Transforming Musicology

Lead Research Organisation: Goldsmiths College
Department Name: Computing Department

Abstract

This project, led by Prof Tim Crawford in the Computing Department of Goldsmiths College, University of London, brings together 15 researchers to effect a Digital Transformation of the discipline of musicology. It is an opportunity to transform the discipline's impact and status by recognising the full implications of its multidisciplinary nature and taking advantage of the potentials of technology for studying the vast musical resources of the internet.
The world of music has been already transformed by the digital revolution. The same technology that has given unprecedented access to music for a vast and ever-growing international audience can open musicology up to the world - anyone and everyone can contribute by a variety of means enabled by that technology. We will show how the computational tools of music information retrieval (MIR) can be enhanced and adapted to the needs of musicologists, and how state-of-the-art developments in the Semantic Web can be exploited both to make their work more relevant and more sustainable, so that their methods can be easily re-used on new data.
This project will stimulate creativity through multidisciplinary collaborative working. In the past, musicologists have tended to be lone scholars; regular collaboration in a multidisciplinary research environment will in future be essential for them to find what is "interesting" in potentially huge collections of music.
We shall be using MIR tools in three main strands of research. Two of these are typical subjects for musicology and will be conducted by world-leading experts: 16th-century music and Wagnerian leitmotives. These will use state-of-the-art score- and audio-analysis techniques to extend the range of musicological investigation beyond the normal limitation to printed scores. We'll also be doing psychological work at Goldsmiths to study why leitmotives are so recognisable (or not). Our third main research strand is entirely novel, being nothing less than a prototype for a new 'musicology of the social media'. Music is now created, recorded, distributed, re-used and shared entirely online throughout the world and we will explore a whole new way of studying it and the online spread of musical ideas.
We'll also get a group of musicologists to work for six months on their own research ideas alongside technologists who'll help to realise them. The fruits of this work will be presented at a public workshop and published online and in book form. These mini-projects will be launched at a networking/sandpit meeting which will be recorded and presented online. The website and blog will be used for dynamic and ongoing engagement between the researchers, the research community, and the music industry.
Through this project technologists in the music industry will see that musicology helps them answer the needs of their clients by offering better means of access to the music they want to hear. The digital revolution in music delivery and re-use raises many crucial issues to do with creativity, authorship, marketing, copyright and commercial value beyond those normally associated with musicology. Combining the analytical methods of musicology and the power of digital methods brings intellectual rigour and empirical validity to these debates. Musicologists need this cross-disciplinary background to contribute most effectively and to create new and valuable roles within the music industry.
Musicology should not be an 'ivory-tower' discipline; most people are interested in where music comes from, how it is conceived and made, how it affects us and society. Music goes on in people's minds, and the study of music is essentially about interactions between people. Because of this, music raises a complex mixture of philosophical, psychological and intellectual challenges; so it is a particularly fruitful domain for working through technical challenges which will be more widely applicable to the Digital Humanities and beyond.

