Translation and translanguaging: Investigating linguistic and cultural transformations in superdiverse wards in four UK cities

Lead Research Organisation: University of Birmingham
Department Name: Education

Abstract

The aim of this project is to understand how people communicate multilingually across diverse languages and cultures. We define 'translation' as the negotiation of meaning using different modes (spoken/written/visual/gestural) where speakers have different proficiencies in a range of languages and varieties. When speakers do not share a common language they may rely on translation by professionals, friends or family, or by digital means. Such practices occur in 'translation zones', and are at the cutting edge of translation and negotiation. We view 'cultures' not as fixed sets of practices essential to ethnic groups, but rather as processes which change and which may be negotiable. In our previous research in
multilingual communities we found speakers are not confined to using languages separately, but rather they 'translanguage' as they make meaning. We will look closely and over time at language practices in public and private settings in Birmingham, Cardiff, Leeds, and London. We will investigate how communication occurs (or fails) when people bring different histories and languages into contact. Outcomes will impact on policy on economic growth, migration, health and well-being, sport, cultural heritage, and law, by informing the work of policy-makers and public, private and third sector organisations.

The aims of the research are to:

1. understand translanguaging as communication in public spaces;
2. understand translanguaging as communication in private spaces;
3. understand translanguaging as communication in digital and social spaces;
4. understand local histories of communicative practices;
5. develop transformative, interdisciplinary approaches to researching translanguaging as communication;
6. develop the capacity of researchers to conduct high quality research in the arts and humanities;
7. inform local, national, and international policy in relation to superdiverse community settings.

This study takes an interdisciplinary approach to understand communication in and beyond community settings, focusing on interactions between people engaged in legal advice centres, migrant business, sport, and libraries and museums. These community sites are selected because they are contexts in which multiple languages and varieties are in daily use in superdiverse cities. 'Superdiversity' refers to the interweaving of diversities, in which not only 'ethnicity', but other variables intersect and influence the composition and trajectories of urban centres. Multilingual speakers who have institutional roles and make regular use of digital and online technologies will be selected as key participants (librarians, solicitors, migrant business people, sports coaches). They will provide access to other multilingual speakers, and to communication in private
and digital spaces.

Ethnographic fieldwork will be conducted by researchers in four superdiverse wards in Birmingham, Cardiff, Leeds, and London. Key participants will be 'shadowed' in their workplace by researchers. In each site initial observation will be followed by audio recordings, interviews, and online and digital data collection. Photographing of the linguistic landscape of each ward will continue for 26 months to map the changing cultural and linguistic environment. A succession of published reports and working papers will follow a series of research events including: thematic workshops, network assemblies, city seminars, public engagement showcase events and conferences.

A full and differentiated training programme for practitioners, research assistants, early career and doctoral researchers is put in place for capacity building, which will be a key feature and legacy of the project.

Planned Impact

Who will benefit from this research?
TLANG's design puts in place a strategic network of collaborators whose significant expertise and experience will make visible the benefits and constraints of translanguaging in rapidly-changing, superdiverse settings. Beneficiaries of the research will include individuals, local authorities, businesses, third sector groups and international partners. The project design links people in four city wards with academic and non-academic institutions which share a mission to represent multilingual voices and strengthen local communities. Society will gain from new learning about multilingual communication in British life and its contribution to health, business, social justice and social inclusion.

How will they benefit from this research?
Outcomes of the research, and associated outputs, are:

(1) Enhancing the knowledge economy through documenting how multilingualism can increase economic growth and social well-being.
(1.1) Achieved through Thematic Workshops, Network Assemblies, Conferences and Showcase Events highlighting the role translanguaging plays in families and communities for health, work, heritage and justice.
(1.2) Achieved through a series of user-friendly reports, media and policy briefings widely disseminated to commercial and public organisations, through third sector partnerships and academic networks: e.g. Migrants' Rights Network provides the secretariat for the All-Party Parliamentary Group on Migration
(1.3) Achieved through active web-based presence, including exhibition space for audio and video recordings, maps, photographs, narratives and artefacts; project blog, facebook and Twitter updates; postings of research findings on partners' websites; use of existing websites on multilingualism for dissemination.

