as I walked to streets. Full details of the three short films can found by visiting the link. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2017 
Impact An opportunity for local artist to capture on film elements of the area freed from any constraint or dictate by the research team.. to capture his area as an artist and to reflect on that process. For us, it is an opportunity to find ways to place the findings in different contexts. 
URL http://representingcommunities.co.uk/butetown/events-outputs/my-lens-a-trilogy-of-short-films-produc...
 
Title Photovoice 
Description A series of photographs taken by young people about their community and lives within it 
Type Of Art Image 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact Provoking discussion at an engagement event, public exhibitions in Merthyr 
 
Title Poems with Parkview School (a Trojan Horse Controversy Linked School) 
Description Weekly creative writing and creating poetry classes were held in a school based in Hodge Hill. 
Type Of Art Creative Writing 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact Breaking down stereotypes of young people living in Hodge Hill. Creating realistic viewpoints of young people and their lived lives Understanding of identity, culture, religion and lived experience. 
 
Title Poems written in collaboration with Pakistani Elders 
Description 15 week poetry creation and discussion sessions were held at Ward End Asian Elders Centre. Pakistani men took part in discussion and through discussions, a poet facilitated the creation of 4 migration, place, health and wellbeing themed poems based on men's lived lives. 
Type Of Art Creative Writing 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact An interest from Birmingham City Council in terms of understanding Pakistani men's experiences of health and well-being. 
 
Title Re-Presenting Caribbean Elders in Wales 
Description Documentary film focusing on our work with the African Caribbean Elder Society and the launch event: The Assembly 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2014 
Impact Screening of documentary provided the opportunity for the ACES members to see themselves represented in a positive light. 
URL http://vimeo.com/116055256
 
Title Representing Butetown: The Lens 
Description Representing Butetown: The Lens brought together photographers/artists from Butetown and further afield, who have made this community a focus in their work. The aim was to bring together those living and/or working in Butetown, as well as those in the history, heritage and arts sectors, to re-ignite conversation on the many ways in which Butetown has, and is being represented. • Reflections on representations of Butetown (Neil Evans) • Responses to short video interviews produced by Representing Butetown (Adeola Dewis) • Conversational guide to exhibited work by the photographers/artists: • John Briggs, Simon and Anthony Campbell, Glenn Jordan, Kyle Legall, Hadyn Lassiter and Andrew McNeill • Showcasing of local work undertaken by Glamorgan Record Office and Cardiff Museum • Public viewing of pop-up exhibition 
Type Of Art Artistic/Creative Exhibition 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact Networking Creating the space to hear community voice in response to images of and about them 
 
Title Representing Cromarty Project Archive 
Description Audio, video and craft generated materials providing on-going interogation of the project and process. These are catalogued for deposit with Cromarty Court House Museum and The Highland Archive Centre. A number of video shorts generated out of these materials. Source materials for co-reation of findings and social dreaming for futures we might want to shape. 
Type Of Art Artefact (including digital) 
Year Produced 2017 
Impact This is a colleciton in process, as recommended by the deep mapping method which asks that we do not artifically 'close' the conversations or the associated colleciton, generated through the work. 
 
Title Representing Hodgehill 
Description Introduction video of The Hodge Hill case study which is part of the Representing Communities: Developing the Creative Power of People to Improve Health and Well-Being. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2014 
Impact THe impact of the video is that we presented the video at the Cardiff AHRC funded Showcase event and also are using this video to promote our study and inform the population of our research. 
URL http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RoSn-NWr7NE&feature=youtu.be
 
Title Wellbeing Matters event 05th February 2016 
Description A luncheon event, photo-shoot and creative gathering honouring Pauline Andam, Founder and Coordinator of African Caribbean Elder Sisters (ACES) and Neville Howard using storytelling, dance, singing, interactive performance, digital stories and photography. 
Type Of Art Performance (Music, Dance, Drama, etc) 
Year Produced 2016 
Impact Outputs included portrait photographs contributing to a public exhibition. Impact include: positive visibility for participants, views from publicity, feedback from exhibition 
 
Title Whose Butetown: Exploring with local arts pracitioners pathways to engagement and (re) presentation 
Description A launch event for this case study was held on 1 July 2014. This free event - A Journey So Far: Remembering the Caribbean in Butetown - Past and Present - was developed in collaboration with the National Theatre Wales (NTW), using its Assembly model and with additional funding secured as part of the 2014 Connected Communities Festival. The aim of the event was to: • celebrate the historical and contemporary links and emotional ties people have/have had to key places in Butetown (the churches, centres, pubs and streets) • open up space for Caribbean migrants to reflect on the role in their lives of key places and activities in Butetown when they arrived and settled in Cardiff • enable Caribbean migrants and their children to share the varying impact that Butetown has had on their lives over time and in changing circumstances • give people the opportunity to share what Butetown means to them today • explore the Assembly model as one creative, participatory approach to generating evidence about the everyday lives of communities. In developing the performances, interviews were conducted with each member of the team, and a small-group discussion was also facilitated and filmed. The raw footage was used to help develop a short (15-minute) film on both the Representing 'Butetown' case study (with footage collected by our arts partner, Tara Wyllie of House of Le Fou Film Productions) and the Representing North Merthyr case study (led by Eva Elliott and Ellie Byrne, with arts partner Richard Davies of Forge Films). Additional funding (from a separate University of South Wales fund) was used to commission further editing of this raw footage into five short films. Currently housed on Vimeo (http://vimeo.com/houseoflefou/videos), the films showcase members of the creative team and their roles, providing insights into the Assembly as a method of community engagement. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2014 
Impact The short films also reveal the team members' understandings of Butetown, representation, community and belonging. been granted. 
URL http://vimeo.com/houseoflefou/videos
 
Description Arts methods can provide knowledge of the everyday understandings, management and practices of wellbeing:

Across the study the project has managed to capture community based understandings, practices and performances of wellbeing in five different places. Arts based approaches to working with communities made the familiar strange to community members themselves, and the invisible visible to other publics, policy makers and professionals. Thus the potential of arts based approaches in articulating the possibilities of transformation were evident. The study also blurred the distinction between the creativity held by artists and the creativity inherent in everyday encounters and places of significance. The art speaks for itself but also generates different kinds of conversation and debate about what wellbeing is, how it can shape public health and wellbeing and what approaches might be used to understand emerging wellbeing concerns and possibilities.

Wellbeing is supported in subtle ways and through semi-formal structures of care:
Stories and portrayals of wellbeing are revealed in the forms of sociability and 'community beingness' that are available to different groups of people, whether these are in a domino club, a luncheon club or outside the local shops. For older people, in particular, these provide opportunities to acknowledge memories and journeys as well as affirming future possibilities. However people also talked of the warp and weft of everyday care. Gentle signposting and the careful nurturing of confidence and skills performed by community workers suggested that these forms of street level care are a form of 'craft' work.

Reputational damage hurts and can work many ways:
The study focused on representations and in finding ways of managing, challenging or countering these. Existing representations were by not always rejected and the community groups we worked with differed in terms of how they viewed narratives from both the past and the present. The project succeeded in generating insights of everyday wellbeing that are hidden from formal representations. The research process itself turned 'reputations' into a live issue that had to be managed carefully. Communities were suspicious of how we would handle these and could be wary of any attempt to make 'visible' narratives that were not crafted carefully. This raises ethical issues about what constitutes legitimate silencing of what is seen and heard. Researchers themselves also came with baggage as outsiders who will promise much, deliver little and disappear soon.

Co-production requires collective skills of knowing when to step up or step back:
Our primary concern was to place community members centre stage, with the cultural authority to generate their own insights into community life. Working as a researchers across disciplinary boundaries with artists required a considerable amount of learning and skill in terms of when to hand authority over the research process to others. It was important to recognise when an artist had superior skills in crafting an insight with a community group and at other times it required a recognition of an artist's imposition on a community's group's cultural authority. Co-production involves the sharing of different skills, knowledge and resources throughout the process.
Exploitation Route We would argue that pathways to impact depend on good partnership working in terms of developing research activities and new ways of working. We found that in working with, and alongside schools, cultural organisations, libraries and other public bodies generated conversations about our methods and findings that scaled up an understanding of our methods and findings within the organisations. In relation to policy it helped to understand the concerns and priorities of local and national government in order to identify the opportunities to contribute to their own objectives. In particular the Well-being of Future Generations (Wales) Act 2015 has provided a local and national vehicle through which the methods and findings relevant to the well being goals can be used. In terms of communities we feel that working in co-production through the sharing of ideas, resources and knowledge creates new knowledge spaces in which multiple voice can participate (community, policy, academic and arts).
Sectors Communities and Social Services/Policy,Healthcare,Government, Democracy and Justice,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections
URL http://representingcommunities.co.uk/
 
Description Whilst some impacts are already evident at personal, community and local policy levels, we anticipate that more significant impacts at national policy levels, on public services and on professional practice, will develop over the next few months and years through policy, professional and community engagement. Impacts have been uneven as it depends on the local, regional and national policy contexts in which the case studies were embedded. In terms of national policy it should be emphasized that there are different policy and legislative entry points for our research methods and findings to take root. Individual level change for participants Some aspects of the impact of our work we anticipated. For example, already knowing the effect that arts-based methods can have, we suspected that the research might have deep impacts on some individuals. Whilst this depended on the activity (and not all of them were successful) people who participated in arts based activities told us they had moved, sang and danced with a confidence and a sense of agency they had lacked before. For some young people taking part in photography research told us it had changed the way they perceived their community and its landscape. For other people it created new opportunities for people to experience the arts. Two participants, following the theatre event in Merthyr Tydfil in Wales, The People's Platform, were involved in a performance piece supported by National Theatre Wales (with the National Theatres in England and Scotland) entitled We're Here Because We're Here which remember those who fought and died in the first day of the Battle of the Somme. Some participants told us that taking part in the research had contributed to their mental wellbeing, and that it had been an important part of their lives. Following her involvement in interviews, photography, and storytelling, for example, one young migrant mother in Dennistoun has gone on to do a Masters degree in journalism at a local university. People learned new skills, developed their social networks, gained insights into their community and created high quality art which was, in some cases, professionally exhibited, performed or screened. Some activities have directly developed skills. For 15 community members in Merthyr Tydfil were provided with facilitation as part of The People's Platform which they have gone on to use in other settings. In Cromarty, several co-producers who are not accustomed to involving themselves in community activities have very much enjoyed being able to use these creative methods as a means to express and discuss both difficult and joyful aspects of their lived experience, anonymously. Certain of these co-producers gradually took on an organising role in some elements of activity, as a result of this. The collective approach enabled through the principles of co-creation made overcoming language barriers such as having little or no English, in discussing and exploring 'Our Migration Stories', far more achievable, and that sensitive outreach work, aimed at quiet inclusion, was conducted by co-producers themselves, who were new to that kind of role in the town. The Representing Butetown project allowed local artists to find ways to move beyond the standard response to attention from outsiders - researchers included. An example of this is series of short films produced by a local visual artist produced at the end of the project where he explored his relationship with the area extent freed (to a notably extent) from the constraints of producing an alternative representation of the area. Rather he drew on his arts practice to imagine his home in his own way, for his own purpose. It is important to note that our work and impact is linked ongoing work taking place in the area, in particular the work of National Theatre Wales who in the three years prior to the start of the project has conducted a series of public assemblies. We launched our project with an Assembly and we were able to work closely with the local artists who had worked with NTW. In Hodge Hill, Birmingham, pupils in a school affected by the Trojan Horse controversy were provided with an opportunity to express themselves and they created a powerful and authentic counter narrative to media portrayals through the creation of 52 poems that are currently being printed in a book. Copies of this book will be presented to each child in the school and to local schools in the area. Once distributed we plan to work with the schools in the local area to see how this set of poems can contribute to the local school curriculum. Impact at the Community Level At a community level, the impact of the research must be considered alongside other work happening in the areas in which we work. Impact was deeper and more extensive when we worked alongside other partners. Some activities, and subsequent impact, were only possible through collaborations with organisations and projects such as local schools, community centres, social clubs, libraries, museums, theatre companies, and other arts organisations, cultural venues and projects. Co-funding with partners such as POSSIB (a bilingual arts project in Wales) added value to other arts based activities, performances and events. We were also able to co-fund a Photovoice project, which trained young people in photographic techniques. With POSSIB, co-funding has meant we could also enhance the creative options available for the People's Platform, engaging a diverse creative team who not only ensured that the production was of the highest artistic standard but also meant that we could fund their extra support for people in the community who wanted to perform or participate in some other way (set as set building and design). Representing Butetown were able to capture community-level responses via is facebook page (360 members). The responses to the various exhibitions and events were largely focussed on those who were involved from the community, the very public and collaborative nature of the event or activity, and space given for community representations. For example, responses to exhibition showcasing all the key encounters of the study housed at the Cardiff Museum: Response: It's all about the location though - it is in the heart of the community and although the wall is not perfect it is also integral to the exhibition ... It was risky/brave to place the pictures where they can easily be reached but the visual and emotional impact is far stronger because of it ... What we do may draw some negative responses but that is part and parcel of the community also? Response: Yes, agree the visual impact is fantastic and the emotional significance really does say 'this is Butetown' . Just a shame that not all will have the same pride in the beauty of such a community. Well done though to everyone. Going to check it out today.? In some cases, as academic institutions, we have been able to apply for additional funding to produce collaborative pieces of work for our mutual benefit. For instance, as an off-spin of the Representing Dennistoun project, Impact Arts applied for and was successful in being awarded £10,000 from the National Lottery's Celebrate fund to explore the impact of this significant year in Glasgow's history in the East End, with particular focus on Dennistoun. It concentrated on capturing the community's experience of the Commonwealth Games, the centenary of WWI, and the Referendum. This enterprise was brought together with a photography project taking place in Dennistoun by Eoin Carey and Paula Morgan entitled Washing Lines.The aim was to capture the changing nature of Dennistoun's social landscape and to help forge a new identity for the area through photography. Eoin and Paula wished to depict images of Dennistoun's residents with their washing, alluding to 'the barriers to social interaction in the urban environment and a response to the changing fabric of community'. Glasgow Open House Exhibition took place in 2015 and the impact of Washing Lines was wide-reaching with the story of the project featuring on an STV Glasgow late bulletin news programme on April 21st 2015. The impact that we have brought to our partners is noteworthy. We have funded activities such as creating digital stories, connecting with other communities via messages in bottles, banner making, music, film making, photography, song writing and recording, drama and performance. All of these activities have enriched learning and have helped institutions broaden the range and quality of their usual practice. The photography project in Merthyr for instance directly contributed to several young peoples' Art GCSE. In Dennistoun there are similarly impressive impacts on partner institutions. The team responsible for the refurb of Glasgow's Burrell collection have sought advice and guidance on engaging with communities adjacent to the Museum inspired by Representing Communities activity. One key impact that Representing Dennistoun has had is on Dennistoun Library and the wider organisation in which it sits, Glasgow Life. In December 2014, the local research team brokered a partnership between Impact Arts and Dennistoun Library that saw the library turned into Narnia for the day. This event brought people from a wide range of backgrounds into the library, some for the first time (more than 400 people attended the event over a three-hour period). It transformed the library into a different kind of space, expanding the scope of what a library could be or represent. One of the senior managers of the library told us that the collaboration we helped to foster 'is probably a bit about survival for both the organisations because libraries at the moment in the current climate, we don't have a lot of staff. We don't have a lot of resources. We wouldn't be able to put on a big event like that on our own. So it's amazing for us to work with a local actual organisation, who can come in, build all these things, work so flexibly with us to make it happen. But then we can offer them a real true community venue for that event to happen.' During the life of the Representing Butetown case study a new organisation - The Bay Archives - was established. Rooted in over 30 years of community arts activism, the aim of the organisation is to preserve the collection of films, photographs, oral history interviews and other collections collected by local community members. A one day a week artist-in-residence within the organisation between 2015 - 2016, the linking of encounters as part of the work of the organisation and the structure that underpinned such work (e.g., weekly meetings, funding allocated directly to the organisation) were important in helping to establish this organisation and the work it is now set to do. In Hodge Hill we have been able to work with a local organisation (The Unity Hubb) who had opened its doors in a newly renovated church in 2014. Through holding many activities in the church space including a one day "Games for All" community event we were able to facilitate the introduction of this new space to the majority Muslim community and ease fears and rumours that this space would not be used. The space is currently a well-used facility in the community. Films were an important medium for highlighting the forms of activity, and spaces for positive interaction, for older people. In Merthyr Tydfil these have been used directly as evidence to, for instance, Public Health Wales, of the importance of activity groups for social inclusion and increased social interaction. In Dennistoun films are being used for this purpose by other organisations such as the Library Manager at Dennistoun Library. Cromarty residents who are members of the Highland 'Evidencing' Health and Wellbeing Group, created by the Representing Cromarty team, reported that they are impressed and delighted with the extent and demographic diversity of participation amongst residents. In particular, they are hugely impressed to find that the approach taken has engaged most fully with residents who do not normally engage in community development processes, and has drawn in such a broad age range too, through a twin-track focus on 'the elders' and young people. A key observation, in this discussion, is: 'Quiet people are the stabilising backbone of community - deep mapping has got their voices 'heard''. The health sector and third sector members of this group are excited about the potential of a deep mapping based approach to bring together diverse, qualitative and quantitative sectoral evidencing practices in a meaningful and effective way, to save time and facilitate easier sharing and use of information. Some of this group also hope that this might be a route to breaking down language barriers to participation and self-realisation, and to counter stigmas perpetuated through certain health sector nomenclatures. One such co-producer, inspired by her experiences in this project, has created a monthly Classic Film Club with and for elderly residents in an entirely different village, outwith the case study area. The venue is rotated round members' houses and attendance is arranged using car-sharing and Community Transport. A maximum of 48 people can be accommodated. The decision made by the Representing Butetown team to foster formal partnerships with Cardiff-based heritage, archive and museums meant that we were able to write into these agreements collaborative engagement that brought people and groups together over the course of the project. Now that the project has ended some of these connections remain intact and are developing. For example, Bay Life Archives, a Butetown-based community archive has established links with Glamorgan Record Office who has given a undertaking to support and contribute to a HLF grant application to develop the archive. The partnership work and permission to mount a public exhibition along the railway wall that runs along Bute Street has led the Company's interest in playing a more active role in the community and moreover, in extending (in space and permission to use the wall) the exhibition. Lastly, working with community members and organisations closely and collaborative has led to shifts in our positioning, the approaches we used and the projects we are asking our university to support. One example is the proposed studentship rooted in exploring the role and value of leisure for migrant elders (dominos) that is currently advertised. Policy Impact Local Our impact at a wider level has also been noted. Both the methods and findings of the Representing Communities have been picked up by local authorities and other public bodies. In November 2016 the research team in Dennistoun gave a presentation to Glasgow Life and the discussion revealed a general consensus that the methods and theoretical framework of Representing Communities offered an important contribution to thinking about the responsibilities of cultural institutions have in holding and promoting certain stories and how this becomes a particularly relevant in choices made by cultural institutions around what they collect for the city. There was also discussion of how stories could be used to inspire more creative data collection methods beyond questionnaire data. Mark O'Neill, Glasgow Life's Director of Policy and Research emailed the team later to offer further support for the project. Relationship with Glasgow Life continues to develop a mutual research agenda across institutions around culture and health using learning underpinned by Representing Communities research. In Merthyr Tydfil the local research team have developed relationships with Merthyr Tydfil Local Authority, and were invited to contribute to their understanding of wellbeing and the development of wellbeing objectives in relation to the Wellbeing of Future Generations Act (Wales) 2015. The group at the local authority includes the Chief Executive, several Heads of Service and Chief Officers, and colleagues in Performance, Finance and Communication. The impact we have on their practice is at the time of writing unknown, although Ewan McWilliams, Corporate Performance Manager, informed us that our research 'is going to make an invaluable contribution to our [LA] understanding or wellbeing in Merthyr Tydfil. My team and I will use (and reference) the work you have done, drawing out key messages to inform our wellbeing objectives. This will show the connection between the work you do and its influence over the strategy of the local authority.' High Life Highland's Black Isle Youth Development team report that because of their significant involvement in the Representing Cromarty work they have changed how they evaluate the success of youth activities. Previously they based that on numbers attending. Now they seek to routinely incorporate ways of finding out how activities affect participants' articulacy regarding wellbeing issues and how activity programmes affect participants' sense of personal wellbeing. They have requested the creation of a simple Handbook of methods used in our project work as a resource for them to draw upon in their own future work. As a result of involvement in this project, the new Cromarty Care Project, developing and delivering flexible, locally sourced, home care, are interested in being supported and assisted to use a personal co-created Scrapbook based method for care monitoring and evaluation. The idea is that carers and clients use this together to track and describe needs and related actions. It is hoped that this might be of particular value for clients with dementia. In Hodge Hilll, at the beginning of our work, we did not find an infrastructure of arts based activities. Attempts at engagement with the Pakistani community with the arts had resulted in a view that the community were not interested in arts based activities. Through our grounded bottom up work where we worked with the community itself to develop culturally appropriate arts based activities we have been able to demonstrate through the creation of a range of activities such as poems, a play, a wall hanging that there is an appetite for arts based activities. Within the area we are seeing a slow rise in arts based activities taking place. National Policy and Legislation In Wales we have established links with the National Assembly of Wales and Welsh Government as well as arts institutions such as National Theatre Wales. Talking about one of our engagement events (a film screening and arts and photography exhibition) in June 2015, Kevin Davies, Senior Outreach Officer, said: "What I loved about the engagement you delivered was that it was co-owned, co-produced, engaged key decision makers and people from the local community, and that those who participated gained new skills (like film making, photography, researchas well as knowing they elected representatives that can support them). I'm currently in the process of writing the Assembly's public engagement strategy for the 5th Assembly, and I have referenced the work that you have delivered in several conversations around how we can engage the people of Wales in the work of the Assembly, and the democratic process on a broader level. This will no doubt influence the way we design our activities in the future." In terms of the impact on arts Phil George, the new Chair of the Arts Council in Wales, highlighted The People's Platform in an article on his vision for the arts in Wales. He wrote 'There's a well-lit mini boxing ring with a fighter training; a washing-line monologue about a mother and her teenage son. Issues are raised which stimulate discussions at tables around the club lounge. It's called The People's Platform and it's focused on celebrating the people of this feisty, talented and massively disadvantaged town. I'm there as the new Chair of the Arts Council of Wales. But why do I begin this piece with this scene, with this story? Well, because in these confused and anxious days after the Brexit vote, it needs to be said that all over Wales, artists and arts organisations are building community and civic life just when we need it most, just when we're seeing that disconnect between people in the street and the institutions that shape public life. Far from being icing on the cake or an optional extra, the arts are creating a culture of aspiration, opportunities for self-expression and opening up horizons for young and old alike'. (Western Mail, 16 July, 2016). In addition, as the project has progressed, we have established and deepened links within a wider arts and culture organisations and with universities interested in learning more about the area. A member of the Butetown team is now conducting an evaluation of the WMC's project Tiger Bay Tales and is also hosting in April 2017, a groups of Sociology students from Birmingham University whose visit will include a walking tour of the area by local historian, Neil Evans which will include the public exhibitions co-created with local photographers. In Scotland the research team have engaged productively with the NHS Health Improvement team for North East Glasgow, Glasgow Life (museums, libraries, and art galleries) and elected members of the Scottish Government as well as local arts organisations based in the east end such as Impact Arts and Platform. An email from the Director of Glasgow Life pointed out our aligned interests: 'I think your research may be creating an intellectual framework for a lot of our work. The institutions we run - arts venues, libraries, museums and sports centres - and the events we organise -are all stories about Glasgow, its aspirations, its sense of itself and how it imagines the lives of its citizens. They also tell the stories of the people of Glasgow - though we have a long way to go in being representative. We struggle in a lot of our work to work with the negative realities of large scale poverty, ill-health and poor education and our role in 'creating better stories' which are not just spin.' Discussions about the implications of this work, in Scotland, have been held with constituency MSPs, Maree Todd and Ivan McKee. They are hosting our Parliamentary Reception and Exhibition, in Autumn 2017, through which we will move this conversation onto a national basis. Materials such as those on mental health, derived from analysis of rural fiction, are being used as a basis for a series of 'Nature Works' Campfire Conversations, linked to the UK wide Campfire Convention, launched last year by Pete Lawrence. Issie MacPhail is a founding member: http://campfireconvention.com/ She attended the inaugural event with Professor Woodward from University of Newcastle. In Birmingham, Birmingham City Council, The Place Directorate set up "The Community Intelligence Network" and invited Dr Fazil to be a member, she regularly attended these meetings during 2015 and she gave a presentation of the Hodge Hill Case Study research findings. National and International Initiatives Via the Director of Public Health and Public Health Policy, NHS Scotland, the Representing Cromarty team have been approached by the Scottish UNESCO Geoparks, to lead and advise on the development of a 3 stage study into wellbeing in Scottish UNESCO Geoparks using the method of deep mapping. Stage 1 involves co-creating a deep mapping approach suited to use in Scottish UNESCO Geoparks in Scotland, with health sector, Scottish Natural Heritage, Forestry Commission and community stakeholders. The aim is that in Stage 2 this will be used and tested in 3 Geoparks in Scotland so that UNESCO Geoparks themselves, and the various sectoral participants, can align their policy approaches to generating wellbeing in outdoor environments, for residents and visitors, according to the findings. The final co-created model, founded on co-production via deep mapping, will then be rolled out across all UK UNESCO Geoparks. In Stage 3 a comparative study and co-produced project is planned with 3 continental European Geoparks and three in China. Camille Dressler, Chair of The Scottish Islands Federation, who is also Chair of ESIN (European Small Islands Federation) has approached the Representing Cromarty team with a view to including a deep mapping process in a later iteration of the SMART ISLANDS INITIATIVE process. The SMART Islands Declaration (Smart Islands Brussels Event: Creating New Pathways for EU islands) is due to be launched on 28th March 2017 in Brussels. It 'is a bottom-up effort spearheaded by island authorities that communicates the need to tap the significant, yet largely unexploited potential of islands to function as laboratories for technological, social, economic and political innovation'. The process is currently very quantitative and Camille would like us to help ESIN, and other actors in the SMART ISLAND Initiative use deep mapping to transform towards including qualitative and action research methods too.
First Year Of Impact 2016
Sector Communities and Social Services/Policy,Healthcare,Government, Democracy and Justice,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections,Other
Impact Types Cultural,Societal,Policy & public services
 