Planned Impact

This is an opportunity to transform the impact and status of musicology within the UK by recognising the full implications of its multidisciplinary nature and taking advantage of the potentials of technology for studying the vast musical resources of the internet. The world of music has been transformed by the digital revolution. The same technology that has given unprecedented access to music for a vast and ever-growing international audience could open musicology up to the world - anyone and everyone can contribute by a variety of means enabled by that technology.
The discipline of musicology now needs to catch up. This project will be a primary catalyst for that step change, transforming musicology and stimulating creativity through multidisciplinary collaborative working. Regular collaboration in a multidisciplinary research environment is an essential component in helping musicologists to find what is "interesting" in potentially huge collections of music
We will engage musicologists to work for six months on their own novel research ideas with technologists helping to realise them. The fruits of this work will be presented at a public workshop and published online and in book form. We regard this as a vital component of the project's impact, ensuring sustainability of the outcomes and as a major way of engagement with issues such as IP and rights-protected data. These mini-projects will be launched at a networking/sandpit meeting which will be recorded and presented online. The website and blog will be used for dynamic and ongoing engagement between the researchers, the research community, and non-academic stakeholders such as the music industry.
Computational techniques can take their place alongside conventional methods of musicology. They will transform the discipline so that it can begin to use contemporary and future online music resources for investigation, which it cannot do at present. To achieve this, at first musicologists must collaborate routinely with technologists to use their methods, but eventually these will become part of standard training.
Through this project technologists working in the music industry will come to realise that incorporating musicology helps them to answer the needs of their clients by offering better means of access to the music they want to hear. There is real potential here for genuine Knowledge Transfer.
The digital revolution in music delivery and re-use raises many crucial issues to do with creativity, authorship, marketing, copyright and commercial value beyond those normally associated with musicology. The combination of the analytical methods of musicology and the power of digital methods brings intellectual rigour and empirical validity to these debates. Musicologists need this cross-disciplinary background to contribute most effectively and to create new and valuable roles within the music industry.
Musicology need not - and should not - be an 'ivory-tower' discipline; most people are interested in where some kind of music comes from, how it is conceived and made, how it affects us and society. Music goes on in people's heads, and the study of music is essentially about interactions between people. Because of this, music raises a complex mixture of philosophical, psychological and intellectual challenges; so it is a particularly fruitful domain for working through technical challenges which will be more widely applicable to the Digital Humanities and beyond.
By including three PhD students, who will benefit from joint supervision by musicologists and technologists, as well as 4/5 mini-projects bringing researchers from different domains together, this project is - as far as we are aware - unprecedented in its aspiration to pass on cross-disciplinary lessons to the next generation. This will result over time in a transformation of the musicological researcher into a multi-skilled professional with a wide range of employment possibilities outside academia.
 
Description Despite the possibly slightly misleading title of the project, which could be taken to imply that we - the project - intended to 'transform' musicology, we have been very pleased to observe a generally positive reception from our peers in the discipline. The main aim was to explore some of the various ways in which musicology could catch up with the transformation in music distribution and practice that has resulted from the 'digital revolution' of that past three decades. We have carried out this exploration principally in three research 'strands': early printed vocal and instrumental music; Wagner's use of leitmotivs; musicology of social media.

In the first of these strands, we have applied techniques of music and text information retrieval (using algorithms developed by us and former colleagues in related projects) to investigate how instrumental arrangements in the 16th century were done and disseminated. We tracked the use of certain ornamental clichés in lute arrangements of both sacred and secular music, and were able to show that they were treated slightly differently. We also carried out preliminary research into 'playability' of music (such as that for the lute) which is notated in tablature, as this is specific to a particular instrument, yet has not been very much investigated in traditional musicology. This has led to a successful Follow-On Funding bid for "Learn To Play: Computational Assessment of Musical Playability for Users' Practice" in which we have teamed up with an industrial partner (Tido Music, a subsidiary of Peters Edition) to produce a proof-of-concept demonstrator for a program which will automatically 'grade' a collection of music, will indicate the most difficult passage within a selected piece, and on request will generate a set of practice exercises based on a selection within a piece.
The work on Wagner's compositional methods, especially his use of leitmotivs, has led to a substantial chapter, which will appear in our forthcoming multimedia project publication, by Prof Laurence Dreyfus, provisionally entitled: 'Asking the forbidden question: Lohengrin's thematic network and Wagner's paradigmatic project'. This combines written text, music score examples and audio recorded examples in an entirely novel way enabled by the semantic infrastructural work we have done within the project. Prof Dreyfus's DPhil student at Oxford, Carolin Rindfleisch, has developed an innovative resource for the historical study of the leitmotiv concept over the period from Wagner's own writings to the present, including a comprehensive ontology for the annotation of documents such as leitmotiv guides.
The third strand, Musicology of Social Media, has involved research into contemporary popular music as discussed on the 'Genius' web-site by large numbers of enthusiastic online contributors. The main findings concern the ways in which contributors 'cluster' around particular artists and genres. The establishment and recognition of genre as a musical feature and the limitations of the 'standard', commercially-driven interpretations of the concept are addressed in the PhD work of our second project student, Justin Gagen, at Goldsmiths.