(2) Building strategic networks of partnerships across private, public and third sector organisations at city, national and international levels.
(2.1) Achieved through strengthening existing partnerships with city-level institutions across private, public and third sectors in Birmingham, Cardiff, Leeds and London.
(2.2) Achieved through tactical new partnerships with 7 high-profile non-academic partner organisations. The research team will work with them on community engagement and knowledge transfer activities through co-producing media and policy briefings, joint presentations on policy platforms and Network Assemblies, and co-organisation of 4 national Showcase events.
(2.3) Achieved through establishing a Steering Group constituted of non-academic partners, international academics and AHRC colleagues
(2.4) Achieved through accelerating impact by building a community of scholars engaged in progressive understanding of translanguaging through attendance at regular workshops, conferences, seminars, research training, and assemblies.

(3) Investing in individuals by supporting their linguistic skills, lifelong learning and workforce development
(3.1) Achieved through training, development and dissemination opportunities and events.
* 80 private, public, and third-sector participants complete OCN Network Level 3 award for research training
* 4 RAs and 2 DRs undertake research development training
* 40 participants attend one-week residential training programme, 'Doing Transformative Research in Translation Zones'
* 100+ participants register at final conference

(4) Expanding social inclusion, social tolerance, empathy and respect for linguistic diversity.
(4.1) Achieved by developing inclusive language policies and improved access to libraries, museums and city services.

(5) Creating a sustainable legacy of confident and articulate practitioners, new researchers and informed professionals able to influence policy on language in society.
(5.1) Achieved through training, development and dissemination events
 
Title AHRC-funded Connected Communities project with local arts organisation Faceless Arts investigating the role of 'welcome' in utopia for the Utopias 2016 (Jessica Bradley) 
Description Language researchers from the School of Education at the University of Leeds (UoL) will work in partnership with Wakefield-based arts organisation, Faceless Arts (FA), local charities and third sector organisations, and undergraduate and postgraduate students. We build on the Translation and Translanguaging: Investigating Linguistic and Cultural Transformations in Superdiverse Wards in Four UK Cities (TLANG) project, funded by the AHRC under its Translating Cultures theme. TLANG aims to develop 'new understandings of multilingual interaction in cities in the UK' through investigating how people communicate across languages and cultures. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2016 
Impact The video engaged in theoretical conversations about superdiversity/translanguaging and presented innovative ideas for new methodologies to research om changing city landscapes. 
URL https://welcomeutopia2016.wordpress.com/
 
Title Art Exhibition 'To Act To Know To Be' (Zhu Hua) 
Description Professor Zhu Hua in conversation with artist Ella McCartney discussing the Leverhulme artist in residence project 'Translanguaging and visual art'. The residency has provided an interdisciplinary opportunity to explore the multi-modal aspects of translanguaging including the boundaries between written or spoken language and visual languages. Artist Ella McCartney will discuss her forthcoming exhibition 'To Act To Know To Be' which opens on the 10th March 6-9pm at Lychee One Gallery, London. Exhibition Details Ella McCartney - To Act/ To Know/To Be 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2017 
Impact The exhibition engaged in theoretical conversations about superdiversity/translanguaging and presented innovative ideas for new methodologies to research om changing city landscapes. 
URL https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/talk-by-professor-zhu-hua-and-artist-ella-mccartney-tickets-317123555...
 
Title Bloomsbury Festival 
Description The 2016 Bloomsbury Festival, London - based on the theme of language - took part from 19 - 23 October. 
Type Of Art Artistic/Creative Exhibition 
Year Produced 2016 
Impact Made with over a hundred worldleading institutions, drama, dance and visual art colleges, creative businesses, theatres, cinemas, ground-breaking scientists, leading artists, academics, and publishing houses - Bloomsbury Festival is a truly unique celebration of this vibrant cultural quarter. LANGUAGE is our Festival theme for 2016, marking SOAS' Centenary. We are thrilled to offer you a fantastically varied programme that brings the theme to life. Expect street parties celebrating the language of dance, debates on the language of social change, poets battling it out with technology, a sound installation of endangered languages and many more creative ideas, projects and performances. 
URL http://bloomsburyfestival.org.uk/2016-brochure/
 
Title International Mother Language Day: Multilingual Poetry Workshop 
Description This event at the Library of Birmingham with Poet Laureate and TLANG CI, Adrian Blackledge, and Young Poet Laureate Serena Arthur, brought together writers from across the city to perform their poems in multiple languages for the UNESCO 'International Mother Language Day', which celebrates linguistic and cultural diversity, and multilingualism. The event reflected on what linguistic and cultural diversity means in our lives today, and how it enriches and challenges us. The event was a TLANG collaboration with our project partner, the Library of Birmingham. 
Type Of Art Creative Writing 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact The intention is to hold another event in 2016. However, the Library of Birmingham has faced significant funding cuts including a job cut for our collaborator Izzy Mohammed. 
URL http://www.birmingham-box.co.uk/event/international-mother-language-day-12-2014/
 