Description Evidencing Health and Wellbeing Challenges in Highland - on-going...
Geographic Reach Local/Municipal/Regional 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
 
Description Hosted a workshop at the Glasgow Centre for Population Health on Representing Dennistoun and our findings
Geographic Reach Local/Municipal/Regional 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
 
Description Member of Community Academic Intelligence group at Birmingham City Council
Geographic Reach Local/Municipal/Regional 
Policy Influence Type Membership of a guideline committee
 
Description Member of the Engagement Reference Group for Public Health Wales
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
Impact Impact is at the early stages in terms of shaping the strategy that Public Health Wales adopts in terms of how they both engage and empower public in their core services and function
 
Description Scottish Parliament - Cross Party Group on Rural Affairs: presentation, and Roundtable Q&A on Rural Health
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Gave evidence to a government review
URL http://www.sruc.ac.uk/downloads/120626/current_secretariat_year_2015-16
 
Description AHRC Connected Communities Festival 2015
Amount £9,894 (GBP)
Funding ID AH/K003372/1 (Representing Communities: Developing the Creative Power of People to Improve Health and Wellbeing) 
Organisation Arts & Humanities Research Council (AHRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK)
Start 04/2015 
End 12/2015
 
Description Carnegie Trust Public Engagement Grant
Amount £1,000 (GBP)
Organisation Carnegie Corporation of New York 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United States of America
Start 04/2015 
End 10/2015
 
Description Connected Communities Festival
Amount £56,600 (GBP)
Funding ID N/A 
Organisation Connected Communities 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK)
Start 05/2014 
End 07/2014
 
Description Connected Communities Festival 2015
Amount £9,894 (GBP)
Organisation Connected Communities 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK)
Start 04/2015 
End 12/2015
 
Description Connected Communities Festival 2016
Amount £9,996 (GBP)
Organisation Arts & Humanities Research Council (AHRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK)
Start 03/2016 
End 07/2016
 
Description Connected Communities Festival 2016
Amount £9,860 (GBP)
Organisation Connected Communities 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK)
Start 02/2016 
End 12/2016
 
Description Making Qualitative, Creative Engagement Part of Everyday Practice in the Health and Care Sector: Who is our 'community'?
Amount £2,900 (GBP)
Organisation Catalyst 
Sector Private
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK)
Start 03/2017 
End 11/2017
 
Description Pilot Engagement Funding
Amount £5,000 (GBP)
Funding ID KZ3010CR07 CRE 
Organisation Cardiff University 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK)
Start 03/2016 
End 09/2016
 
Description Seed Corn Funding
Amount £5,000 (GBP)
Organisation Cardiff University 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK)
Start 12/2014 
End 06/2015
 
Description 3G's Development Trust 
Organisation 3G's Development Trust
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The 3G's Development Trust is a community regeneration organisation that works across Gurnos, Penydarren and Dowlais wards in Merthyr Tydfil.
Collaborator Contribution Working Collaboratively in the Case Study Area
Impact No Specific Outputs to Report as Yet
Start Year 2013
 
Description BACA 
Organisation Butetown Arts and Culture Association
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Contributed design, making and perfomance to the Butetown Carnival organised by BACA
Collaborator Contribution Provide valuable access to local community members based in Butetown
Impact Butetown Carnival 2015
Start Year 2015
 
Description Butetown History & Arts Centre 
Organisation Butetown History & Arts Centre
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Based in the heart of Cardiff Bay, BHAC is a unique, innovative scheme. Our work, which began in 1987, involves local people in collaboration with professional researchers, artists and media workers. People's histories, together with cultural democracy, are the backbone of our work. BHAC collects, preserves, copies and utilises oral histories, old photographs and other documents; organises community education courses and works with schools and community groups.
Start Year 2013
 
Description Centre for Regeneration Excellence Wales 
Organisation Centre for Regeneration Excellence Wales (CREW)
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Centre for Regeneration Excellence Wales (CREW) is located in the Heads of the Valleys region with an all-Wales remit to promote excellence in regeneration.
Start Year 2013
 
Description Common Wealth Theatre 
Organisation Common Wealth Theatre Ltd
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution We have provided supervision for an academic project undertaken by one of the co-founders of Common Wealth, assisted with funding proposals, provided academic insights and links to the theatre practice of our partner and links to other academics working in similar fields. One of our research team is now a member of Common Wealth's Advisory Board and we have participated in R&D events for upcoming productions.
Collaborator Contribution Common Wealth has contributed expertise in theatre production to create a performance-based debate building on research data. They have also conducted follow up interviews for a documentary film about the event, contributed to academic seminars and conferences and funding proposals.
Impact The People's Platform - theatre event Dal Ati - a film FIlm about the People's Platform Newspaper article in the Western Mail written by Phil George, Chair of the Arts Council in Wales.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Communities First 
Organisation Communities First
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Cardiff's Ethnic Minority Communities programme is a city-wide initiative that aims to support minority ethnic groups and reduce deprivation within those communities.
Start Year 2013
 
Description Dennistoun Community Council 
Organisation Dennistoun Community Council
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Dr Claire McKechnie-Mason has been elected as an Associate Councillor on the Dennistoun Community Council. She attends monthly meetings and contributes as and when she can to the agenda on behalf of the Representing Dennistoun project
Collaborator Contribution The Dennistoun Community Council elected Dr McKechnie-Mason to give her access to the info shared at meetings and to gain greater insight into how the local community council is run, what events they are involved with, provide support and other ways about thinking about community engagement etc. as the project progresses.
Impact No outputs as yet
Start Year 2014
 