Further work, at Queen Mary University, has involved the redeployment and further development of The Harmonic Visualiser, a software program which can extract musical features for individual voices/instruments from an audio track in order to allow their manipulation or analysis. The QM team also worked on a novel method for extracting so-called 'chroma' features which can be used for audio-based music information retrieval. A PhD student at QM, Nicholas Harley, is working on a theoretical model for the mid-level representation of music so as to allow semantic interoperability between scores and audio recordings; this has been implemented as software and presented at several conferences.

A series of four mini-projects funded from the main grant have been managed by Dr Alan Marsden at Lancaster University. These have carried out ground-breaking work on: historical and contemporary electronic music (Dr Nick Collins, Durham); folk music of Ireland (Dr Münevver Köküer, Birmingham City University); Medieval Latin lyrics for the sacred song-form known as conductus; historical concert programmes and other musical ephemera (Prof Rachel Cowgill, Huddersfield University).

Binding all these activities together, and enabling otherwise impossible or unwieldy interactions between them, is the semantic infrastructure developed by the T-Mus team at the Oxford eResearch Centre. This has developed useful sets of ontologies, and specialised software, for the provision, maintenance and exploitation of Linked Data within musicology; not only musical data itself, but also the workflows of research in the field and the verbal discourse around the discipline. This entirely novel application of technologies pioneered within the sciences is of great potential in the pursuit of humanities research in general, since the resources explored by musicologists cover almost every conceivable data type and format.
Exploitation Route There are probably too many ways to encapsulate here, but the principal ones are probably around future research in related areas, such as musicology (historical and analytical) or music information retrieval. We have produced Open Source software which can be freely used by others (and is being so used), and some of the research has already led to further funded research.
Sectors Creative Economy,Digital/Communication/Information Technologies (including Software),Education,Electronics,Leisure Activities, including Sports, Recreation and Tourism,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections,Retail,Other
URL http://www.transforming-musicology.org
 
Description • At an early stage (6-month report to Advisory Panel) our web-site had 9,000 unique visitors; over 50 per day. At the same time our blog had received 1,500 unique visitors. Our Twitter account (116 members at that time) has also been very active. By the time of our 12-month report to our Advisory Panel, the website visits had risen to 32,000 unique visitors - an increase of 350%. • We have published Linked Data on people and places in ECOLM and EMO which have direct utility for the music-library community (non-academic). • We have involved members of the London Wagner Society (non-academic) in psychological testing of people's ability to recognise Wagnerian leitmotives; they came out very well ahead of all other musicians and non-musicians, demonstrating that familiarity with the music is the most important predictor of success in this task • In November 2014 we participated in the Festival of the Humanities, 'Being Human', with a series of experiments to capture audience responses to Wagner's 'Ring' Cycle of four operas (15 hours of music) and a public event at the Birmingham Hippodrome. This received media attention, including a spot on Radio 4's Today programme. (We were given extra funding to carry out this work, which was not part of our original project proposal, but arose directly out of our research). The experiment involved 10 music students from the Birmingham Conservatoire, and has been replicated in a further experiment with Goldsmiths students watching a DVD of Pierre Boulez's famous Bayreuth performances from the 1970s. • On 13-14 December 2014 RA Ben Fields was involved with organising the Music Hack Days in London; this involves mostly non-academic developers of music software, most of whom work within the music industry. • We have developed a generic semantic data alignment tool (SALT) which will enable non-academic library cataloguers, broadcasters and other media curators to take advantage of the latest technology in their work. This was demonstrated to the BBC Research & Development team on 15 October 2015, and aroused a good deal of interest. • On 9 October 2015 we organised a small 'Hackathon' at Goldsmiths with additional funding from the parallel SLoBR project (OeRC, PI: Kevin Page); this was attended mostly by non-academic music developers.
First Year Of Impact 2013
Sector Creative Economy,Digital/Communication/Information Technologies (including Software),Education,Leisure Activities, including Sports, Recreation and Tourism,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections
Impact Types Cultural,Societal,Economic
 