Title Network Assembly Film 
Description Network Assembly Film - commentary on the work of the TLANG Project: Communication in the Superdiverse City, 13th May 2016. .The film describes the impacts the project has had on different institutions approaches to linguistic and social diversity. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2016 
Impact It has been viewed 84 times in the last 6 months by an international audience. 65% UK 18% Somalia 7% Canada 3% Finland 2% Qatar 
URL http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/generic/tlang/digital-stories/index.aspx
 
Title Poetry Masterclass and reading with Simon Armitage 
Description Poet Simon Armitage visited the Library of Birmingham in partnership with the TLANG project to run a workshop and give a poetry reading. 
Type Of Art Performance (Music, Dance, Drama, etc) 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact None as yet. 
URL http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/generic/tlang/events/previous-events.aspx
 
Title Poetry by Professor Adrian Blackledge 
Description Co-investigator Prof. Adrian Blackledge is Poet Laureate 2014 - 2016. He has written a number of poems connected to the project either through our partnerships or through reference to the data. These include 'Ode to the Library of Birmingham' and 'Bull Ring Meat Market'. 
Type Of Art Creative Writing 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact A new collection of poems by Adrian Blackledge was published in March 2016. Title: 'Inkling', published by University of Birmingham Press. 
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OSmDwomaUiI&feature=youtu.be
 
Title Project film: Library of Birmingham 
Description The Birmingham case study team has produced two short films and we intend to produce others. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact None as yet. 
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S63faOwUAac&feature=youtu.be
 
Title Teamwork in the City Video 
Description Video commentary of project fieldwork research. Joe Ng is a volleyball coach, who is also a businessman. Here, he talks about communicating with volleyball players from different global origins. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2016 
Impact none to date 
URL http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/generic/tlang/digital-stories/index.aspx
 
Title Voices of the Bullring Markets, Birmingham 
Description This short film released by the team working at the University of Birmingham provides an introduction to the superdiverse nature of the Bullring markets. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery displays the film in its permanent collection in the 'Your Birmingham' gallery. 
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ea1rPkt82ms&feature=youtu.be
 
Description Translation and Translanguaging in Business Settings (Phase one)

This report provides a brief analytical summary of evidence which constitutes the outcome of the first of four phases of AHRC funded research project, 'Translation and Translanguaging: Investigating Linguistic and Cultural Transformations in Superdiverse Wards in Four UK Cities' (2014-2018; AH/L007096/1; 'TLANG'). TLANG takes an interdisciplinary orientation to researching language and superdiversity, and its evidence base is built from qualitative data (observations, audio and video recordings, textual artefacts, interviews, and photographs) and interpreted through a linguistic ethnography framework. The first phase of the project focused on small businesses. Subsequent phases are situated in contexts of heritage, sport, and law. The findings documented here are drawn from empirical investigations in four cities in phase one of the project. To reach our conclusions we brought together a cross-disciplinary team which shared an interest in the daily encounters of people engaged in entrepreneurial activity in city neighbourhoods. The project conducted detailed ethnographic investigations in small migrant businesses in Birmingham, Cardiff, Leeds, and London. Detailed reports can be found on the research project website at: (http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/generic/tlang/working-papers/index.aspx).

The most significant achievements from the award so far
The most significant achievements of Phase One of the award included the generation of new knowledge as follows:
1. The role of flexible communicative repertoires is crucial in the process of learning the skills, knowledge, and social practices required to navigate the spaces of the superdiverse city. A willingness to engage with others is a social skill practised in small business settings in superdiverse cities, and this engagement leads to new learning.

2. In small business encounters people acknowledge 'difference' as a positive resource for convivial communication, and this is a means of contributing to unity and social cohesion. Small businesses are often spaces in which regular encounters with difference contribute to the normalisation of diversity. They are contexts where people communicate by whatever means possible to achieve their objectives, and these communicative interactions are an important part of the fabric of local communities.

3. The day-to-day practices of business and entrepreneurship are normally characterised by good humour, conviviality, generosity of spirit, and people's willingness to get on with others. The everyday multiculturalism practised in small business settings contributes to social cohesion, playing a role in neighbourhoods which goes beyond commerce.

4. In small businesses people may engage in cross-cultural encounters, and negotiate meaning through improvised language resources, and these encounters limit 'differences' between people.

5. In the superdiverse city small businesses are sites where histories, heritages and localities overlap, and this overlapping can open up spaces for communication.