Description Evidencing Health & Wellbeing Challenges in Highland 
Organisation Black Isle Cares
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution We have spent time with each organisation to understand what they need and want from this research. We have incorporated those needs into our methods and project evaluation. We have put in place systems to share findings and to deposit research and artistic fieldwork materials in the regional and local archives in order to contribute to legacy beyond the life of this project. With these organisations, we are co-creating findings, final events and reporting to regional and national actors in health and wellbeing policy development. This group guides our explorations of policy applicaiotns from this work.
Collaborator Contribution NHS Highland - health statistics; staff participation at all levels from CE to those delivering primary care. Three staff sit on our Evidencing Challenges Group - see below. The HIghland Council - assistance with area analysis of 2011 census materials; discussion of key local and regional issues and exploration of those via in house systems; archive materials provided for video by Am Baile; participation by Ward Manager and local Councillors. Cath King, Health Improvement Policy Manager, serves on our Evidencing Challenges Group - see below. High Life Highland - Mark Richardson, the Principal Adult and Youth Services Manager serves on our Evidencing Challenges Group. Wanda Mackay, Black Isle Youth Development Officer and Fraser Thomson, Assistant Youth Worker are our key co-producers. The Highland Archive Centre - also part of High Life Highland - delivery or archive exhibition; training event for local history co-producers; on-going support for 8 -14 participants in archive research aspect of work. Was already signed up to project at grant application stage. Agreed to archive more sensitive project materials, at end of work. Advised on accession aspects of Informed Consent process. Provided day event for Archive Group, 2014. Further event in 2016 planned. Access to archive materials. Cromarty & District Community Council Presentation made at start. Provided with news updates. Post news items on their website sometimes. Formal links only, due to their heavy workload. Publicised the project, at the outset. The previous Chair was due to open the Islands in the Stream Exhibition last year, but sadly had to resign due to ill health, very suddenly. Cromarty Arts Trust Chair and staff provided early contacts, thoughts on project and continued advice on activities and contacts. Provided 'found materials' in the form of photos of past activities, and descriptions of them and their relevance to the project. Cromarty History Society Chair provides support and guidance. Guided Walk round the town, by Chair (videoed) and interview. This group recruited members to our project Archive Group. Presentations by two of those Archive group members to History Society were videoed. The visit to Highland Archive Centre contributed to these members' research for their talks. Provision of photos and past research reports - found materials. Cromarty Courthouse Museum Via David Alston, it was arranged at the start, that appropriate project materials would be deposited in their archive. Provision of local archiving for project materials. Key informant interview scheduled with archivist about broader project aims. Phone discussion with same, 2014, and sit down chat in Exhib, 2015. Found materials. Cromarty Image Library On-line access is public. Keeper of this collection has provided phone support and permissions for use of very many archive images in the Opening Thoughts video and creative activities. Friends of Hugh Miller Via Secretary and attendance at illustrated talks and AGMs. Participation of RA, alongside several residents, in RSGS Cruise of Betsey project. Invited to exhibit Opening Thoughts video at 3 day 'We Are Cromarty' art exhib and events programme. Townlands Sanctuary - now Cromarty Cares Project Input on care crisis in area and actions being taken to tackle that. Presentation to Committee, 2014. Advice on distance meeting options via IT. Provision of group plans and documents by Secretary. Support of Islands in Stream bid by group. Committee member attends our Evidencing Group. Discussion of group sessions on creative activities in progress. Cromarty Reading Group Advice from Librarian and one Reading group liaison member. Sessions based on fiction and wellbeing effects of libraries planned. One meet 2015, to plan future activities. Progress delayed by usual librarian being on maternity leave and change in group membership. 2016 activities under discussion. Cromarty Youth Cafe Project activities integrated into CYC regular schedule. Attendances c 20 - 30. Nine activity sessions, 2015, inc Exhib. CYC led on format, marketing and delivery of Islands in the Stream Exhib & Events. Nine activity sessions, 2016. The Fourways Club Project activities integrated into Fourways regular schedule. Attendances c 25-30. Three activity sessions in 2015; same in 2016. Many members attended Islands in Stream Drop In activities too. The Archive Group Group created by us for project work. 6 active members; 3 others interested. 2 activities in 2014; 1 in 2016. Evidencing Health & Wellbeing Challenges in Highland Group created by us for project work. Group comprises local and regional NHS, Highland Council, High Life Highland, Highland Children's Forum & Third Sector staff/ volunteers. Four audio recorded Roundtable discussions (2.5 hours); planned testing of methods, as legacy activity. Evidencing needs of members are added to our process and outputs, as an additional form of co-production.
Impact All of the research activities, events and deliberations regarding policy applications from this work, through the Representing Cromarty case study, rely upon the participation of the organisations listed. This collaboration is amongst practitioners, third sector organisations and the academic staff on the Representing Cromarty case study.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Evidencing Health & Wellbeing Challenges in Highland 
Organisation Cromarty Arts Trust
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution We have spent time with each organisation to understand what they need and want from this research. We have incorporated those needs into our methods and project evaluation. We have put in place systems to share findings and to deposit research and artistic fieldwork materials in the regional and local archives in order to contribute to legacy beyond the life of this project. With these organisations, we are co-creating findings, final events and reporting to regional and national actors in health and wellbeing policy development. This group guides our explorations of policy applicaiotns from this work.
Collaborator Contribution NHS Highland - health statistics; staff participation at all levels from CE to those delivering primary care. Three staff sit on our Evidencing Challenges Group - see below. The HIghland Council - assistance with area analysis of 2011 census materials; discussion of key local and regional issues and exploration of those via in house systems; archive materials provided for video by Am Baile; participation by Ward Manager and local Councillors. Cath King, Health Improvement Policy Manager, serves on our Evidencing Challenges Group - see below. High Life Highland - Mark Richardson, the Principal Adult and Youth Services Manager serves on our Evidencing Challenges Group. Wanda Mackay, Black Isle Youth Development Officer and Fraser Thomson, Assistant Youth Worker are our key co-producers. The Highland Archive Centre - also part of High Life Highland - delivery or archive exhibition; training event for local history co-producers; on-going support for 8 -14 participants in archive research aspect of work. Was already signed up to project at grant application stage. Agreed to archive more sensitive project materials, at end of work. Advised on accession aspects of Informed Consent process. Provided day event for Archive Group, 2014. Further event in 2016 planned. Access to archive materials. Cromarty & District Community Council Presentation made at start. Provided with news updates. Post news items on their website sometimes. Formal links only, due to their heavy workload. Publicised the project, at the outset. The previous Chair was due to open the Islands in the Stream Exhibition last year, but sadly had to resign due to ill health, very suddenly. Cromarty Arts Trust Chair and staff provided early contacts, thoughts on project and continued advice on activities and contacts. Provided 'found materials' in the form of photos of past activities, and descriptions of them and their relevance to the project. Cromarty History Society Chair provides support and guidance. Guided Walk round the town, by Chair (videoed) and interview. This group recruited members to our project Archive Group. Presentations by two of those Archive group members to History Society were videoed. The visit to Highland Archive Centre contributed to these members' research for their talks. Provision of photos and past research reports - found materials. Cromarty Courthouse Museum Via David Alston, it was arranged at the start, that appropriate project materials would be deposited in their archive. Provision of local archiving for project materials. Key informant interview scheduled with archivist about broader project aims. Phone discussion with same, 2014, and sit down chat in Exhib, 2015. Found materials. Cromarty Image Library On-line access is public. Keeper of this collection has provided phone support and permissions for use of very many archive images in the Opening Thoughts video and creative activities. Friends of Hugh Miller Via Secretary and attendance at illustrated talks and AGMs. Participation of RA, alongside several residents, in RSGS Cruise of Betsey project. Invited to exhibit Opening Thoughts video at 3 day 'We Are Cromarty' art exhib and events programme. Townlands Sanctuary - now Cromarty Cares Project Input on care crisis in area and actions being taken to tackle that. Presentation to Committee, 2014. Advice on distance meeting options via IT. Provision of group plans and documents by Secretary. Support of Islands in Stream bid by group. Committee member attends our Evidencing Group. Discussion of group sessions on creative activities in progress. Cromarty Reading Group Advice from Librarian and one Reading group liaison member. Sessions based on fiction and wellbeing effects of libraries planned. One meet 2015, to plan future activities. Progress delayed by usual librarian being on maternity leave and change in group membership. 2016 activities under discussion. Cromarty Youth Cafe Project activities integrated into CYC regular schedule. Attendances c 20 - 30. Nine activity sessions, 2015, inc Exhib. CYC led on format, marketing and delivery of Islands in the Stream Exhib & Events. Nine activity sessions, 2016. The Fourways Club Project activities integrated into Fourways regular schedule. Attendances c 25-30. Three activity sessions in 2015; same in 2016. Many members attended Islands in Stream Drop In activities too. The Archive Group Group created by us for project work. 6 active members; 3 others interested. 2 activities in 2014; 1 in 2016. Evidencing Health & Wellbeing Challenges in Highland Group created by us for project work. Group comprises local and regional NHS, Highland Council, High Life Highland, Highland Children's Forum & Third Sector staff/ volunteers. Four audio recorded Roundtable discussions (2.5 hours); planned testing of methods, as legacy activity. Evidencing needs of members are added to our process and outputs, as an additional form of co-production.
Impact All of the research activities, events and deliberations regarding policy applications from this work, through the Representing Cromarty case study, rely upon the participation of the organisations listed. This collaboration is amongst practitioners, third sector organisations and the academic staff on the Representing Cromarty case study.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Evidencing Health & Wellbeing Challenges in Highland 
Organisation Cromarty Cares Project
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution We have spent time with each organisation to understand what they need and want from this research. We have incorporated those needs into our methods and project evaluation. We have put in place systems to share findings and to deposit research and artistic fieldwork materials in the regional and local archives in order to contribute to legacy beyond the life of this project. With these organisations, we are co-creating findings, final events and reporting to regional and national actors in health and wellbeing policy development. This group guides our explorations of policy applicaiotns from this work.
Collaborator Contribution NHS Highland - health statistics; staff participation at all levels from CE to those delivering primary care. Three staff sit on our Evidencing Challenges Group - see below. The HIghland Council - assistance with area analysis of 2011 census materials; discussion of key local and regional issues and exploration of those via in house systems; archive materials provided for video by Am Baile; participation by Ward Manager and local Councillors. Cath King, Health Improvement Policy Manager, serves on our Evidencing Challenges Group - see below. High Life Highland - Mark Richardson, the Principal Adult and Youth Services Manager serves on our Evidencing Challenges Group. Wanda Mackay, Black Isle Youth Development Officer and Fraser Thomson, Assistant Youth Worker are our key co-producers. The Highland Archive Centre - also part of High Life Highland - delivery or archive exhibition; training event for local history co-producers; on-going support for 8 -14 participants in archive research aspect of work. Was already signed up to project at grant application stage. Agreed to archive more sensitive project materials, at end of work. Advised on accession aspects of Informed Consent process. Provided day event for Archive Group, 2014. Further event in 2016 planned. Access to archive materials. Cromarty & District Community Council Presentation made at start. Provided with news updates. Post news items on their website sometimes. Formal links only, due to their heavy workload. Publicised the project, at the outset. The previous Chair was due to open the Islands in the Stream Exhibition last year, but sadly had to resign due to ill health, very suddenly. Cromarty Arts Trust Chair and staff provided early contacts, thoughts on project and continued advice on activities and contacts. Provided 'found materials' in the form of photos of past activities, and descriptions of them and their relevance to the project. Cromarty History Society Chair provides support and guidance. Guided Walk round the town, by Chair (videoed) and interview. This group recruited members to our project Archive Group. Presentations by two of those Archive group members to History Society were videoed. The visit to Highland Archive Centre contributed to these members' research for their talks. Provision of photos and past research reports - found materials. Cromarty Courthouse Museum Via David Alston, it was arranged at the start, that appropriate project materials would be deposited in their archive. Provision of local archiving for project materials. Key informant interview scheduled with archivist about broader project aims. Phone discussion with same, 2014, and sit down chat in Exhib, 2015. Found materials. Cromarty Image Library On-line access is public. Keeper of this collection has provided phone support and permissions for use of very many archive images in the Opening Thoughts video and creative activities. Friends of Hugh Miller Via Secretary and attendance at illustrated talks and AGMs. Participation of RA, alongside several residents, in RSGS Cruise of Betsey project. Invited to exhibit Opening Thoughts video at 3 day 'We Are Cromarty' art exhib and events programme. Townlands Sanctuary - now Cromarty Cares Project Input on care crisis in area and actions being taken to tackle that. Presentation to Committee, 2014. Advice on distance meeting options via IT. Provision of group plans and documents by Secretary. Support of Islands in Stream bid by group. Committee member attends our Evidencing Group. Discussion of group sessions on creative activities in progress. Cromarty Reading Group Advice from Librarian and one Reading group liaison member. Sessions based on fiction and wellbeing effects of libraries planned. One meet 2015, to plan future activities. Progress delayed by usual librarian being on maternity leave and change in group membership. 2016 activities under discussion. Cromarty Youth Cafe Project activities integrated into CYC regular schedule. Attendances c 20 - 30. Nine activity sessions, 2015, inc Exhib. CYC led on format, marketing and delivery of Islands in the Stream Exhib & Events. Nine activity sessions, 2016. The Fourways Club Project activities integrated into Fourways regular schedule. Attendances c 25-30. Three activity sessions in 2015; same in 2016. Many members attended Islands in Stream Drop In activities too. The Archive Group Group created by us for project work. 6 active members; 3 others interested. 2 activities in 2014; 1 in 2016. Evidencing Health & Wellbeing Challenges in Highland Group created by us for project work. Group comprises local and regional NHS, Highland Council, High Life Highland, Highland Children's Forum & Third Sector staff/ volunteers. Four audio recorded Roundtable discussions (2.5 hours); planned testing of methods, as legacy activity. Evidencing needs of members are added to our process and outputs, as an additional form of co-production.
Impact All of the research activities, events and deliberations regarding policy applications from this work, through the Representing Cromarty case study, rely upon the participation of the organisations listed. This collaboration is amongst practitioners, third sector organisations and the academic staff on the Representing Cromarty case study.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Evidencing Health & Wellbeing Challenges in Highland 
Organisation Cromarty Courthouse Museum
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution We have spent time with each organisation to understand what they need and want from this research. We have incorporated those needs into our methods and project evaluation. We have put in place systems to share findings and to deposit research and artistic fieldwork materials in the regional and local archives in order to contribute to legacy beyond the life of this project. With these organisations, we are co-creating findings, final events and reporting to regional and national actors in health and wellbeing policy development. This group guides our explorations of policy applicaiotns from this work.
Collaborator Contribution NHS Highland - health statistics; staff participation at all levels from CE to those delivering primary care. Three staff sit on our Evidencing Challenges Group - see below. The HIghland Council - assistance with area analysis of 2011 census materials; discussion of key local and regional issues and exploration of those via in house systems; archive materials provided for video by Am Baile; participation by Ward Manager and local Councillors. Cath King, Health Improvement Policy Manager, serves on our Evidencing Challenges Group - see below. High Life Highland - Mark Richardson, the Principal Adult and Youth Services Manager serves on our Evidencing Challenges Group. Wanda Mackay, Black Isle Youth Development Officer and Fraser Thomson, Assistant Youth Worker are our key co-producers. The Highland Archive Centre - also part of High Life Highland - delivery or archive exhibition; training event for local history co-producers; on-going support for 8 -14 participants in archive research aspect of work. Was already signed up to project at grant application stage. Agreed to archive more sensitive project materials, at end of work. Advised on accession aspects of Informed Consent process. Provided day event for Archive Group, 2014. Further event in 2016 planned. Access to archive materials. Cromarty & District Community Council Presentation made at start. Provided with news updates. Post news items on their website sometimes. Formal links only, due to their heavy workload. Publicised the project, at the outset. The previous Chair was due to open the Islands in the Stream Exhibition last year, but sadly had to resign due to ill health, very suddenly. Cromarty Arts Trust Chair and staff provided early contacts, thoughts on project and continued advice on activities and contacts. Provided 'found materials' in the form of photos of past activities, and descriptions of them and their relevance to the project. Cromarty History Society Chair provides support and guidance. Guided Walk round the town, by Chair (videoed) and interview. This group recruited members to our project Archive Group. Presentations by two of those Archive group members to History Society were videoed. The visit to Highland Archive Centre contributed to these members' research for their talks. Provision of photos and past research reports - found materials. Cromarty Courthouse Museum Via David Alston, it was arranged at the start, that appropriate project materials would be deposited in their archive. Provision of local archiving for project materials. Key informant interview scheduled with archivist about broader project aims. Phone discussion with same, 2014, and sit down chat in Exhib, 2015. Found materials. Cromarty Image Library On-line access is public. Keeper of this collection has provided phone support and permissions for use of very many archive images in the Opening Thoughts video and creative activities. Friends of Hugh Miller Via Secretary and attendance at illustrated talks and AGMs. Participation of RA, alongside several residents, in RSGS Cruise of Betsey project. Invited to exhibit Opening Thoughts video at 3 day 'We Are Cromarty' art exhib and events programme. Townlands Sanctuary - now Cromarty Cares Project Input on care crisis in area and actions being taken to tackle that. Presentation to Committee, 2014. Advice on distance meeting options via IT. Provision of group plans and documents by Secretary. Support of Islands in Stream bid by group. Committee member attends our Evidencing Group. Discussion of group sessions on creative activities in progress. Cromarty Reading Group Advice from Librarian and one Reading group liaison member. Sessions based on fiction and wellbeing effects of libraries planned. One meet 2015, to plan future activities. Progress delayed by usual librarian being on maternity leave and change in group membership. 2016 activities under discussion. Cromarty Youth Cafe Project activities integrated into CYC regular schedule. Attendances c 20 - 30. Nine activity sessions, 2015, inc Exhib. CYC led on format, marketing and delivery of Islands in the Stream Exhib & Events. Nine activity sessions, 2016. The Fourways Club Project activities integrated into Fourways regular schedule. Attendances c 25-30. Three activity sessions in 2015; same in 2016. Many members attended Islands in Stream Drop In activities too. The Archive Group Group created by us for project work. 6 active members; 3 others interested. 2 activities in 2014; 1 in 2016. Evidencing Health & Wellbeing Challenges in Highland Group created by us for project work. Group comprises local and regional NHS, Highland Council, High Life Highland, Highland Children's Forum & Third Sector staff/ volunteers. Four audio recorded Roundtable discussions (2.5 hours); planned testing of methods, as legacy activity. Evidencing needs of members are added to our process and outputs, as an additional form of co-production.
Impact All of the research activities, events and deliberations regarding policy applications from this work, through the Representing Cromarty case study, rely upon the participation of the organisations listed. This collaboration is amongst practitioners, third sector organisations and the academic staff on the Representing Cromarty case study.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Evidencing Health & Wellbeing Challenges in Highland 
Organisation Cromarty History Society
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution We have spent time with each organisation to understand what they need and want from this research. We have incorporated those needs into our methods and project evaluation. We have put in place systems to share findings and to deposit research and artistic fieldwork materials in the regional and local archives in order to contribute to legacy beyond the life of this project. With these organisations, we are co-creating findings, final events and reporting to regional and national actors in health and wellbeing policy development. This group guides our explorations of policy applicaiotns from this work.
Collaborator Contribution NHS Highland - health statistics; staff participation at all levels from CE to those delivering primary care. Three staff sit on our Evidencing Challenges Group - see below. The HIghland Council - assistance with area analysis of 2011 census materials; discussion of key local and regional issues and exploration of those via in house systems; archive materials provided for video by Am Baile; participation by Ward Manager and local Councillors. Cath King, Health Improvement Policy Manager, serves on our Evidencing Challenges Group - see below. High Life Highland - Mark Richardson, the Principal Adult and Youth Services Manager serves on our Evidencing Challenges Group. Wanda Mackay, Black Isle Youth Development Officer and Fraser Thomson, Assistant Youth Worker are our key co-producers. The Highland Archive Centre - also part of High Life Highland - delivery or archive exhibition; training event for local history co-producers; on-going support for 8 -14 participants in archive research aspect of work. Was already signed up to project at grant application stage. Agreed to archive more sensitive project materials, at end of work. Advised on accession aspects of Informed Consent process. Provided day event for Archive Group, 2014. Further event in 2016 planned. Access to archive materials. Cromarty & District Community Council Presentation made at start. Provided with news updates. Post news items on their website sometimes. Formal links only, due to their heavy workload. Publicised the project, at the outset. The previous Chair was due to open the Islands in the Stream Exhibition last year, but sadly had to resign due to ill health, very suddenly. Cromarty Arts Trust Chair and staff provided early contacts, thoughts on project and continued advice on activities and contacts. Provided 'found materials' in the form of photos of past activities, and descriptions of them and their relevance to the project. Cromarty History Society Chair provides support and guidance. Guided Walk round the town, by Chair (videoed) and interview. This group recruited members to our project Archive Group. Presentations by two of those Archive group members to History Society were videoed. The visit to Highland Archive Centre contributed to these members' research for their talks. Provision of photos and past research reports - found materials. Cromarty Courthouse Museum Via David Alston, it was arranged at the start, that appropriate project materials would be deposited in their archive. Provision of local archiving for project materials. Key informant interview scheduled with archivist about broader project aims. Phone discussion with same, 2014, and sit down chat in Exhib, 2015. Found materials. Cromarty Image Library On-line access is public. Keeper of this collection has provided phone support and permissions for use of very many archive images in the Opening Thoughts video and creative activities. Friends of Hugh Miller Via Secretary and attendance at illustrated talks and AGMs. Participation of RA, alongside several residents, in RSGS Cruise of Betsey project. Invited to exhibit Opening Thoughts video at 3 day 'We Are Cromarty' art exhib and events programme. Townlands Sanctuary - now Cromarty Cares Project Input on care crisis in area and actions being taken to tackle that. Presentation to Committee, 2014. Advice on distance meeting options via IT. Provision of group plans and documents by Secretary. Support of Islands in Stream bid by group. Committee member attends our Evidencing Group. Discussion of group sessions on creative activities in progress. Cromarty Reading Group Advice from Librarian and one Reading group liaison member. Sessions based on fiction and wellbeing effects of libraries planned. One meet 2015, to plan future activities. Progress delayed by usual librarian being on maternity leave and change in group membership. 2016 activities under discussion. Cromarty Youth Cafe Project activities integrated into CYC regular schedule. Attendances c 20 - 30. Nine activity sessions, 2015, inc Exhib. CYC led on format, marketing and delivery of Islands in the Stream Exhib & Events. Nine activity sessions, 2016. The Fourways Club Project activities integrated into Fourways regular schedule. Attendances c 25-30. Three activity sessions in 2015; same in 2016. Many members attended Islands in Stream Drop In activities too. The Archive Group Group created by us for project work. 6 active members; 3 others interested. 2 activities in 2014; 1 in 2016. Evidencing Health & Wellbeing Challenges in Highland Group created by us for project work. Group comprises local and regional NHS, Highland Council, High Life Highland, Highland Children's Forum & Third Sector staff/ volunteers. Four audio recorded Roundtable discussions (2.5 hours); planned testing of methods, as legacy activity. Evidencing needs of members are added to our process and outputs, as an additional form of co-production.
Impact All of the research activities, events and deliberations regarding policy applications from this work, through the Representing Cromarty case study, rely upon the participation of the organisations listed. This collaboration is amongst practitioners, third sector organisations and the academic staff on the Representing Cromarty case study.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Evidencing Health & Wellbeing Challenges in Highland 
Organisation Cromarty Image Library