Description Dagstuhl workshop 'Reproducibility of Data-Oriented Experiments in e-Science
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Membership of a guideline committee
 
Description AHRC Digital Transformations Fellow
Amount £6,000 (GBP)
Organisation Arts & Humanities Research Council (AHRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK)
Start 09/2015 
 
Description AHRC Follow-On Funding for Impact and Engagement
Amount £199,099 (GBP)
Funding ID AH/P013287/1 
Organisation Arts & Humanities Research Council (AHRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK)
Start 02/2017 
End 08/2018
 
Description Being Human Festival
Amount £3,000 (GBP)
Organisation Arts & Humanities Research Council (AHRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK)
Start 08/2015 
 
Title Transforming Musicology Workflows 
Description In Transforming Musicology, we enrich instance level data connections (see Section 2) with the semantics of workflows. The methodologies of each con- stitutent project were recorded and systematically assessed for opportunities of support and reuse. Workflows were divided into four consecutive, tripartite steps: data preparation, data capture, summarizing, and visualization. Each has input data, a process, and resulting output. Metadata semantics capture the relation- ships, provenance, and other aspects of each part of the workflow, including dependencies and causation (e.g. prov:wasDerivedFrom from Prov-O[19]). There are eight areas of study. The core (AS1 - 3) are under development by the Universities of Oxford and London, Goldsmith's College - these are sup- plemented by investigations currently underway at other institutions (AS4 - 7): AS1: 16th century lute and vocal music, which combines tablature with audio[6]; AS2a: Analysis of leitmotivs within the compositions of Richard Wagner[18]; AS2b: The psychological effects these leitmotivs can have on the listener[14]; AS3: Social media of Musicology, concentrating on Genius2 and Echonest3; and AS4: Medieval Music, Big Data and the Research Blend (Southampton)[5]; AS5: Characterising stylistic interpretations through automated detection of or- namentation in Irish traditional music recordings (Birmingham; Birmingham City; and the Dundalk Institute of Technology)[10]; the other multi-institutional AS6:In Concert: Towards a Collaborative Digital Archive of Musical Ephemera (Cardiff; Birmingham; British Library; Goldsmiths College; and Illinois)[7]; and AS7:Large-scale corpus analysis of historical electronic music using MIR tools: Informing an ontology of electronic music and cross-validating content-based methods (Durham). 
Type Of Material Model of mechanisms or symptoms - human 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact • A conference paper is being submitted 
 
Title Slickmem Triple Store 
Description Published Linked Data on people and places in ECOLM and EMO (actually extending work from SLICKMEM mini-project). In the case of ECOLM 150 out of 198 (76%), and for EMO 661 out of 1,037 (64%) personal names mentioned in the metadata could be certainly aligned with VIAF and MusicBrainz, mostly automatically, but with the help of a specially-designed interface for manual intervention in ambiguous cases. Place names were more successful (in this case with VIAF and DBPedia): 100% of country-names and 87% of settlements were aligned automatically. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact It has been used as the basis for a demonstrator for linking British Library catalogue data with BBC Radio 3 broadcast data, which was shown to BBC Research & Development in October 2015 and attracted a great deal of interest. 
URL http://slickmem.data.t-mus.org
 
Description Delius Workshop 
Organisation The Royal Danish Library
Country Denmark, Kingdom of 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution OeRC hosted a two day workshop in conjunction with the Oxford Delius project with Axel Geertinger and Sigfrid Lundberg from the Danish Centre for Music Editing, at The Royal Library in Copenhagen. May 2016.
Collaborator Contribution Axel Geertinger and Sigfrid Lundberg from the Danish Centre for Music Editing, at The Royal Library in Copenhagen, presented and assisted with preparation for the workshop
Impact Multi-disciplinary
Start Year 2016
 
Description Dr. Xiao Hu 
Organisation University of Hong Kong
Country Hong Kong, Special Administrative Region of China 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We hosted Dr. Xiao Hu from the University of Hong Kong for a research visit to Oxford. Dr Hu is active in the Music Information Retrieval community, particularly user-centered evaluation. April 2016.
Collaborator Contribution Dr Hu visited and carried out research with us.
Impact N/A
Start Year 2016
 
Description Oxford Illinois Digital Libraries Placement Programme 
Organisation University of Illinois
Department University of Illinois (Urbana-Champaign)
Country United States of America 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Oxford Illinois Digital Libraries Placement Programme. We hosted a student studying for their Masters in Library and Information Science at the University of Illinois, who worked with us on our SALT software in June-August 2016.
Collaborator Contribution Useful collaboration on some essential software for our project
Impact Semantic alignment and linking tool supporting the bridging and combined access of diverse sets of linked data
Start Year 2016
 
Title AudioDB Test Framework 
Description The AudioDB system allows content-based search in audio databases. This software allows large scale researches to be automated and the results to be evaluated using standard information retrieval methods. 
Type Of Technology Software 
Year Produced 2015 
Open Source License? Yes  
Impact None. 
URL https://github.com/TransformingMusicology/adb-test-framework
 
Title Customisations to MEI to support lute tablature 
Description The customisations provide two new modules for the Music Encoding Initiative schema: an instruments module provides new elements which describe details of how instruments can be set up and some playing techniques; lutetab provides elements for encoding lute tablature notation. 
Type Of Technology Software 
Year Produced 2014 
Impact None. 
URL https://github.com/TransformingMusicology/mei-tmus
 
Title Harmonic Visualiser 
Description This software application analyses audio signals into component sinusoidal tracks (aka partials). It is capable of inferring where missing partials should be in the spectrum and annotating them in the representation. Additionally it is capable of measuring certain features in the collection of partials, such as vibrato. From there it can parameterise these and perform complex signal processing on them, such as removing the vibrato in a note or pasting in a different vibrato pattern. It has been developed over several years under a variety of funding. 
Type Of Technology Webtool/Application 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact This has been used is several projects local to Queen Mary and within Goldsmiths. It is not yet released for general usage, but is planned to be for late 2017. 
 
Title MELD framework for dynamic semantic musical notation, supporting distributed annotation of musical score in a performance setting 
Description A framework for dynamic semantic musical notation, supporting distributed annotation of musical score in a performance setting 
Type Of Technology Software 
Year Produced 2016 
Open Source License? Yes  
Impact Used in various contexts as a tool for development of web-sites within the Transforming Musicology and FAST (EPSRC) projects 
URL https://github.com/oerc-music/meld
 
Title MuSAK Analysis System 
Description The Musical Score Annotation Kit allows real-time annotations to be made on musical scores. The system provides methods of classifying the annotation shapes for publication and further analysis. 
Type Of Technology Software 
Year Produced 2016 
Open Source License? Yes  
Impact None. 
URL https://github.com/ironchicken/musak-annotations
 
Title Musical Score Annotation Kit 
Description MetaMuSAK supports a system designed for making real-time annotations on a musical score by allowing the data produced by the system to be published as RDF and to be analysed. 
Type Of Technology Software 
Year Produced 2015 
Open Source License? Yes  
Impact The system was re-deployed in a musical performance of Emily Howard's "Ada Sketches" as part of the national celebration of the work of Ada Lovelace. 
URL http://www.transforming-musicology.org/tools/metaMuSAK/
 
Title SALT Semantic alignment and linking tool supporting the bridging and combined access of diverse sets of linked data. 
Description It is a semantic alignment and linking tool supporting the bridging and combined access of diverse sets of linked data. A graphical interface allows a user to validate and modify links between resources suggested automatically by the software; this greatly increases productivity in various multimedia applications. 
Type Of Technology Software 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact Use on several related projects, including Transforming Musicology and FAST (EPSRC). Demonstrated to a very interested audience of BBC researchers and developers in November 2015 (though unfortunately these BBC activities have been much curtailed since then). Further used in the SLoBR software, developed in a small project with the BBC to demonstrate linkage possibilities between different media types. 
URL https://github.com/oerc-music/salt
 