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution We have spent time with each organisation to understand what they need and want from this research. We have incorporated those needs into our methods and project evaluation. We have put in place systems to share findings and to deposit research and artistic fieldwork materials in the regional and local archives in order to contribute to legacy beyond the life of this project. With these organisations, we are co-creating findings, final events and reporting to regional and national actors in health and wellbeing policy development. This group guides our explorations of policy applicaiotns from this work.
Collaborator Contribution NHS Highland - health statistics; staff participation at all levels from CE to those delivering primary care. Three staff sit on our Evidencing Challenges Group - see below. The HIghland Council - assistance with area analysis of 2011 census materials; discussion of key local and regional issues and exploration of those via in house systems; archive materials provided for video by Am Baile; participation by Ward Manager and local Councillors. Cath King, Health Improvement Policy Manager, serves on our Evidencing Challenges Group - see below. High Life Highland - Mark Richardson, the Principal Adult and Youth Services Manager serves on our Evidencing Challenges Group. Wanda Mackay, Black Isle Youth Development Officer and Fraser Thomson, Assistant Youth Worker are our key co-producers. The Highland Archive Centre - also part of High Life Highland - delivery or archive exhibition; training event for local history co-producers; on-going support for 8 -14 participants in archive research aspect of work. Was already signed up to project at grant application stage. Agreed to archive more sensitive project materials, at end of work. Advised on accession aspects of Informed Consent process. Provided day event for Archive Group, 2014. Further event in 2016 planned. Access to archive materials. Cromarty & District Community Council Presentation made at start. Provided with news updates. Post news items on their website sometimes. Formal links only, due to their heavy workload. Publicised the project, at the outset. The previous Chair was due to open the Islands in the Stream Exhibition last year, but sadly had to resign due to ill health, very suddenly. Cromarty Arts Trust Chair and staff provided early contacts, thoughts on project and continued advice on activities and contacts. Provided 'found materials' in the form of photos of past activities, and descriptions of them and their relevance to the project. Cromarty History Society Chair provides support and guidance. Guided Walk round the town, by Chair (videoed) and interview. This group recruited members to our project Archive Group. Presentations by two of those Archive group members to History Society were videoed. The visit to Highland Archive Centre contributed to these members' research for their talks. Provision of photos and past research reports - found materials. Cromarty Courthouse Museum Via David Alston, it was arranged at the start, that appropriate project materials would be deposited in their archive. Provision of local archiving for project materials. Key informant interview scheduled with archivist about broader project aims. Phone discussion with same, 2014, and sit down chat in Exhib, 2015. Found materials. Cromarty Image Library On-line access is public. Keeper of this collection has provided phone support and permissions for use of very many archive images in the Opening Thoughts video and creative activities. Friends of Hugh Miller Via Secretary and attendance at illustrated talks and AGMs. Participation of RA, alongside several residents, in RSGS Cruise of Betsey project. Invited to exhibit Opening Thoughts video at 3 day 'We Are Cromarty' art exhib and events programme. Townlands Sanctuary - now Cromarty Cares Project Input on care crisis in area and actions being taken to tackle that. Presentation to Committee, 2014. Advice on distance meeting options via IT. Provision of group plans and documents by Secretary. Support of Islands in Stream bid by group. Committee member attends our Evidencing Group. Discussion of group sessions on creative activities in progress. Cromarty Reading Group Advice from Librarian and one Reading group liaison member. Sessions based on fiction and wellbeing effects of libraries planned. One meet 2015, to plan future activities. Progress delayed by usual librarian being on maternity leave and change in group membership. 2016 activities under discussion. Cromarty Youth Cafe Project activities integrated into CYC regular schedule. Attendances c 20 - 30. Nine activity sessions, 2015, inc Exhib. CYC led on format, marketing and delivery of Islands in the Stream Exhib & Events. Nine activity sessions, 2016. The Fourways Club Project activities integrated into Fourways regular schedule. Attendances c 25-30. Three activity sessions in 2015; same in 2016. Many members attended Islands in Stream Drop In activities too. The Archive Group Group created by us for project work. 6 active members; 3 others interested. 2 activities in 2014; 1 in 2016. Evidencing Health & Wellbeing Challenges in Highland Group created by us for project work. Group comprises local and regional NHS, Highland Council, High Life Highland, Highland Children's Forum & Third Sector staff/ volunteers. Four audio recorded Roundtable discussions (2.5 hours); planned testing of methods, as legacy activity. Evidencing needs of members are added to our process and outputs, as an additional form of co-production.
Impact All of the research activities, events and deliberations regarding policy applications from this work, through the Representing Cromarty case study, rely upon the participation of the organisations listed. This collaboration is amongst practitioners, third sector organisations and the academic staff on the Representing Cromarty case study.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Evidencing Health & Wellbeing Challenges in Highland 
Organisation Cromarty Youth Cafe
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution We have spent time with each organisation to understand what they need and want from this research. We have incorporated those needs into our methods and project evaluation. We have put in place systems to share findings and to deposit research and artistic fieldwork materials in the regional and local archives in order to contribute to legacy beyond the life of this project. With these organisations, we are co-creating findings, final events and reporting to regional and national actors in health and wellbeing policy development. This group guides our explorations of policy applicaiotns from this work.
Collaborator Contribution NHS Highland - health statistics; staff participation at all levels from CE to those delivering primary care. Three staff sit on our Evidencing Challenges Group - see below. The HIghland Council - assistance with area analysis of 2011 census materials; discussion of key local and regional issues and exploration of those via in house systems; archive materials provided for video by Am Baile; participation by Ward Manager and local Councillors. Cath King, Health Improvement Policy Manager, serves on our Evidencing Challenges Group - see below. High Life Highland - Mark Richardson, the Principal Adult and Youth Services Manager serves on our Evidencing Challenges Group. Wanda Mackay, Black Isle Youth Development Officer and Fraser Thomson, Assistant Youth Worker are our key co-producers. The Highland Archive Centre - also part of High Life Highland - delivery or archive exhibition; training event for local history co-producers; on-going support for 8 -14 participants in archive research aspect of work. Was already signed up to project at grant application stage. Agreed to archive more sensitive project materials, at end of work. Advised on accession aspects of Informed Consent process. Provided day event for Archive Group, 2014. Further event in 2016 planned. Access to archive materials. Cromarty & District Community Council Presentation made at start. Provided with news updates. Post news items on their website sometimes. Formal links only, due to their heavy workload. Publicised the project, at the outset. The previous Chair was due to open the Islands in the Stream Exhibition last year, but sadly had to resign due to ill health, very suddenly. Cromarty Arts Trust Chair and staff provided early contacts, thoughts on project and continued advice on activities and contacts. Provided 'found materials' in the form of photos of past activities, and descriptions of them and their relevance to the project. Cromarty History Society Chair provides support and guidance. Guided Walk round the town, by Chair (videoed) and interview. This group recruited members to our project Archive Group. Presentations by two of those Archive group members to History Society were videoed. The visit to Highland Archive Centre contributed to these members' research for their talks. Provision of photos and past research reports - found materials. Cromarty Courthouse Museum Via David Alston, it was arranged at the start, that appropriate project materials would be deposited in their archive. Provision of local archiving for project materials. Key informant interview scheduled with archivist about broader project aims. Phone discussion with same, 2014, and sit down chat in Exhib, 2015. Found materials. Cromarty Image Library On-line access is public. Keeper of this collection has provided phone support and permissions for use of very many archive images in the Opening Thoughts video and creative activities. Friends of Hugh Miller Via Secretary and attendance at illustrated talks and AGMs. Participation of RA, alongside several residents, in RSGS Cruise of Betsey project. Invited to exhibit Opening Thoughts video at 3 day 'We Are Cromarty' art exhib and events programme. Townlands Sanctuary - now Cromarty Cares Project Input on care crisis in area and actions being taken to tackle that. Presentation to Committee, 2014. Advice on distance meeting options via IT. Provision of group plans and documents by Secretary. Support of Islands in Stream bid by group. Committee member attends our Evidencing Group. Discussion of group sessions on creative activities in progress. Cromarty Reading Group Advice from Librarian and one Reading group liaison member. Sessions based on fiction and wellbeing effects of libraries planned. One meet 2015, to plan future activities. Progress delayed by usual librarian being on maternity leave and change in group membership. 2016 activities under discussion. Cromarty Youth Cafe Project activities integrated into CYC regular schedule. Attendances c 20 - 30. Nine activity sessions, 2015, inc Exhib. CYC led on format, marketing and delivery of Islands in the Stream Exhib & Events. Nine activity sessions, 2016. The Fourways Club Project activities integrated into Fourways regular schedule. Attendances c 25-30. Three activity sessions in 2015; same in 2016. Many members attended Islands in Stream Drop In activities too. The Archive Group Group created by us for project work. 6 active members; 3 others interested. 2 activities in 2014; 1 in 2016. Evidencing Health & Wellbeing Challenges in Highland Group created by us for project work. Group comprises local and regional NHS, Highland Council, High Life Highland, Highland Children's Forum & Third Sector staff/ volunteers. Four audio recorded Roundtable discussions (2.5 hours); planned testing of methods, as legacy activity. Evidencing needs of members are added to our process and outputs, as an additional form of co-production.
Impact All of the research activities, events and deliberations regarding policy applications from this work, through the Representing Cromarty case study, rely upon the participation of the organisations listed. This collaboration is amongst practitioners, third sector organisations and the academic staff on the Representing Cromarty case study.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Evidencing Health & Wellbeing Challenges in Highland 
Organisation Friends of Hugh Miller
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution We have spent time with each organisation to understand what they need and want from this research. We have incorporated those needs into our methods and project evaluation. We have put in place systems to share findings and to deposit research and artistic fieldwork materials in the regional and local archives in order to contribute to legacy beyond the life of this project. With these organisations, we are co-creating findings, final events and reporting to regional and national actors in health and wellbeing policy development. This group guides our explorations of policy applicaiotns from this work.
Collaborator Contribution NHS Highland - health statistics; staff participation at all levels from CE to those delivering primary care. Three staff sit on our Evidencing Challenges Group - see below. The HIghland Council - assistance with area analysis of 2011 census materials; discussion of key local and regional issues and exploration of those via in house systems; archive materials provided for video by Am Baile; participation by Ward Manager and local Councillors. Cath King, Health Improvement Policy Manager, serves on our Evidencing Challenges Group - see below. High Life Highland - Mark Richardson, the Principal Adult and Youth Services Manager serves on our Evidencing Challenges Group. Wanda Mackay, Black Isle Youth Development Officer and Fraser Thomson, Assistant Youth Worker are our key co-producers. The Highland Archive Centre - also part of High Life Highland - delivery or archive exhibition; training event for local history co-producers; on-going support for 8 -14 participants in archive research aspect of work. Was already signed up to project at grant application stage. Agreed to archive more sensitive project materials, at end of work. Advised on accession aspects of Informed Consent process. Provided day event for Archive Group, 2014. Further event in 2016 planned. Access to archive materials. Cromarty & District Community Council Presentation made at start. Provided with news updates. Post news items on their website sometimes. Formal links only, due to their heavy workload. Publicised the project, at the outset. The previous Chair was due to open the Islands in the Stream Exhibition last year, but sadly had to resign due to ill health, very suddenly. Cromarty Arts Trust Chair and staff provided early contacts, thoughts on project and continued advice on activities and contacts. Provided 'found materials' in the form of photos of past activities, and descriptions of them and their relevance to the project. Cromarty History Society Chair provides support and guidance. Guided Walk round the town, by Chair (videoed) and interview. This group recruited members to our project Archive Group. Presentations by two of those Archive group members to History Society were videoed. The visit to Highland Archive Centre contributed to these members' research for their talks. Provision of photos and past research reports - found materials. Cromarty Courthouse Museum Via David Alston, it was arranged at the start, that appropriate project materials would be deposited in their archive. Provision of local archiving for project materials. Key informant interview scheduled with archivist about broader project aims. Phone discussion with same, 2014, and sit down chat in Exhib, 2015. Found materials. Cromarty Image Library On-line access is public. Keeper of this collection has provided phone support and permissions for use of very many archive images in the Opening Thoughts video and creative activities. Friends of Hugh Miller Via Secretary and attendance at illustrated talks and AGMs. Participation of RA, alongside several residents, in RSGS Cruise of Betsey project. Invited to exhibit Opening Thoughts video at 3 day 'We Are Cromarty' art exhib and events programme. Townlands Sanctuary - now Cromarty Cares Project Input on care crisis in area and actions being taken to tackle that. Presentation to Committee, 2014. Advice on distance meeting options via IT. Provision of group plans and documents by Secretary. Support of Islands in Stream bid by group. Committee member attends our Evidencing Group. Discussion of group sessions on creative activities in progress. Cromarty Reading Group Advice from Librarian and one Reading group liaison member. Sessions based on fiction and wellbeing effects of libraries planned. One meet 2015, to plan future activities. Progress delayed by usual librarian being on maternity leave and change in group membership. 2016 activities under discussion. Cromarty Youth Cafe Project activities integrated into CYC regular schedule. Attendances c 20 - 30. Nine activity sessions, 2015, inc Exhib. CYC led on format, marketing and delivery of Islands in the Stream Exhib & Events. Nine activity sessions, 2016. The Fourways Club Project activities integrated into Fourways regular schedule. Attendances c 25-30. Three activity sessions in 2015; same in 2016. Many members attended Islands in Stream Drop In activities too. The Archive Group Group created by us for project work. 6 active members; 3 others interested. 2 activities in 2014; 1 in 2016. Evidencing Health & Wellbeing Challenges in Highland Group created by us for project work. Group comprises local and regional NHS, Highland Council, High Life Highland, Highland Children's Forum & Third Sector staff/ volunteers. Four audio recorded Roundtable discussions (2.5 hours); planned testing of methods, as legacy activity. Evidencing needs of members are added to our process and outputs, as an additional form of co-production.
Impact All of the research activities, events and deliberations regarding policy applications from this work, through the Representing Cromarty case study, rely upon the participation of the organisations listed. This collaboration is amongst practitioners, third sector organisations and the academic staff on the Representing Cromarty case study.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Evidencing Health & Wellbeing Challenges in Highland 
Organisation High Life Highland Archive Service
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution We have spent time with each organisation to understand what they need and want from this research. We have incorporated those needs into our methods and project evaluation. We have put in place systems to share findings and to deposit research and artistic fieldwork materials in the regional and local archives in order to contribute to legacy beyond the life of this project. With these organisations, we are co-creating findings, final events and reporting to regional and national actors in health and wellbeing policy development. This group guides our explorations of policy applicaiotns from this work.
Collaborator Contribution NHS Highland - health statistics; staff participation at all levels from CE to those delivering primary care. Three staff sit on our Evidencing Challenges Group - see below. The HIghland Council - assistance with area analysis of 2011 census materials; discussion of key local and regional issues and exploration of those via in house systems; archive materials provided for video by Am Baile; participation by Ward Manager and local Councillors. Cath King, Health Improvement Policy Manager, serves on our Evidencing Challenges Group - see below. High Life Highland - Mark Richardson, the Principal Adult and Youth Services Manager serves on our Evidencing Challenges Group. Wanda Mackay, Black Isle Youth Development Officer and Fraser Thomson, Assistant Youth Worker are our key co-producers. The Highland Archive Centre - also part of High Life Highland - delivery or archive exhibition; training event for local history co-producers; on-going support for 8 -14 participants in archive research aspect of work. Was already signed up to project at grant application stage. Agreed to archive more sensitive project materials, at end of work. Advised on accession aspects of Informed Consent process. Provided day event for Archive Group, 2014. Further event in 2016 planned. Access to archive materials. Cromarty & District Community Council Presentation made at start. Provided with news updates. Post news items on their website sometimes. Formal links only, due to their heavy workload. Publicised the project, at the outset. The previous Chair was due to open the Islands in the Stream Exhibition last year, but sadly had to resign due to ill health, very suddenly. Cromarty Arts Trust Chair and staff provided early contacts, thoughts on project and continued advice on activities and contacts. Provided 'found materials' in the form of photos of past activities, and descriptions of them and their relevance to the project. Cromarty History Society Chair provides support and guidance. Guided Walk round the town, by Chair (videoed) and interview. This group recruited members to our project Archive Group. Presentations by two of those Archive group members to History Society were videoed. The visit to Highland Archive Centre contributed to these members' research for their talks. Provision of photos and past research reports - found materials. Cromarty Courthouse Museum Via David Alston, it was arranged at the start, that appropriate project materials would be deposited in their archive. Provision of local archiving for project materials. Key informant interview scheduled with archivist about broader project aims. Phone discussion with same, 2014, and sit down chat in Exhib, 2015. Found materials. Cromarty Image Library On-line access is public. Keeper of this collection has provided phone support and permissions for use of very many archive images in the Opening Thoughts video and creative activities. Friends of Hugh Miller Via Secretary and attendance at illustrated talks and AGMs. Participation of RA, alongside several residents, in RSGS Cruise of Betsey project. Invited to exhibit Opening Thoughts video at 3 day 'We Are Cromarty' art exhib and events programme. Townlands Sanctuary - now Cromarty Cares Project Input on care crisis in area and actions being taken to tackle that. Presentation to Committee, 2014. Advice on distance meeting options via IT. Provision of group plans and documents by Secretary. Support of Islands in Stream bid by group. Committee member attends our Evidencing Group. Discussion of group sessions on creative activities in progress. Cromarty Reading Group Advice from Librarian and one Reading group liaison member. Sessions based on fiction and wellbeing effects of libraries planned. One meet 2015, to plan future activities. Progress delayed by usual librarian being on maternity leave and change in group membership. 2016 activities under discussion. Cromarty Youth Cafe Project activities integrated into CYC regular schedule. Attendances c 20 - 30. Nine activity sessions, 2015, inc Exhib. CYC led on format, marketing and delivery of Islands in the Stream Exhib & Events. Nine activity sessions, 2016. The Fourways Club Project activities integrated into Fourways regular schedule. Attendances c 25-30. Three activity sessions in 2015; same in 2016. Many members attended Islands in Stream Drop In activities too. The Archive Group Group created by us for project work. 6 active members; 3 others interested. 2 activities in 2014; 1 in 2016. Evidencing Health & Wellbeing Challenges in Highland Group created by us for project work. Group comprises local and regional NHS, Highland Council, High Life Highland, Highland Children's Forum & Third Sector staff/ volunteers. Four audio recorded Roundtable discussions (2.5 hours); planned testing of methods, as legacy activity. Evidencing needs of members are added to our process and outputs, as an additional form of co-production.
Impact All of the research activities, events and deliberations regarding policy applications from this work, through the Representing Cromarty case study, rely upon the participation of the organisations listed. This collaboration is amongst practitioners, third sector organisations and the academic staff on the Representing Cromarty case study.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Evidencing Health & Wellbeing Challenges in Highland 
Organisation High Life Highland Black Isle Youth Services
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution We have spent time with each organisation to understand what they need and want from this research. We have incorporated those needs into our methods and project evaluation. We have put in place systems to share findings and to deposit research and artistic fieldwork materials in the regional and local archives in order to contribute to legacy beyond the life of this project. With these organisations, we are co-creating findings, final events and reporting to regional and national actors in health and wellbeing policy development. This group guides our explorations of policy applicaiotns from this work.
Collaborator Contribution NHS Highland - health statistics; staff participation at all levels from CE to those delivering primary care. Three staff sit on our Evidencing Challenges Group - see below. The HIghland Council - assistance with area analysis of 2011 census materials; discussion of key local and regional issues and exploration of those via in house systems; archive materials provided for video by Am Baile; participation by Ward Manager and local Councillors. Cath King, Health Improvement Policy Manager, serves on our Evidencing Challenges Group - see below. High Life Highland - Mark Richardson, the Principal Adult and Youth Services Manager serves on our Evidencing Challenges Group. Wanda Mackay, Black Isle Youth Development Officer and Fraser Thomson, Assistant Youth Worker are our key co-producers. The Highland Archive Centre - also part of High Life Highland - delivery or archive exhibition; training event for local history co-producers; on-going support for 8 -14 participants in archive research aspect of work. Was already signed up to project at grant application stage. Agreed to archive more sensitive project materials, at end of work. Advised on accession aspects of Informed Consent process. Provided day event for Archive Group, 2014. Further event in 2016 planned. Access to archive materials. Cromarty & District Community Council Presentation made at start. Provided with news updates. Post news items on their website sometimes. Formal links only, due to their heavy workload. Publicised the project, at the outset. The previous Chair was due to open the Islands in the Stream Exhibition last year, but sadly had to resign due to ill health, very suddenly. Cromarty Arts Trust Chair and staff provided early contacts, thoughts on project and continued advice on activities and contacts. Provided 'found materials' in the form of photos of past activities, and descriptions of them and their relevance to the project. Cromarty History Society Chair provides support and guidance. Guided Walk round the town, by Chair (videoed) and interview. This group recruited members to our project Archive Group. Presentations by two of those Archive group members to History Society were videoed. The visit to Highland Archive Centre contributed to these members' research for their talks. Provision of photos and past research reports - found materials. Cromarty Courthouse Museum Via David Alston, it was arranged at the start, that appropriate project materials would be deposited in their archive. Provision of local archiving for project materials. Key informant interview scheduled with archivist about broader project aims. Phone discussion with same, 2014, and sit down chat in Exhib, 2015. Found materials. Cromarty Image Library On-line access is public. Keeper of this collection has provided phone support and permissions for use of very many archive images in the Opening Thoughts video and creative activities. Friends of Hugh Miller Via Secretary and attendance at illustrated talks and AGMs. Participation of RA, alongside several residents, in RSGS Cruise of Betsey project. Invited to exhibit Opening Thoughts video at 3 day 'We Are Cromarty' art exhib and events programme. Townlands Sanctuary - now Cromarty Cares Project Input on care crisis in area and actions being taken to tackle that. Presentation to Committee, 2014. Advice on distance meeting options via IT. Provision of group plans and documents by Secretary. Support of Islands in Stream bid by group. Committee member attends our Evidencing Group. Discussion of group sessions on creative activities in progress. Cromarty Reading Group Advice from Librarian and one Reading group liaison member. Sessions based on fiction and wellbeing effects of libraries planned. One meet 2015, to plan future activities. Progress delayed by usual librarian being on maternity leave and change in group membership. 2016 activities under discussion. Cromarty Youth Cafe Project activities integrated into CYC regular schedule. Attendances c 20 - 30. Nine activity sessions, 2015, inc Exhib. CYC led on format, marketing and delivery of Islands in the Stream Exhib & Events. Nine activity sessions, 2016. The Fourways Club Project activities integrated into Fourways regular schedule. Attendances c 25-30. Three activity sessions in 2015; same in 2016. Many members attended Islands in Stream Drop In activities too. The Archive Group Group created by us for project work. 6 active members; 3 others interested. 2 activities in 2014; 1 in 2016. Evidencing Health & Wellbeing Challenges in Highland Group created by us for project work. Group comprises local and regional NHS, Highland Council, High Life Highland, Highland Children's Forum & Third Sector staff/ volunteers. Four audio recorded Roundtable discussions (2.5 hours); planned testing of methods, as legacy activity. Evidencing needs of members are added to our process and outputs, as an additional form of co-production.
Impact All of the research activities, events and deliberations regarding policy applications from this work, through the Representing Cromarty case study, rely upon the participation of the organisations listed. This collaboration is amongst practitioners, third sector organisations and the academic staff on the Representing Cromarty case study.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Evidencing Health & Wellbeing Challenges in Highland 
Organisation Highland Children's Forum
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution We have spent time with each organisation to understand what they need and want from this research. We have incorporated those needs into our methods and project evaluation. We have put in place systems to share findings and to deposit research and artistic fieldwork materials in the regional and local archives in order to contribute to legacy beyond the life of this project. With these organisations, we are co-creating findings, final events and reporting to regional and national actors in health and wellbeing policy development. This group guides our explorations of policy applicaiotns from this work.