Title SLoBR software to facilitate the creation of unified views over combined datasets 
Description The SLoBR software tool facilitates the creation of unified views over combined datasets linked using the SALT tool. 
Type Of Technology Software 
Year Produced 2016 
Open Source License? Yes  
Impact Developed with BBC collaboration in a short project closely related to Transforming Musicology and involving several team members (Kevin Page, David Lewis, Ben Fields, Tim Crawford). 
URL https://github.com/oerc-music/slobr-ui
 
Title The Numbers into Notes web application 
Description "Supposing, for instance, that the fundamental relations of pitched sounds in the science of harmony and of musical composition were susceptible of such expression and adaptations, the engine might compose elaborate and scientific pieces of music of any degree of complexity or extent." Ada Lovelace, 1843 This tool was developed to generate Fibonacci numbers and reduce them with clock arithmetic, generating a periodic sequence which is then mapped to notes, and the music explored by selecting fragments to play (Lagrange noted periodic functions in Fibonacci numbers in 1774, and the period is known as the Pisano period). Additional algorithms have been added to stimulate discussion of mathematical calculations on the Analytical Engine, contemplating what Ada Lovelace and Charles Babbage might have done if the engine had been built. 
Type Of Technology Webtool/Application 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact It has been used to support a variety of engagement events. Ada Lovelace's significant contributions were celebrated and discussed at the Ada Lovelace Symposium marking the bicentennial of her birth on 10th December 1815 On 30th November 2015 we explored mathematics, computation, and music through a performance of "Ada sketches", a short operatic work by composed by Emily Howard and part of her Lovelace Trilogy. More than a performance, this event with Emily Howard and musicians from the Royal Northern College of Music involved mathematical explanation and engaged the audience in composition, turning numbers into notes. We revisited this work at the Ada Lovelace Symposium through an interactive display and a conversation on stage between David De Roure and Emily Howard, herself a mathematician, computer scientist and musician. This also featured an extract of Howard's work "Mesmerism", another part of the Trilogy, and illustrated numbers and notes by generating a number sequence on a simulator of the Analytical Engine and developing the output as a musical theme-an exercise inspired by discussions at a music hack day held at Goldsmiths in October 2015. 
URL http://www.oerc.ox.ac.uk/news/ada
 
Title genius.com Scraper 
Description PyRG retrieves data from the genius.com site which is then analysed using graph methods in order to find out properties of the networks within the genius.com site. 
Type Of Technology Software 
Year Produced 2014 
Open Source License? Yes  
Impact None. 
URL https://github.com/gearmonkey/pyrg
 
Description 'Hearing Wagner' at the Being Human Festival 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Hearing Wagner attracted 30 registrants; at the closing discussion session the delegates seemed very engaged and asked interesting and challenging questions both about Wagner and about scientific approaches to studying music. Present were the AHRC's Digital Transformations Theme Leader, Prof. Andrew Prescott, and the Director of the Being Human Festival, Prof. Barry Smith (coincidentally Theme Leader of AHRC's Science in Culture). Both declared themselves delighted by the event. Prof. Prescott emailed the T-Mus PI on 27 November as follows:

" my congratulations on what I thought was a very successful event on Saturday. The fact that we had to virtually be forcibly ejected from the room shows how interesting all those who attended found it. I was particularly impressed by the way in which you had developed so quickly tools and procedures (such as the annotated score) which seem to me potentially of interest to other types of research. I was also struck by the way in which the research was raising fascinating research questions around the nature of audience reactions and the wider performativity of data. I reported on the event to the Theme Advisory Group on Tuesday who were also very interested in the day's activities. Once you have all recovered, we should have a discussion about future possibilities for building on this excellent initial piece of public engagement, and also about the potential for further developing links through this work to other AHRC themes."
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description DMRN Dec 2016 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact DMRN aims to promote research in the area of Digital Music, by bringing together researchers from UK universities and industry in electronic engineering, computer science, and music.
"Interacting with robots as performers and producers of music", Alan Chamberlain (University of Nottingham), Kevin R. Page, David De Roure, Graham Klyne and Pip Willcox(University of Oxford)"
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://c4dm.eecs.qmul.ac.uk/dmrn/events/dmrnp11/
 
Description Digital Humanities Congress, Sheffield University Sept 2016, "Early Music & Digital Technology" 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presenters: Tim Crawford, David Lewis
Part of a Transforming Musicology session at the DH Congress.
Disappointing audience, mostly because of clashes with other events
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://www.hrionline.ac.uk/dhc/2016/
 
Description Digital Humanities Congress, Sheffield University Sept 2016, "Hearing Opera: Wagner and the human response" 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presenters: Daniel Müllensiefen, Richard Lewis, Harri Siirtola, David Baker, Christophe Rhodes
Part of a Transforming Musicology session at the DH Congress.
Disappointing audience, mostly because of clashes with other events
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://www.hrionline.ac.uk/dhc/2016/
 
Description Digital Humanities Congress, Sheffield University Sept 2016, "Networks of Musicology" 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presenters: Ben Fields, David Lewis
Part of a Transforming Musicology session at the DH Congress.
Disappointing audience, mostly because of clashes with other events
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://www.hrionline.ac.uk/dhc/2016/
 
Description Digital Humanities Congress, Sheffield University Sept 2016, "Publishing Musicology Digitally" 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presenter: Richard Lewis
Part of a Transforming Musicology session at the DH Congress.
Disappointing audience, mostly because of clashes with other events
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://www.hrionline.ac.uk/dhc/2016/
 
Description Digital Humanities Congress, Sheffield University Sept 2016, "Semantic Linking and the Workflows of Musicology" 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presenters: Kevin Page, Terhi Nermikko-Fuller, Carolin Rindfleisch, David Weigl
Part of a Transforming Musicology session at the DH Congress.
Disappointing audience, mostly because of clashes with other events
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://www.hrionline.ac.uk/dhc/2016/
 
Description Digital Libraries for Musicology workshop, New York, August 2016 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact This workshop, the third such annual event, was - as in the two previous cases - organised and chaired by members of the Transforming Musicology research team, Dr Kevin Page (Oxford, OeRC) and Dr Ben Fields (Goldsmiths, now at FutureLearn). It has been particularly successful in bringing together professional practitioners from the music information retrieval and music library communities (the latter having been a major, but subsequently diminishing, constituency of the first few ISMIR conferences in 2000). The workshop was co-located with the ISMIR conference in New York, and thus attracted a lot of interest from this community of mainly audio engineers.

It is important to recognise that this activity, which we hope will attract continuing support in future, could not have taken place without the Transforming Musicology project.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.transforming-musicology.org/dlfm2016/
 
Description Hacking Sound workshop, Oxford, 20 October 2016 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Hacking Sound workshop. 20 October 2016
Organised by members of the Transforming Musicology research team at Oxford.

Included colleagues from the e-Research Centre, Libraries, and members of the public.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://blogs.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/digital/2016/09/20/an-invitation-to-hack-sound/
 
Description ISMIR 2016 Demos & Posters 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Demonstrations and posters at ISMIR 2016 (August 2016). ISMIR is the premier international conference on music information retrieval. 2016's demonstration session was, for the first time, open to the public, as well as to the academics and industry representatives attending ISMIR. We presented our three poster/demos side-by-side, sparking interesting discussions about the individual demos as well as on the wider FAST project.
"Numbers into Notes: Cast your mind back 200 years", D. de Roure, P. Willcox, and D. M. Weigl
"Dynamic Semantic Notation: Jamming together Music Encoding and Linked Data", D. M. Weigl and K. R. Page
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://wp.nyu.edu/ismir2016/
 
Description Keynote talk by K. Page "A Web of Semantic Annotation: perfectly imperfect?" at the final symposium of the CEDAR project 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Keynote talk by Transforming Musicology team member, Dr Kevin Page (Oxford OeRC), "A Web of Semantic Annotation: perfectly imperfect?" at the final symposium of the CEDAR project (The Use of Linked Data in Research Practices in the Humanities) at the International Institute of Social History in Amsterdam.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://socialhistory.org/en/events/final-cedar-mini-symposium
 
Description Music Encoding Conference, Montreal, May 2016, presentation: "Encoding Music As People Play It: MEI and the role of tablatures in capturing musical performance" 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The presentation: "Encoding Music As People Play It: MEI and the role of tablatures in capturing musical performance" was given by Prof Tim Crawford, David Lewis, and Richard Lewis from the Transforming Musicology research team, with Dr Jessica Schwartz, from UCLA. This collaboration arose directly as a result of Dr Schwartz's participation in the 2015 Oxford Digital Humanities Summer School's workshop on Digital Musicology, itself organised by Transforming Musicology members.