Collaborator Contribution NHS Highland - health statistics; staff participation at all levels from CE to those delivering primary care. Three staff sit on our Evidencing Challenges Group - see below. The HIghland Council - assistance with area analysis of 2011 census materials; discussion of key local and regional issues and exploration of those via in house systems; archive materials provided for video by Am Baile; participation by Ward Manager and local Councillors. Cath King, Health Improvement Policy Manager, serves on our Evidencing Challenges Group - see below. High Life Highland - Mark Richardson, the Principal Adult and Youth Services Manager serves on our Evidencing Challenges Group. Wanda Mackay, Black Isle Youth Development Officer and Fraser Thomson, Assistant Youth Worker are our key co-producers. The Highland Archive Centre - also part of High Life Highland - delivery or archive exhibition; training event for local history co-producers; on-going support for 8 -14 participants in archive research aspect of work. Was already signed up to project at grant application stage. Agreed to archive more sensitive project materials, at end of work. Advised on accession aspects of Informed Consent process. Provided day event for Archive Group, 2014. Further event in 2016 planned. Access to archive materials. Cromarty & District Community Council Presentation made at start. Provided with news updates. Post news items on their website sometimes. Formal links only, due to their heavy workload. Publicised the project, at the outset. The previous Chair was due to open the Islands in the Stream Exhibition last year, but sadly had to resign due to ill health, very suddenly. Cromarty Arts Trust Chair and staff provided early contacts, thoughts on project and continued advice on activities and contacts. Provided 'found materials' in the form of photos of past activities, and descriptions of them and their relevance to the project. Cromarty History Society Chair provides support and guidance. Guided Walk round the town, by Chair (videoed) and interview. This group recruited members to our project Archive Group. Presentations by two of those Archive group members to History Society were videoed. The visit to Highland Archive Centre contributed to these members' research for their talks. Provision of photos and past research reports - found materials. Cromarty Courthouse Museum Via David Alston, it was arranged at the start, that appropriate project materials would be deposited in their archive. Provision of local archiving for project materials. Key informant interview scheduled with archivist about broader project aims. Phone discussion with same, 2014, and sit down chat in Exhib, 2015. Found materials. Cromarty Image Library On-line access is public. Keeper of this collection has provided phone support and permissions for use of very many archive images in the Opening Thoughts video and creative activities. Friends of Hugh Miller Via Secretary and attendance at illustrated talks and AGMs. Participation of RA, alongside several residents, in RSGS Cruise of Betsey project. Invited to exhibit Opening Thoughts video at 3 day 'We Are Cromarty' art exhib and events programme. Townlands Sanctuary - now Cromarty Cares Project Input on care crisis in area and actions being taken to tackle that. Presentation to Committee, 2014. Advice on distance meeting options via IT. Provision of group plans and documents by Secretary. Support of Islands in Stream bid by group. Committee member attends our Evidencing Group. Discussion of group sessions on creative activities in progress. Cromarty Reading Group Advice from Librarian and one Reading group liaison member. Sessions based on fiction and wellbeing effects of libraries planned. One meet 2015, to plan future activities. Progress delayed by usual librarian being on maternity leave and change in group membership. 2016 activities under discussion. Cromarty Youth Cafe Project activities integrated into CYC regular schedule. Attendances c 20 - 30. Nine activity sessions, 2015, inc Exhib. CYC led on format, marketing and delivery of Islands in the Stream Exhib & Events. Nine activity sessions, 2016. The Fourways Club Project activities integrated into Fourways regular schedule. Attendances c 25-30. Three activity sessions in 2015; same in 2016. Many members attended Islands in Stream Drop In activities too. The Archive Group Group created by us for project work. 6 active members; 3 others interested. 2 activities in 2014; 1 in 2016. Evidencing Health & Wellbeing Challenges in Highland Group created by us for project work. Group comprises local and regional NHS, Highland Council, High Life Highland, Highland Children's Forum & Third Sector staff/ volunteers. Four audio recorded Roundtable discussions (2.5 hours); planned testing of methods, as legacy activity. Evidencing needs of members are added to our process and outputs, as an additional form of co-production.
Impact All of the research activities, events and deliberations regarding policy applications from this work, through the Representing Cromarty case study, rely upon the participation of the organisations listed. This collaboration is amongst practitioners, third sector organisations and the academic staff on the Representing Cromarty case study.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Evidencing Health & Wellbeing Challenges in Highland 
Organisation Highland Council
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution We have spent time with each organisation to understand what they need and want from this research. We have incorporated those needs into our methods and project evaluation. We have put in place systems to share findings and to deposit research and artistic fieldwork materials in the regional and local archives in order to contribute to legacy beyond the life of this project. With these organisations, we are co-creating findings, final events and reporting to regional and national actors in health and wellbeing policy development. This group guides our explorations of policy applicaiotns from this work.
Collaborator Contribution NHS Highland - health statistics; staff participation at all levels from CE to those delivering primary care. Three staff sit on our Evidencing Challenges Group - see below. The HIghland Council - assistance with area analysis of 2011 census materials; discussion of key local and regional issues and exploration of those via in house systems; archive materials provided for video by Am Baile; participation by Ward Manager and local Councillors. Cath King, Health Improvement Policy Manager, serves on our Evidencing Challenges Group - see below. High Life Highland - Mark Richardson, the Principal Adult and Youth Services Manager serves on our Evidencing Challenges Group. Wanda Mackay, Black Isle Youth Development Officer and Fraser Thomson, Assistant Youth Worker are our key co-producers. The Highland Archive Centre - also part of High Life Highland - delivery or archive exhibition; training event for local history co-producers; on-going support for 8 -14 participants in archive research aspect of work. Was already signed up to project at grant application stage. Agreed to archive more sensitive project materials, at end of work. Advised on accession aspects of Informed Consent process. Provided day event for Archive Group, 2014. Further event in 2016 planned. Access to archive materials. Cromarty & District Community Council Presentation made at start. Provided with news updates. Post news items on their website sometimes. Formal links only, due to their heavy workload. Publicised the project, at the outset. The previous Chair was due to open the Islands in the Stream Exhibition last year, but sadly had to resign due to ill health, very suddenly. Cromarty Arts Trust Chair and staff provided early contacts, thoughts on project and continued advice on activities and contacts. Provided 'found materials' in the form of photos of past activities, and descriptions of them and their relevance to the project. Cromarty History Society Chair provides support and guidance. Guided Walk round the town, by Chair (videoed) and interview. This group recruited members to our project Archive Group. Presentations by two of those Archive group members to History Society were videoed. The visit to Highland Archive Centre contributed to these members' research for their talks. Provision of photos and past research reports - found materials. Cromarty Courthouse Museum Via David Alston, it was arranged at the start, that appropriate project materials would be deposited in their archive. Provision of local archiving for project materials. Key informant interview scheduled with archivist about broader project aims. Phone discussion with same, 2014, and sit down chat in Exhib, 2015. Found materials. Cromarty Image Library On-line access is public. Keeper of this collection has provided phone support and permissions for use of very many archive images in the Opening Thoughts video and creative activities. Friends of Hugh Miller Via Secretary and attendance at illustrated talks and AGMs. Participation of RA, alongside several residents, in RSGS Cruise of Betsey project. Invited to exhibit Opening Thoughts video at 3 day 'We Are Cromarty' art exhib and events programme. Townlands Sanctuary - now Cromarty Cares Project Input on care crisis in area and actions being taken to tackle that. Presentation to Committee, 2014. Advice on distance meeting options via IT. Provision of group plans and documents by Secretary. Support of Islands in Stream bid by group. Committee member attends our Evidencing Group. Discussion of group sessions on creative activities in progress. Cromarty Reading Group Advice from Librarian and one Reading group liaison member. Sessions based on fiction and wellbeing effects of libraries planned. One meet 2015, to plan future activities. Progress delayed by usual librarian being on maternity leave and change in group membership. 2016 activities under discussion. Cromarty Youth Cafe Project activities integrated into CYC regular schedule. Attendances c 20 - 30. Nine activity sessions, 2015, inc Exhib. CYC led on format, marketing and delivery of Islands in the Stream Exhib & Events. Nine activity sessions, 2016. The Fourways Club Project activities integrated into Fourways regular schedule. Attendances c 25-30. Three activity sessions in 2015; same in 2016. Many members attended Islands in Stream Drop In activities too. The Archive Group Group created by us for project work. 6 active members; 3 others interested. 2 activities in 2014; 1 in 2016. Evidencing Health & Wellbeing Challenges in Highland Group created by us for project work. Group comprises local and regional NHS, Highland Council, High Life Highland, Highland Children's Forum & Third Sector staff/ volunteers. Four audio recorded Roundtable discussions (2.5 hours); planned testing of methods, as legacy activity. Evidencing needs of members are added to our process and outputs, as an additional form of co-production.
Impact All of the research activities, events and deliberations regarding policy applications from this work, through the Representing Cromarty case study, rely upon the participation of the organisations listed. This collaboration is amongst practitioners, third sector organisations and the academic staff on the Representing Cromarty case study.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Evidencing Health & Wellbeing Challenges in Highland 
Organisation Let's Get On With It Together Project
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Multiple 
PI Contribution We have spent time with each organisation to understand what they need and want from this research. We have incorporated those needs into our methods and project evaluation. We have put in place systems to share findings and to deposit research and artistic fieldwork materials in the regional and local archives in order to contribute to legacy beyond the life of this project. With these organisations, we are co-creating findings, final events and reporting to regional and national actors in health and wellbeing policy development. This group guides our explorations of policy applicaiotns from this work.
Collaborator Contribution NHS Highland - health statistics; staff participation at all levels from CE to those delivering primary care. Three staff sit on our Evidencing Challenges Group - see below. The HIghland Council - assistance with area analysis of 2011 census materials; discussion of key local and regional issues and exploration of those via in house systems; archive materials provided for video by Am Baile; participation by Ward Manager and local Councillors. Cath King, Health Improvement Policy Manager, serves on our Evidencing Challenges Group - see below. High Life Highland - Mark Richardson, the Principal Adult and Youth Services Manager serves on our Evidencing Challenges Group. Wanda Mackay, Black Isle Youth Development Officer and Fraser Thomson, Assistant Youth Worker are our key co-producers. The Highland Archive Centre - also part of High Life Highland - delivery or archive exhibition; training event for local history co-producers; on-going support for 8 -14 participants in archive research aspect of work. Was already signed up to project at grant application stage. Agreed to archive more sensitive project materials, at end of work. Advised on accession aspects of Informed Consent process. Provided day event for Archive Group, 2014. Further event in 2016 planned. Access to archive materials. Cromarty & District Community Council Presentation made at start. Provided with news updates. Post news items on their website sometimes. Formal links only, due to their heavy workload. Publicised the project, at the outset. The previous Chair was due to open the Islands in the Stream Exhibition last year, but sadly had to resign due to ill health, very suddenly. Cromarty Arts Trust Chair and staff provided early contacts, thoughts on project and continued advice on activities and contacts. Provided 'found materials' in the form of photos of past activities, and descriptions of them and their relevance to the project. Cromarty History Society Chair provides support and guidance. Guided Walk round the town, by Chair (videoed) and interview. This group recruited members to our project Archive Group. Presentations by two of those Archive group members to History Society were videoed. The visit to Highland Archive Centre contributed to these members' research for their talks. Provision of photos and past research reports - found materials. Cromarty Courthouse Museum Via David Alston, it was arranged at the start, that appropriate project materials would be deposited in their archive. Provision of local archiving for project materials. Key informant interview scheduled with archivist about broader project aims. Phone discussion with same, 2014, and sit down chat in Exhib, 2015. Found materials. Cromarty Image Library On-line access is public. Keeper of this collection has provided phone support and permissions for use of very many archive images in the Opening Thoughts video and creative activities. Friends of Hugh Miller Via Secretary and attendance at illustrated talks and AGMs. Participation of RA, alongside several residents, in RSGS Cruise of Betsey project. Invited to exhibit Opening Thoughts video at 3 day 'We Are Cromarty' art exhib and events programme. Townlands Sanctuary - now Cromarty Cares Project Input on care crisis in area and actions being taken to tackle that. Presentation to Committee, 2014. Advice on distance meeting options via IT. Provision of group plans and documents by Secretary. Support of Islands in Stream bid by group. Committee member attends our Evidencing Group. Discussion of group sessions on creative activities in progress. Cromarty Reading Group Advice from Librarian and one Reading group liaison member. Sessions based on fiction and wellbeing effects of libraries planned. One meet 2015, to plan future activities. Progress delayed by usual librarian being on maternity leave and change in group membership. 2016 activities under discussion. Cromarty Youth Cafe Project activities integrated into CYC regular schedule. Attendances c 20 - 30. Nine activity sessions, 2015, inc Exhib. CYC led on format, marketing and delivery of Islands in the Stream Exhib & Events. Nine activity sessions, 2016. The Fourways Club Project activities integrated into Fourways regular schedule. Attendances c 25-30. Three activity sessions in 2015; same in 2016. Many members attended Islands in Stream Drop In activities too. The Archive Group Group created by us for project work. 6 active members; 3 others interested. 2 activities in 2014; 1 in 2016. Evidencing Health & Wellbeing Challenges in Highland Group created by us for project work. Group comprises local and regional NHS, Highland Council, High Life Highland, Highland Children's Forum & Third Sector staff/ volunteers. Four audio recorded Roundtable discussions (2.5 hours); planned testing of methods, as legacy activity. Evidencing needs of members are added to our process and outputs, as an additional form of co-production.
Impact All of the research activities, events and deliberations regarding policy applications from this work, through the Representing Cromarty case study, rely upon the participation of the organisations listed. This collaboration is amongst practitioners, third sector organisations and the academic staff on the Representing Cromarty case study.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Evidencing Health & Wellbeing Challenges in Highland 
Organisation NHS Highland
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution We have spent time with each organisation to understand what they need and want from this research. We have incorporated those needs into our methods and project evaluation. We have put in place systems to share findings and to deposit research and artistic fieldwork materials in the regional and local archives in order to contribute to legacy beyond the life of this project. With these organisations, we are co-creating findings, final events and reporting to regional and national actors in health and wellbeing policy development. This group guides our explorations of policy applicaiotns from this work.
Collaborator Contribution NHS Highland - health statistics; staff participation at all levels from CE to those delivering primary care. Three staff sit on our Evidencing Challenges Group - see below. The HIghland Council - assistance with area analysis of 2011 census materials; discussion of key local and regional issues and exploration of those via in house systems; archive materials provided for video by Am Baile; participation by Ward Manager and local Councillors. Cath King, Health Improvement Policy Manager, serves on our Evidencing Challenges Group - see below. High Life Highland - Mark Richardson, the Principal Adult and Youth Services Manager serves on our Evidencing Challenges Group. Wanda Mackay, Black Isle Youth Development Officer and Fraser Thomson, Assistant Youth Worker are our key co-producers. The Highland Archive Centre - also part of High Life Highland - delivery or archive exhibition; training event for local history co-producers; on-going support for 8 -14 participants in archive research aspect of work. Was already signed up to project at grant application stage. Agreed to archive more sensitive project materials, at end of work. Advised on accession aspects of Informed Consent process. Provided day event for Archive Group, 2014. Further event in 2016 planned. Access to archive materials. Cromarty & District Community Council Presentation made at start. Provided with news updates. Post news items on their website sometimes. Formal links only, due to their heavy workload. Publicised the project, at the outset. The previous Chair was due to open the Islands in the Stream Exhibition last year, but sadly had to resign due to ill health, very suddenly. Cromarty Arts Trust Chair and staff provided early contacts, thoughts on project and continued advice on activities and contacts. Provided 'found materials' in the form of photos of past activities, and descriptions of them and their relevance to the project. Cromarty History Society Chair provides support and guidance. Guided Walk round the town, by Chair (videoed) and interview. This group recruited members to our project Archive Group. Presentations by two of those Archive group members to History Society were videoed. The visit to Highland Archive Centre contributed to these members' research for their talks. Provision of photos and past research reports - found materials. Cromarty Courthouse Museum Via David Alston, it was arranged at the start, that appropriate project materials would be deposited in their archive. Provision of local archiving for project materials. Key informant interview scheduled with archivist about broader project aims. Phone discussion with same, 2014, and sit down chat in Exhib, 2015. Found materials. Cromarty Image Library On-line access is public. Keeper of this collection has provided phone support and permissions for use of very many archive images in the Opening Thoughts video and creative activities. Friends of Hugh Miller Via Secretary and attendance at illustrated talks and AGMs. Participation of RA, alongside several residents, in RSGS Cruise of Betsey project. Invited to exhibit Opening Thoughts video at 3 day 'We Are Cromarty' art exhib and events programme. Townlands Sanctuary - now Cromarty Cares Project Input on care crisis in area and actions being taken to tackle that. Presentation to Committee, 2014. Advice on distance meeting options via IT. Provision of group plans and documents by Secretary. Support of Islands in Stream bid by group. Committee member attends our Evidencing Group. Discussion of group sessions on creative activities in progress. Cromarty Reading Group Advice from Librarian and one Reading group liaison member. Sessions based on fiction and wellbeing effects of libraries planned. One meet 2015, to plan future activities. Progress delayed by usual librarian being on maternity leave and change in group membership. 2016 activities under discussion. Cromarty Youth Cafe Project activities integrated into CYC regular schedule. Attendances c 20 - 30. Nine activity sessions, 2015, inc Exhib. CYC led on format, marketing and delivery of Islands in the Stream Exhib & Events. Nine activity sessions, 2016. The Fourways Club Project activities integrated into Fourways regular schedule. Attendances c 25-30. Three activity sessions in 2015; same in 2016. Many members attended Islands in Stream Drop In activities too. The Archive Group Group created by us for project work. 6 active members; 3 others interested. 2 activities in 2014; 1 in 2016. Evidencing Health & Wellbeing Challenges in Highland Group created by us for project work. Group comprises local and regional NHS, Highland Council, High Life Highland, Highland Children's Forum & Third Sector staff/ volunteers. Four audio recorded Roundtable discussions (2.5 hours); planned testing of methods, as legacy activity. Evidencing needs of members are added to our process and outputs, as an additional form of co-production.
Impact All of the research activities, events and deliberations regarding policy applications from this work, through the Representing Cromarty case study, rely upon the participation of the organisations listed. This collaboration is amongst practitioners, third sector organisations and the academic staff on the Representing Cromarty case study.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Evidencing Health & Wellbeing Challenges in Highland 
Organisation Ross-shire Voluntary Action
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution We have spent time with each organisation to understand what they need and want from this research. We have incorporated those needs into our methods and project evaluation. We have put in place systems to share findings and to deposit research and artistic fieldwork materials in the regional and local archives in order to contribute to legacy beyond the life of this project. With these organisations, we are co-creating findings, final events and reporting to regional and national actors in health and wellbeing policy development. This group guides our explorations of policy applicaiotns from this work.
Collaborator Contribution NHS Highland - health statistics; staff participation at all levels from CE to those delivering primary care. Three staff sit on our Evidencing Challenges Group - see below. The HIghland Council - assistance with area analysis of 2011 census materials; discussion of key local and regional issues and exploration of those via in house systems; archive materials provided for video by Am Baile; participation by Ward Manager and local Councillors. Cath King, Health Improvement Policy Manager, serves on our Evidencing Challenges Group - see below. High Life Highland - Mark Richardson, the Principal Adult and Youth Services Manager serves on our Evidencing Challenges Group. Wanda Mackay, Black Isle Youth Development Officer and Fraser Thomson, Assistant Youth Worker are our key co-producers. The Highland Archive Centre - also part of High Life Highland - delivery or archive exhibition; training event for local history co-producers; on-going support for 8 -14 participants in archive research aspect of work. Was already signed up to project at grant application stage. Agreed to archive more sensitive project materials, at end of work. Advised on accession aspects of Informed Consent process. Provided day event for Archive Group, 2014. Further event in 2016 planned. Access to archive materials. Cromarty & District Community Council Presentation made at start. Provided with news updates. Post news items on their website sometimes. Formal links only, due to their heavy workload. Publicised the project, at the outset. The previous Chair was due to open the Islands in the Stream Exhibition last year, but sadly had to resign due to ill health, very suddenly. Cromarty Arts Trust Chair and staff provided early contacts, thoughts on project and continued advice on activities and contacts. Provided 'found materials' in the form of photos of past activities, and descriptions of them and their relevance to the project. Cromarty History Society Chair provides support and guidance. Guided Walk round the town, by Chair (videoed) and interview. This group recruited members to our project Archive Group. Presentations by two of those Archive group members to History Society were videoed. The visit to Highland Archive Centre contributed to these members' research for their talks. Provision of photos and past research reports - found materials. Cromarty Courthouse Museum Via David Alston, it was arranged at the start, that appropriate project materials would be deposited in their archive. Provision of local archiving for project materials. Key informant interview scheduled with archivist about broader project aims. Phone discussion with same, 2014, and sit down chat in Exhib, 2015. Found materials. Cromarty Image Library On-line access is public. Keeper of this collection has provided phone support and permissions for use of very many archive images in the Opening Thoughts video and creative activities. Friends of Hugh Miller Via Secretary and attendance at illustrated talks and AGMs. Participation of RA, alongside several residents, in RSGS Cruise of Betsey project. Invited to exhibit Opening Thoughts video at 3 day 'We Are Cromarty' art exhib and events programme. Townlands Sanctuary - now Cromarty Cares Project Input on care crisis in area and actions being taken to tackle that. Presentation to Committee, 2014. Advice on distance meeting options via IT. Provision of group plans and documents by Secretary. Support of Islands in Stream bid by group. Committee member attends our Evidencing Group. Discussion of group sessions on creative activities in progress. Cromarty Reading Group Advice from Librarian and one Reading group liaison member. Sessions based on fiction and wellbeing effects of libraries planned. One meet 2015, to plan future activities. Progress delayed by usual librarian being on maternity leave and change in group membership. 2016 activities under discussion. Cromarty Youth Cafe Project activities integrated into CYC regular schedule. Attendances c 20 - 30. Nine activity sessions, 2015, inc Exhib. CYC led on format, marketing and delivery of Islands in the Stream Exhib & Events. Nine activity sessions, 2016. The Fourways Club Project activities integrated into Fourways regular schedule. Attendances c 25-30. Three activity sessions in 2015; same in 2016. Many members attended Islands in Stream Drop In activities too. The Archive Group Group created by us for project work. 6 active members; 3 others interested. 2 activities in 2014; 1 in 2016. Evidencing Health & Wellbeing Challenges in Highland Group created by us for project work. Group comprises local and regional NHS, Highland Council, High Life Highland, Highland Children's Forum & Third Sector staff/ volunteers. Four audio recorded Roundtable discussions (2.5 hours); planned testing of methods, as legacy activity. Evidencing needs of members are added to our process and outputs, as an additional form of co-production.
Impact All of the research activities, events and deliberations regarding policy applications from this work, through the Representing Cromarty case study, rely upon the participation of the organisations listed. This collaboration is amongst practitioners, third sector organisations and the academic staff on the Representing Cromarty case study.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Glamorgan Archives 
Organisation Glamorgan Archives
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution We have fostered community engagement work that this organisation can no longer afford to undertake
Collaborator Contribution The partner has provided expert training and support in ensuring that a local archive gains the knowledge on how to preserve, catalogue as well as continue to images, artefacts, and other materials linked to their history and heritage.
Impact - extensive visual presentation of images used in a local event on how artists from and those working extensively in Butetown has sought to represent the area - engagement with public exhibition set to take place in 2016 -established connections with local community archive and linked to that a series of sessions to train volunteers
Start Year 2015
 