The collaboration has further led to our Follow-On Funding project, Learn To Play, reported elsewhere.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://music-encoding.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/MEC2016_Program.pdf
 
Description Music Encoding Conference, Montreal, May 2016, presentation: "Prototypical Scenarios for Contextual Navigation with MEI and Linked Data" 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The Music Encoding Conference has been a regular venue for Transforming Musicology research presentations, mainly in the realm of early music, but also that of the application of Linked Data technology to musicology.

The present paper drew on a wide range of activities within and outside Transforming Musicology, and was attended by delegates from all over the world.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://music-encoding.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/MEC2016_Program.pdf
 
Description Oxford DH Summer School 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact The highly-prestigious Oxford University Digital Humanities Summer School held a workshop in Digital Musicology for the first time in July 2015. All places were quickly filled, and a bursary provided from the AHRC Digital Transformations Fellow's budget. We used the free place to which participation entitled us to provide a further student bursary.
Members of the Transforming Musicology research team were engaged in this unanticipated outreach/impact activity, organising and presenting lectures to a group of c20 students from all over the world. The project's profile was further raised by our plenary presentations to the entire Summer School during the week.
The Summer School was repeated in July 2016 with a similar level of impact. As before, all places were quickly taken up; in this second year we were able to offer three bursaries.
Contacts with students on these courses (in some cases, themselves established researchers) enabled at least two significant collaborations in follow-up research. Several participants have maintained close contact with us, and we expect future joint projects with them.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015,2016
URL http://dhoxss.humanities.ox.ac.uk/2015/digitalmusicology.html
 
Description Oxford DH Summer School 2016 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact The highly-prestigious Oxford University Digital Humanities Summer School held a workshop in Digital Musicology for the first time in July 2015. All places were quickly filled, and a bursary provided from the AHRC Digital Transformations Fellow's budget. We used the free place to which participation entitled us to provide a further student bursary. Members of the Transforming Musicology research team were engaged in this unanticipated outreach/impact activity, organising and presenting lectures to a group of c20 students from all over the world. The project's profile was further raised by our plenary presentations to the entire Summer School during the week. The Summer School was repeated in July 2016 with a similar level of impact. As before, all places were quickly taken up; in this second year we were able to offer three bursaries. Contacts with students on these courses (in some cases, themselves established researchers) enabled at least two significant collaborations in follow-up research. Several participants have maintained close contact with us, and we expect future joint projects with them.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://digital.humanities.ox.ac.uk/dhoxss/2016
 
Description Presentation at DLfM 2016, "In Collaboration with In Concert: Reflecting a Digital Library as Linked Data for Performance Ephemera" 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This presentation, at a workshop organised by members of Transforming Musicology, was an outcome of a collaboration between the Transforming Musicology research team and one of the mini-projects supported by Transforming Musicology, 'In Concert', which in turn was a collaboration between a data scientist (Alan Dix) and musicologists and music librarians working on historical concert programmes as documentary evidence for music history.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.transforming-musicology.org/dlfm2016/
 
Description Research Uncovered-David De Roure on Ada Lovelace, Numbers, and Notes", 22 Jan 2016 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Talk in the Oxford Centre for Digital Scholarship (Research Uncovered is a series of public talks on digital scholarship; many attendees come from around the University of Oxford but others come from the region, and audiences includes visitors from around the country and the world):

"Research Uncovered-David De Roure on Ada Lovelace, Numbers, and Notes", 22 Jan 2016
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://blogs.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/digital/2016/01/11/research-uncovered-david-de-roure-on-ada-lovelace...