Description Glasgow Life 
Organisation Glasgow Life
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Glasgow Life are a charity based organisation which manages Arts, Libraries, Museums and Sport on behalf of the City of Glasgow.
Collaborator Contribution Letter of Support offered during Bid Application stage
Impact No specific outcomes to report
Start Year 2013
 
Description HEARTH Arts and Health Organisation 
Organisation The Hearth Centre
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution £25,000 of the Hodge Hill case study budget is allocated to Hearth to fund the development of dramatic works based on the research. This includes funding for actors, resources (props and costumes), and performance costs. The Hodge Hill case study researchers (Qulsom Fazil, Jo Skelt, and Clare Barker) will contribute to the material for the eventual productions, both through providing relevant research findings and through discussion at the development stage.
Collaborator Contribution In the next research phase (in 2015), Polly Wright of Hearth will produce and stage a verbatim play based on interview data, literary analysis, and development workshops from the project.
Impact No outcomes as yet.
Start Year 2013
 
Description Highlife, Highland Archive Services 
Organisation High Life Highland Archive Service
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The Service holds considerable material relating to Cromarty and the Cromarty Firth area.
Start Year 2013
 
Description House of Le Fou Film Productions 
Organisation House of Le Fou Film Productions
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution - fostering of a partnership with a young, local film maker - cross industry research work - adding a layer of research focus
Collaborator Contribution Self confessed and (proud!) Welsh West Indian Film Producer at House of Le Fou Film Productions, dedicated to representing communities, with an interest in queer culture, race, youth empowerment, and Welsh identity. Taking the knowledge, experience, and lessons learnt from working for companies in TV, film, and the arts, House of Le Fou Film Productions was created by Producer/ Editor Tara Wyllie. Since being established she has worked with a diverse range of clients from producing comedies for BBC Cymru Wales, to short films championing equality and diversity for Diverse Cymru, whilst still at her heart is a determination to give communities a voice, pushing the boundaries of what can be achieved creatively and aesthetically in fiction, documentary, and beyond. Le Fou Productions played a major role in the work undertaken in the first year of the life of the case study. Tara's work with the Project to date includes capturing video interviews with members of the Assembly creative team, as well as the editing and producing or a short 'collective conversation' with the team exploring views of representation, community and belonging. Also captured were their views on the Assembly model as a method of community engagement. Tara also produced a film charting our engagement work with one of our community partners and their views on our work, and on the 2014 Assembly. The resulting film (Re) presenting African Caribbean Elders Society (ACES) can be viewed here. Liz Chambers, Director of Photography, captured a series of digital pictures providing another layer in which to chart the work that took place; they are spectacular
Impact - film - film shorts
Start Year 2014
 
Description Involvement in Mental Health Arts Festival 
Organisation Disability Arts Cymru
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution A member of the research team, Ellie Byrne, has been involved in the planning of a mental health arts festival in South Wales, including the project's case study area of North Merthyr Tydfil. Ellie has attended planning meetings, publicised an open meeting in Merthyr and co-ordinated the meeting which gathered stakeholder views about what the festival could look like and to identify further partners on a funding application.
Collaborator Contribution Making Minds and Disability Arts Cymru have also been co-ordinating open meetings and developing their relationship with the Arts Council who would be the funder of the festival. Disability Arts Cymru have provided translation services for publicity, and both have used their networks to increase awareness of the festival and the open meetings.
Impact This is a multi-disciplinary collaboration including the social sciences, mental health, arts, culture and community development. It is still in the early days so there are no tangible outcomes yet.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Involvement in Mental Health Arts Festival 
Organisation Making Minds
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution A member of the research team, Ellie Byrne, has been involved in the planning of a mental health arts festival in South Wales, including the project's case study area of North Merthyr Tydfil. Ellie has attended planning meetings, publicised an open meeting in Merthyr and co-ordinated the meeting which gathered stakeholder views about what the festival could look like and to identify further partners on a funding application.
Collaborator Contribution Making Minds and Disability Arts Cymru have also been co-ordinating open meetings and developing their relationship with the Arts Council who would be the funder of the festival. Disability Arts Cymru have provided translation services for publicity, and both have used their networks to increase awareness of the festival and the open meetings.
Impact This is a multi-disciplinary collaboration including the social sciences, mental health, arts, culture and community development. It is still in the early days so there are no tangible outcomes yet.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Milnbank Housing Association, Dennistoun, Glasgow 
Organisation Milnbank Housing Association
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Worked with the sheltered housing complex to involve older people in creative methods to capture narratives of health and wellbeing. Connected this group of people with groups in Cromarty. Provided creative sessions, bringing people together to tell stories and creatively engage through art. Made a lasting legacy of this aspect of the project through the making of a film about older people's experience of living in Dennistoun. This film featured in the Connected Communities Festival of 2015.
Collaborator Contribution Provided access to the participants. Contributed physical space, creative resources, and refreshments for the creative sessions. Added value of creating a strong bond between other community partners (Glasgow Life) that still exist, beyond the life of the project.
Impact A film made for the Connected Communities Festival A lasting relationship between Dennistoun Library and Milnbank Housing Association that continues to benefit MHA and other Dennistoun residents
Start Year 2014
 
Description Moray Firth Research Group 
Organisation University of the Highlands and Islands
Department UHI Centre for History
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Our presence has caused rural health and wellbeing to be added to the activities, as a key strand, being tackled by people from a range of academic disciplines, artistic practices and community history groups.
Collaborator Contribution UHI Centre for History runs the group, arranges meetings, researches possible action and provides minutes of meetings.
Impact The lead of this partnership, Dr David Worthington, has contributed current active historical research on the Moray Firth to our Representing Cromarty case study work. The group aim to create a multi-discplinary and community conference to be hosted in Dornoch in 2015/16. Disciplinary backgrounds: History; Archaeology; Physical Geography; Human Geography; Art.
Start Year 2014
 
Description NHS Highlands 
Organisation NHS Highland
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution The Community & Health Improvement Planning Department
Start Year 2013
 
Description National Theatre Wales 
Organisation National Theatre Wales
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution National Theatre Wales are a Committed Partner to the Representing Communities Project.
Start Year 2013
 
Description POSSIB 
Organisation Canolfan Soar
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Resource and in-kind contribution to collaborative activities
Collaborator Contribution Resource and in-kind contribution to collaborative activities
Impact Straeon (listed under creative outputs) Photovoice (listed under creative outputs) Merthyr Moves (listed under engagement) Memo...mono...move (listed under creative outputs)
Start Year 2014
 
Description Pearl Medical Centre 
Organisation Pearl Medical Centre
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Hospitals 
PI Contribution Pearl Medical Centre has a patient base of 10,000 with a large representation of patients from the Pakistani community.
Start Year 2013
 
Description Public Health Wales 
Organisation Public Health Wales NHS Trust
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Public Health Wales is the lead body for the delivery of public health in Wales.
Start Year 2013
 
Description Representing Dennistoun; Impact Arts 
Organisation Impact Arts
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Impact Arts is a community arts organisation based in Dennistoun. Our collaboration with them has enabled them to become more connected within the Dennistoun community and has led to a successful Lottery funding bid associated with the Representing Communities project.
Collaborator Contribution Impact Arts has been integral to putting on public engagement events that have enabled Representing Communities researchers to do data collection. Impact Arts has provided a pathway for researchers into the Dennistoun community, linking us up with other arts organisations, charities, and community groups in the area. Impact Arts will continue to work closely with us in work package 3, as we involve members of the Dennistoun community in creating art that represents their experience of living in the area
Impact Alexandra Park Festival -- putting on a temporary exhibition at this event meant that we had a community presence, made us visible to the people of Dennistoun, and enabled some data collection. A Christmas event in Dennistoun Public Library in December 2014, run by Impact Arts, will perform a similar role for us. This event shows that the Representing Dennistoun project is connecting Impact Arts with new community partners (the library).
Start Year 2013
 
Description Seannachies: Addressing Social Isolation through Storytelling 
Organisation Scottish Universities Insight Institute
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Dr Pete Seaman is a named collaborator on the project and part of the programme team. Dr Claire McKechnie-Mason has been involved with events connected with this project because there are clear overlappings with Repreenting Communities
Collaborator Contribution Seannachies has helped to develop our thinking on how storytelling is integral to our understanding of health and wellbeing, and the complex facets of issues surrounding social exclusion and isolation Seannachies has helped us to consider new ways of working with and approaching policy makers
Impact Networking & Storytelling Event, hosted by Wendy Woolfson at the Project Cafe, 134 Renfrew Street, Glasgow, G3 6ST Tuesday 14th October 7 - 9pm A light dinner and refreshments will be available One Day Orientation Workshop - The Scale of the Challenge at the Collins Gallery, 22 Richmond Street, Glasgow, G1 1XQ Wednesday 15th October, 9.30am for 10am - 4pm Unpicking a contemporary concept of Seannachies and identifying key themes, facilitated by Andrew Lyon
Start Year 2014
 
Description Story Works Wales 
Organisation Storyworks UK
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Storyworks listen to, learn from and present personal stories creatively, innovatively and sensitively. Our expertise is in gathering people's stories and presenting them in the most appropriate form for the individual, organisation and project. Most importantly, we always make sure that each individual and story we work with is treated ethically, carefully and appropriately. StoryWorks has worked with the Representing Communities Project, commissioned to develop a series of digital stories. The work is being co-designed and produced, along with the research participants
Collaborator Contribution Storyworks listen to, learn from and present personal stories creatively, innovatively and sensitively. Our expertise is in gathering people's stories and presenting them in the most appropriate form for the individual, organisation and project. Most importantly, we always make sure that each individual and story we work with is treated ethically, carefully and appropriately. StoryWorks has worked with the Representing Communities Project, commissioned to develop a series of digital stories. The work is being co-designed and produced, along with the research participants
Impact 6 digital stories are being developed and two extended digital stories. The stories are placed on the praisesongs wales website dedicated to stories by elders from minority ethnic backgrounds living in Wales http://www.wales-praisesongs.org/
Start Year 2013
 
Description The Cardiff Story 
Organisation Cardiff Story
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution - fostering links between local arts group and the museum in a UK wide study -developing public exhibition
Collaborator Contribution - fostering link between museum and local arts group in a UK wide study - space in which to host a summer seminar and outreach programme -development of a public exhibition
Impact - exhibition -seminar and outreach programme
Start Year 2014
 
Description Welsh Governent 
Organisation Government of Wales
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Cathays Park Cardiff CF10 3NQ
Start Year 2013
 
Description A Journey So Far: Remembering the Caribbean in Butetown Past and Present 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact A launch event for this case study was held on 1 July 2014. This free event - A Journey So Far: Remembering the Caribbean in Butetown - Past and Present - was developed in collaboration with the National Theatre Wales (NTW), using its Assembly model and with additional funding secured as part of the 2014 Connected Communities Festival. The aim of the event was to:
• celebrate the historical and contemporary links and emotional ties people have/have had to key places in Butetown (the churches, centres, pubs and streets)
• open up space for Caribbean migrants to reflect on the role in their lives of key places and activities in Butetown when they arrived and settled in Cardiff
• enable Caribbean migrants and their children to share the varying impact that Butetown has had on their lives over time and in changing circumstances
• give people the opportunity to share what Butetown means to them today
• explore the Assembly model as one creative, participatory approach to generating evidence about the everyday lives of communities.

Over 130 people attended the event, held at Portland House, Cardiff Bay. All attendees were asked to share seven words that encapsulated their thoughts on the evening, and these included: 'Great night, when's the next one?' and 'Bloody brilliant'. Blog entries and a summary report will follow shortly. We will continue to work with NTW.

Over 130 people attended the event, held at Portland House, Cardiff Bay. All attendees were asked to share seven words that encapsulated their thoughts on the evening, and these included: 'Great night, when's the next one?' and 'Bloody brilliant'. Blog entries and a summary report will follow shortly. We will continue to work NTW. The event allowed us to introduce the aims of the project and begin to work more closely with Caribbean elders and people with links to Butetown. It also developed further a model of engagement, with a focus on exploring notions of (re) presentations, community and belonging.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://representingcommunities.co.uk/butetown/2014/07/01/remembering-the-caribbean-in-butetown/
 
Description A Journey so far: Caribbeans in Butetown (The Assembly) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact Performance-based debate exploring personal and collective histories of the Caribbean migratory experience, and to what extent they shape the everyday lives, health and well-being of Caribbean elders. The launch event was held 1st July 2014, in collaboration with the National Theatre Wales (NTW). The NTW Assembly model is rooted in a performance debate that responds to a local issue in a creative setting. It can be described further as a community-led dramatic experience that nurtures an exploration of one or several issues important to the local community; space is left during the performance for the audience to debate and react.
Celebrate the historical and contemporary links and emotional ties people have/ have had to key places in Butetown (the churches, centres, pubs and streets);
Open up space for Caribbean migrants to reflect on the role key places and activities in Butetown may have on their lives when they arrived and settled in Cardiff
Give people space to share what 'Butetown' means to them today.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description A Tolerant Nation? (book launch, USW) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The Launch event (December 2015) was an opportunity to celebrate this new publication, for contributors to discuss their chapters and for participants to shape the critical conversations necessary to move the debate forward.
Brought together practitioners, research and policy communities.
Explored key themes emerging from the publication, revealing possible ways in which the work can be developed.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Alexandra Park Festival, Glasgow 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Public engagement event held in Alexandra Park to publicise our project and collect data about what people think about living and working in Dennistoun. We gained valuable contacts in the community through this event and we gathered responses to research we have done on existing representations of Glasgow in literature and film.

After the event, we were able to use contacts we'd made to forge new links with the community. We used the data collection to make a prezi that we presented at the Connected Communities Festival in Cardiff in July 2014.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.impactarts.co.uk/news/representing-dennistoun-/representing-dennistoun-week-4/
 
Description Banner march and performance 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Workshops and banner march raised profile of the arts and humanities and their role in community action

members of the public were really interested in the march and exhibition that followed it;
teachers felt that the banner march was an enjoyable and meaningful activity for the pupils;
a film is now being made about the workshops and march, co-produced by pupils and the film makers;
we have had interest in participation in the rest of the project from schools and artists.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Big Arts Picnic, Ward End Park 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The Hodge Hill case study research team (Qulsom Fazil, Jo Skelt and Clare Barker) had a stall at the Big Arts Picnic in Ward End Park, Birmingham, on 2 June 2014. The purpose of this was to raise awareness of the case study research in the local community, to attract research participants, and to generate some research data. Maps of Hodge Hill and Mirpur, Pakistan were used to stimulate discussion of migration and place attachments, and participants were asked to write short blurbs about what particular places meant to them.
This activity generated interest in some community members, enabled us to disseminate information to local stakeholders (e.g. the local councillor), helped with recruitment of interviewees, and enabled us to connect with other local projects in the area.

No tangible impacts to date.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.birmingham-rep.co.uk/news/big-arts-picnic-set-for-ward-end-park/
 
Description British Academy Debate 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The Debate was to engage with an audience and spark further discussions and debates.

A video of the Debate is available and has been placed in the public domain we hope this will encourage people to visit our website and enhance the visibility of the Representing Communities Website
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.britac.ac.uk/events/2015/Social_and_Economic_Change_and_Well-being.cfm
 
Description Butetown Carnival Memories 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Screening of documentary with community members provided opportunity for Community to see itself and for others to share glimpses of that history.
Positive reminiscence
Visibility
Networking
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Co-Production: Creating Social Justice through Research - AHRC Social Justice Symposium 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact The Symposium was an opportunity to discuss Co-Production

Gareth Williams and Sue Cohen are exploring the development of learning spaces in cities to explore Praxis as part of the Productive Margins project; and exploring possibilities of a Special Issue on this with the E.A.R. Journal
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
URL http://connected-communities.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/Social-Justice-Symposium-Nov-4-6th-2013....
 
Description Community presentation 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Glasgow Life invited us to give a presentation to the general public at an event at the St Mungo's Museum in Glasgow. This event sparked questions and discussions afterwards and increased awareness of our work in the local area.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015,2016
 
Description Conference Session Chair: Archiving Matters - True North Conference 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Conference Session Chair: Archiving Matters: a round table discussion on archiving values and practices with presentations by Lewis-based artist Jon MacLeod, Referendum Curator Amy Todman, artist Nicky Bird, and Timespan's Archive Development Manager Jo Clemens. True North Conference: Recording the past, the present and the future - organised by Timespan, as part of their Creative Places Award events programme, 5th - 7th March, Helmsdale.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://timespan.org.uk/true-north-conference/
 
Description Connected Communities Festival Creative Working Group 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Formed a creative working group of sheltered housing residents to connect with older people in the Cromarty case study. This led to the making of a film which contributed to the Connected Communities Festival in 2015.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Connecting Epistemologies 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact I participated in the Connecting Epitemologies event in London in October 2014. The presentations given sparked a great deal of discussion and enabled new networks with the Connected Communities group to form

New networks formed
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://earlycareerresearchers.wordpress.com/
 
Description Cromarty Archive Group 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact This group was created in order to carry out co-created archive research, as an element in our deep mapping methodology. The group has so far met twice. The first event together was to discuss the project aims and to watch our Opening Thoughts video, as a provocation to co-creating a different kind of video, later in the project. The second event was a visit to The Highland Archive Centre, where the archivists provided an induction into uses the resources there, and a display of materials relevant to the case study area. Two members of this group then gave illustrated talks at Cromarty History Society. The content was augmented by the archive visit. Two further meetings are planned for 2016.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Cromarty Connections: Where We Play 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Cromarty Youth Café Outdoor event: GPS Tracked Easter Egg Treasure Hunt, using map legends from Cromarty Youth Café drawn maps.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Cromarty Dreaming 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Cromarty DreamING
Making our deep map dreams
Exhibition; Cromarty Dreaming Giant Post Box; Drop In activities - Post a Dream; Cromarty Connections (dot maps, migration story; key places); Drawing Likes & Dislikes; Wall Panel additions/ input.

Included other, nested, activties as follows:
28th June - Cromarty Carers Session - Thinging Through Care - contributing to 'How Cromarty Cares' wall panel.
29th June & 6/7th July - Evidencing Group Sessions - One-to-one audio recording of group members' project experiences; participation in Drop In activities; session on living with dementia; considerations on benefits of process.
30th June - Cromarty Primary School Dreaming - Making Dreams; Drawing Likes & Dislikes; Posting our Dreams
30th June - Fourways Club Dreaming - Unpacking Crom in a Jar; memories & feedback on Representing Cromarty involvement; thoughts on own key findings; wall panel input.
1st July - Our Migration Stories II - Group discussion on migration stories & dreams (audio recorded). Participation in Drop In activities; input into Migration Stories Wall Panel.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Dennistoun Community Council presentation 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Dennistoun Community Council invited us to attend and present at one of their meetings to reflect on what we had learnt through the project and to discuss the legacy of the work. We gathered some important suggestions on where this work could go next and captured some feedback on our research activities.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Dissemination event at Asian Elders Centre 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact 30 people attended a dissemination event showcasing the Poems created by the Pakistani mens poetry group. THe poems were read out and the work was introduced and showcased.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Experiments in Co-production 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This was part of a series of workshops exploring co-productive research and engagement processes. We discussed the People's Platform which was a collaboration between the project team and participants, National Theatre Wales, Common Wealth and POSSIB.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Glasgow Life staff event 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Drs Seaman and Mckechnie-Mason presented for around 50 minutes, including 10 minutes of showing films made for the Celebrate Exhibition, to staff at Glasgow Life, the arms length body that controls publicly owned sports and cultural venues in the city of Glasgow. This includes museums and art galleries such as Kelvingrove Art Galleries and Museum, Tramway and the Burrell Collection. . Following this, we opened the floor to discussion and there was a general consensus that the methods and theoretical framework of Representing Communities resonated with many attendees. Points of intersection with the audience included the empowering quality of being able to represent oneself, the responsibility of holding and promoting certain stories and how this becomes a live issues in choices made by museums around what they collect for the city. There was also discussion of how stories could be used to inspire more creative data collection methods beyond questionnaire data.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Health Humanities at UHI and the emergent Fifth Wave in public health 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact The aim of the series of talks and discussions which I am presenting in this forum is help lab and hospital based researchers from 'hard science' and medical disciplines to understand how and why arts, humanities and participatory research methods are needed as part of a broad effort to inform and create new kinds of health policy and practice and to clarify what academic rigour means and looks like within those disciplines.

During the first session it was discovered that none of these medical and lab science researchers had encountered any discussion of epistemologies and ontologies during their academic careers. This means that no matter how much they like what arts and humanities researchers are doing and agree with the need for research on those topics they have no conceptual framework with which to understand how that might relate to their own research - or how it could be considered to be serious research at all. Our aim is hence to continue these talks on a quarterly basis with the aim of helping everyone attending to 'map' their own research positionality, and related methods, through a broader understanding of the history of science, medical science and social sciences allied to a discussion of the challenges posited by Hanlon et al for collective creation of a civically engaged fifth wave in health policy.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description How Cromarty Cares 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact End of project exhibition and events. Certificates of Participation were created and awarded to the Cromarty Youth Cafe children and young people who have been core co-producers since 2014. Badges printed for everyone involved, saying - 'I'm a co-creater with Representing Cromarty'. Badge also says - 'How Cromarty Cares', publicising the exhibition and related events.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Medical Humanities and New Approaches to  Social Healthcare in Scotland: Empowering People 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Talk enabled comparison with another city in European context
Talk sparked questions and discussion around our major themes such as resilience

I made several valuable contacts at this university in Brno, Czech Republic, and these links may be helpful in the future
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Memories Are Made Of This: Fourways Club Singalong & Memory Jar Session 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact Event attended by 19 elders, to discuss songs which are popular locally. Participants also posted thoughts about what makes Fourways Club special, into Memory Jars. Useful discussion about boundaries between songs and practices which are private to the group and those which it is alright to video and report upon, so that members can control and protect their own media presence, or non presence.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Merthyr Express article 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact A journalist wrote an article based on information I provided about Merthyr Moves

We had a double page spread on the event in the local press.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Merthyr Moves: a multi-media arts installation 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Multi-media event brought different groups together and showcased the work of participants, sparking debate over the representation of the community and local issues

During the event we spoke to the regional Assembly Member and Minister for education who wanted to know more about the research. Teachers asked me to get in touch with them with any future opportunities to engage with the research. The local press published an article on the event the following week. Audience feedback indicated they had broadened their understanding of others' experiences of living in this community.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Message in a Bottle 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Intergenerational activity with Cromarty Youth Cafe and The Fourways Club, writing letters and drawing pictures, about local life. These were sent, as Messages in Bottles, to participants in the other 4 case study communities.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description My Cromarty Dream & Cromarty Dreaming Post Boxes 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact My Cromarty Dream - Cromarty Youth Café activity, collaging dreams.
Cromarty Dreaming Post Box & display in The Library - June - August - Post Box & Wall display, for making & posting dreams.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Narrative, Community Health, and Medical Humanities 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact We presented the project to a group of scholars and medical practitioners interested in Medical Humanities and this sparked discussion

Not sure as yet
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Narrative, Community Wellbeing, and Medical Humanities 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Northern Network for Medical Humanities Research, Wellcome Trust funded invited Dr McKechnie-Mason to take part in their event at Liverpool University. The talk sparked questions and discussion afterwards and developed thinking on the project in Medical Humanities context.

Developed thinking on the project in new contexts and from multi-disciplinary perspectives
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://nnmh.org.uk/
 
Description Our Wellbeing Words 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact A series of workshops conducted with children and young people attending Cromarty Yoth Cafe:
Session 1 - Words for Feelings;
Session 2 - Doing Words;
Session 3 - Our Wellbeing Cartoons
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Performance-based debate: The People's Platform 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The People's Platform was a piece of theatre based on research data from our North Merthyr case study. Using a mixture of professional and new actors, and working with National Theatre Wales and POSSIB, the show was performed to an audience of over 200 members of the community. The audience were sat around tables and discussed issues highlighted by the performances. There were a number of impacts including a newspaper article and film.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fH2JwZRdMnU
 
Description Practitioner engagement event: Using arts and creativity as evidence, findings from Representing Dennistoun 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Twenty-two practitioners from academia, public sector and third sector arts organsiations attended a workshop to explore the role of arts and creativity as forms of evidence to tackle inequality, inform health related policy and promote social action. The subsequent conversation raised helpful issues for us to consider:
• Can these methods be developed as part of an evaluation tool kit?
• Would be very powerful if juxtaposed with other forms of data- eg statistics
• Not to conflate qualitative research and artistic processes. Let the art speak for itself.
• Draw out local area for improvement
• Arts power is in changing attitudes and physical change follows. Pay attention to how attitudes are being shaped.
• Makes the invisible visible.
• How did the process affect the researchers? Did it change our attitudes particularly around connectivity, community and risk?
• Too take care how we 'present' the research as this in itself will shape identity.
• In future, think about how we can use this with policy makers form the start. What are policy-makers stories?
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Presentation to Cromarty Community Council 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact A presentation to Cromarty and District Community Council, as a means to describe the project and begin developing local relationships which would generate a range of co-productive partnerships. This was successful and we update the Community Council, on activities, periodically.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.cromartylive.co.uk/commmunitycouncil.asp
 
Description Presentation to Merthyr Tydfil Local Authority 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact We were invited to present findings from our research to a group of senior service leads in Merthyr Tydfil Local Authority in advance of their preparations for implementing the Wellbeing of Future Generations Act (Wales) 2015 locally. This informed the wellbeing audit the group was preparing as part of their legal requirements for the Act.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Project Advisory and Reference Group (PARG) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact The PARG is a yearly meeting for the research staff of the project to showcase there work and introduce some of the community partners to the Project Advisory Group, the first event was held in Birmingham, November 2013, the second in Cardiff November 14 and there will be a third in Cromarty in 2015.

It provides an opportunity for the case studies to meet face to face and share links across the case studies and also gain support and advice from the advisory members which has proven very useful in terms of reaching Policy Makers.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Reminiscence-based luncheons (Grangetown/Butetown) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact The Reminiscence-based luncheons were attended by members of the ACES luncheon club looking at memories, wellbeing, resilience and agency.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL https://ajourneysofar.wordpress.com/
 
Description Reporting from Cromarty: Creative Works in Video led by Digital Artist, Gavin Lockhart 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact 18 children and young people took part in this Easter Holiday activity. This built on previous video skills work the year before and in intervening winter sessions but provided outdoor activities aimed at talking about wellbeing in Cromarty.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Reporting from Cromarty: Scones and Stories 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Intergenerational workshops (4), teaching Youth Cafe young people to use video for oral history work, and to help the community elders fill in Informed Consent Forms. Development of skills to create their own digital stories.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015,2016
 
Description Representations of Butetown through the Lens: Approaches, Photographs, (Re) imaginings 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Representations of Butetown: The Lens
Date: 26 June 2015
Venue: Corys Building, Bute Street
The Lens brought together photographers/artists from Butetown and further afield, who have made this community a focus in their work. The aim is to bring together those living and/or working in Butetown, as well as those in the history, heritage and arts sectors, to re-ignite conversation on the many ways in which Butetown has, and is being represented.

"Representation is always already inadequate to the real that it seeks to inscribe" (Rosalind Morris, 2010)

Representation is a tricky thing. Spivak uses the represent (vertreten) verses re-present (darstellen) to engage with notions of theory and the intellectual and how they engage with those who act and struggle (subaltern). Spivak states that an attempt "to confront them is not to represent them, but to learn to re-present ourselves."

I would argue that re-presentation is the property of all, but as researchers or artists we may not always have the specific means, be they specifically cultural, social or otherwise, to interpret the different prospective ways in which people re-present themselves. According to Spivak representation is seen as "speaking for (as in politics) and re-presentation as in art or philosophy". In short, for research, representation is (as Morris says) already inadequate to the real and according to Spivak re-presentation potentially allows us to show something of ourselves (often through our silence, the gaps and what we do not/cannot say).

We hosted an event called 'Representing Butetown: The Lens'. Five interviews were conducted with different photographers in Cardiff (various locations) and Newport. The interviews were edited into a short video piece and the photographers were invited to exhibit and talk about some of their work with members of the Butetown community.

I'd like to talk a little about how I developed the video. The point of doing the interviews in the first place was to get an idea (as an outsider) about ways of engaging. The work of capturing the interviews became an artistic opportunity in itself when I made the decision to work with a handheld camera to explore visual aesthetics, ways of seeing and by extension, ways of viewing, by deliberately playing with extreme close-ups, for example. As a result, two things were crucial to the video: 1) what they were saying and 2) how they were seen.

Why was the visual aesthetic and deliberate manipulation important or even relevant to the aim of the project event?

One of the key themes about representation that seemed to be cropping up in our brief analysis of the footage was the notion of wanting to create 'honest' portraits, spontaneous, not posed. There seemed to be a desire to capture the glimpse of a reality - how we are, how we were? Stuart Hall says in his concession to realism that the images in Picture Post were documentary not art. As with the Picture Post and their Wartime Britain images, the images sought to capture the facts of this-is-what-happened and also to evoke the experience of having been there.

In many ways, I was interested in playing with the 'art of documentary' or rather, pushing the boundaries of the documentary video to make apparent (through an art process), the facts of the experience. To expose, not just the orations but the reality that these individuals were talking and responding to me and that I in turn, was observing and listening to them. The visual play was also an attempt to encourage the viewer to have that sense of the intimate that I experienced.

At this point I will add that this justification for the product that emerged does not dismiss the possibility that the visual choices for some, may have had the opposite effect than those intended (that is, distraction and unease) or that had I only depended on my 2nd camera placed uncompromisingly on a tripod, that the interviewer presence would have been obliterated. Again, I place emphasis on the word 'play' in art and experimentation and ways of pushing conceptual ideas into practice.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MC5QX_MmZq4
 
Description Representing Communities: Developing the creative power of people to improve health and wellbeing 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact To present and introduce the Representing Communities Project to an audience

Created and interest and discussion
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.rgs.org/NR/rdonlyres/26CC0F19-23E0-43A3-B68D-9B74D5D5E368/0/AC2014_ProgBook_FINAL_Lowres....
 
Description Representing Hodgehill: Dissemination of findings of workpackge 1 and 2 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Participants in your research and patient groups
Results and Impact We presented the findings of work package 1 and 2 and we discussed the use of culturally appropriate creative arts activities.

After this presentation, one of the attendees from Birmingham City Council has asked us to run a workshop at their seminar listed below:
SEMINAR - Library of Birmingham Event: FRIDAY 13TH MARCH 2015

Working Title: Art builds bridges
How can culture co-design contribute to building and integrating communities?
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Scottish Health Council Knowledge Exchange Event 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact MacPhail gave a presentation about participatory methods being used in the Representing Communities project, at The Scottish Health Council Research and Public Involvement Knowledge Exchange event in Perth Concert Hall, 12th March 2015. Attendance was c 80 people. The day event also involved table based discussion and debate.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.scottishhealthcouncil.org/home.aspx
 
Description Scottish Parliamentary Reception 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact As part of a UHI Health Research Showcase at the Scottish Parliament, research outputs were displayed, discussed and distributed to MSPs and invited guests. This raised awareness of the project's findings and potential for future research, particularly in Inverness hospitals (greenspace) and rural areas (participatory work with communities).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Sewing buttons to complete the Tapestry Project and showcase the work 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an open day or visit at my research institution
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Undergraduate students
Results and Impact We held an event at the university where women from the Pakistani community who had produced the tapestry and taken part in the research and women from the Birmingham Branch of the Embroiders Guild took part in an showcasing/engagement event. The women sat in a room and worked on the tapestry and students and staff were invited to drop in to the sessions and have a discussion as well as sew a button on to the tapestry.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description The Butetown Carnival Remembered - film production and launch 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact In April 2015, the project funded 15th Floor productions to develop and lead a small project to platform the carnival as a way in which to explore what matters to people in Butetown, and what Butetown means to them, with a focus on understandings and manifestations of wellbeing and resilience ('let's get together and feel alright' - A key theme of the 2014 Carnival). The final product was a film that was launched (alongside a pop-up photography exhibition) in the local arts centre and attracting 80 people. In promoting the film, Simon Campbell stated

Carnival celebrations will kick off early in the Bay when a week of special events starts on Monday, 24th August, with the screening of a new film, Butetown Carnival Memories. The film features video footage and photography from Butetown carnivals spanning five decades, some of which has never before been seen in public. The screening will take place in the heart of the community at the HUB cinema at CCHA @ LOUDOUN, Bute Street, Cardiff, CF10 5HW, from 6.30pm to 8.30pm and some light refreshments will be provided. Immediately after this event a photographic exhibition, Carnival Memories, will be unveiled at Butetown Community Centre, 40 Loudoun Square, Cardiff, CF10 5UZ. Sounds, food and drink will be available and both events are free. I would like to thank the people who have helped these two events come to fruition: Roiyah Saltus for her ongoing support through the University of South Wales and their Representing Butetown project, who funded the making of the video; Nasir Adam,\ from CCHA @ Loudoun, for supporting us and allowing us to use the venue for the film's first screening; Carole Fox and the rest of the Butetown Community Centre staff for their help and support; Keith Murrell for digitising the carnival tapes and Anthony Campbell for editing the film; The Black Film and Video Workshop in Wales whose foresight and hard work resulted in much of the Carnival being filmed and photographed in the 1980s
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BVENtPtK8iQ
 
Description The Cruise of The Betsey Project 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The broader work by RSGS, which draws on recordings and new work from the voyage and community based events, is aimed at creating new schools materials and new methods for earth sciences in Scottish secondary schools. The work is now developing beyond this first phase. Initial outputs include film, a ceilidh, schools involvement across Scotland.

My written piece for this project and my participation resulted in new understandings of rural health via the life of Hugh Miller and new conceptualisations of the ways in which different, allegedly remote, communities, were and are connected, past and present.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://cruiseofthebetsey.wordpress.com/about/
 
Description Townlands Project & Cromarty Cares 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This voluntary group seeks to provide imaginative forms of collective housing, for elderly people, and others with a need for some form of supported living. Since starting our project the group has diversified into their Cromarty Cares activities, which has involved creating a locally managed pool of high quality home carers to serve local needs. Issie has had on-going involvement with the group, throughout the project. This group includes 2 GPs, arts sector people and a retired NHS staff member. They are all very active in contributing to new ways of describing and exploring local wellbeing issues, as co-producers on this project.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015,2016
 
Description UHI Centre for History Carnegie Centenary Professorship Conference: Land and People 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact Skills transfer and capacity building in how to create and run an academically rigorous conference which also succeeds in being engaged with and co-produced by local community groups actively engaged in the conference topics. This was achieved by mentoring the key conference organiser; facilitating community contacts; showing how to embed arts, music, social enterprises and local history groups/ museums into the core programme and advising on technical and production issues and providing skilled contacts to deliver on these elements as part of the team.

My intellectual contribution, via my introductory speech for Professor Richards keynote session, focused on the pivotal importance and potential of being part of an academic community at for rural dwellers at a local, regional and global levels. My key phrase fro this was 'the importance of kindly intellectual provocation'.

The papers presented at the conference were also of relevance to the Representing Cromarty case study.

A very successful event was delivered - it generated extremely good feedback, including high praise for the arts and community aspects being so fully embedded within the event and the fact that gave a different feel and intellectual experience compared to standard academic formats. The key organiser and helpers feel equipped to 'go it alone' next time. 17 secondary school pupils attended the keynote speech alongside 92 academic delegates. Others speakers, including the keynote, drew upon and expanded upon the idea of 'kindly intellectual provocation' in exploring the more contentious aspects of the programme which challenge prevailing explanatory tropes of Highland history. My talk will be available on-line as apart of the video shorts of the keynote speeches.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description VIDEO VIEWBOX - BUTETOWN CARNIVAL REMEMBERED 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The VIDEO VIEWBOX - BUTETOWN CARNIVAL REMEMBERED is an interactive pop-up installation created for the 2014 Butetown Carnival by Simon and Anthony Campbell, in association with Representing 'Butetown': The Caribbean Elders Project (Roiyah Saltus, University of South Wales). The aim is create a space for carnival goers to reflect and share their thoughts on what the Butetown Carnival means to them. Voice is a vital element of the installation and our aim is to foster a space where people can share stories, recollections and memories of importance to them. These voices represent individual and collective understandings of the role and significance of the Butetown Carnival that we feel are meaningful and of value.

Of the many visitors, 16 interviews were captured and 10 postcards containing the memories of carnival goers were completed. The interviews will be transcribed and analysed with the aim being to explore notions of belonging, wellbeing and community. The interviews will also be included in a forthcoming social documentary on the Butetown Carnival being produced by a small community film organisation.

This is engagement in progress.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://representingcommunities.co.uk/butetown/
 
Description We Are Cromarty - arts event 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Interactions at every part of the events programme generated discussion about our health and wellbeing deep mapping project and generated new participants for deep mapping recorded journeys and other aspects of the project work. We video recorded the key events and this serves as fieldwork data. We provided tech support for video projections in 3 rooms and video of key events as a contribution to this event programme.

National level participants and local and regional attendees achieved an understanding or our work and our aims and committed to being involved in those, going forward over the next 2 years. Ways of working which lay the groundwork for effective co-production were established.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.thefriendsofhughmiller.org.uk/news.asp?intent=viewstory&newsid=60864
 
Description Workshop entitled "Understanding and building resilient communities", at the National Intelligence Event, 'Planning together to improve local well-being: What works?', 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact The workshop was to stimulate an understanding of resilient communities in the context of the Wellbeing of Future Generation Wales (2015) Act. In particular the workshop engaged officers working in the Public Service Boards (PSBs) who are required to implement the Act locally. The importance of connections, knowledge and voice were stressed and the value of arts based approaches to both understand the ways in which resilience plays out in everyday 'soft systems' and as a mechanism to engage publics in knowledge exchange, was shared.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.dataunitwales.gov.uk/national-intelligence-event-2017