6. Small migrant businesses are often spaces where migration is positively valued by everyday entrepreneurs, and this attitude can help to counter negative discourses about migration and migrants. Small businesses can also play a role in maintaining transnational connections for migrants, and can contribute to migrants' support of other migrants with advice about navigating social structures and processes.

7. Small migrant businesses succeed when they establish a customer base through niche markets, and this success contributes to local economic growth.

8. Small migrant businesses sometimes operate as community hubs, providing practical support to people in need, including food, clothing, and even money.

9. Everyday entrepreneurs face challenges in setting up small businesses when they are confronted by bureaucratic demands beyond their skills and experience. New businesses would benefit from better focused support from local government in writing business plans and meeting bureaucratic requirements.


Meeting the award objectives
The award objectives are as set out below. In what follows we briefly detail progress towards meeting these objectives in the first of the four phases of the research. We will not account for objectives 6 or 7, as it is too early in the research project to have made significant progress in policy impact or researcher training and development.
In superdiverse localities in four UK cities we set out to:
1. understand translanguaging as communication in public spaces
2. understand translanguaging as communication in private spaces
3. understand translanguaging as communication in digital and social media spaces
4. understand local histories of communicative practices
5. develop transformative, interdisciplinary approaches to researching translanguaging as communication
6. develop the capacity of researchers to conduct high-quality research in the arts and humanities
7. inform local, national, and international policy in relation to superdiverse community settings
Here we summarise progress towards each of Objectives 1-5.

1. To understand translanguaging as communication in public spaces
Translanguaging refers to language practices that make visible the complexity of language exchanges among people with different histories. Translanguaging often goes beyond 'languages', and signals a trans-semiotic system with many meaning-making signs. In the evidence we collected we saw that translanguaging was often creative and transformative. It was creative in that people took available semiotic resources and made them more than the sum of their parts. It was transformative in that it created spaces for communication through the acknowledgement of, and openness to, social difference. We found that translanguaging was a record of mobility and experience; it was responsive to the market-place in which, and the people with whom, it occurred. Small businesses were spaces where communicative resources could be tried out, driven by a commercial imperative. Businesses exchanges were made successfully, even where interactants did not always share languages, proficiencies, or histories. Translanguaging was a means by which this was managed.

2. To understand translanguaging as communication in private spaces
We found that translanguaging was less common in the private realm than the public realm, at least partly because there was not the same commercial imperative, and often no pragmatic reason, to communicate across languages. However, talk about languages, and communication in different languages, did play a significant role in families. For example, in Leeds the key participant typically spoke Czech with her children, but in situations of urgency, or when speaking on complex topics, she spoke English. The children tended to use Czech when they were with their mother, but they spoke with each other in English. We found that multilingual language use was not only the topic of much of the talk: family dynamics operated through multilingual talk and translanguaging. We saw similar patterns in a Polish family's domestic life in London, and in a Chinese family in Birmingham. Translation and translanguaging were not restricted to the public and parochial realms, but were also a normative practice in private settings.

3. To understand translanguaging as communication in digital and social media spaces
The key participants in phase one of the research project were not equally enthusiastic contributors to, or consumers of, digital and social media. However, we saw evidence that they were using their mobile phones, and private messaging apps in particular, to establish and maintain networks of support that extended from the immediate city to their home countries; and to do business in new and innovative ways. Overall they demonstrated resourcefulness and creativity in their social media and other online activity. For example, in London we saw collaborative, creative multilingual practices in social media posts, as the family engaged in online puns and onomatopoeia, and this prompted other linguistic creativity outside of the social media domain. The butcher in Birmingham deployed multivoiced text messaging in Chinese as he teased his young employee about the employee's luxurious stay in hospital, and visits from his girlfriend. In Leeds the key participant told her children how happy it made her that they sent her text messages in Czech, in response to her own message, which was in Czech and English. Throughout this sequence messages were replete with emojis, which cut across languages. Across the four cities we saw that translanguaging in online and social media contexts was a normal, commonplace activity for business purposes and that it also contributed to a blurring of boundaries between work and home, public and private.

4. To understand local histories of communicative practices
'Linguistic landscapes' capture the presence of publicly visible written language: billboards, road signs, shop signs, graffiti, and other inscriptions in public space. We observed change through detailed mapping of public space in the four wards. We continue to photograph streetscapes in each of the cities to chart changing multilingual signage. We also commissioned major historical reports on linguistic change over time in each city ward. Taken together, this activity offers analysis of superdiverse space as it is inhabited and invested in by people, and as this investment changes over time. We further understand changing demographics in the four wards through narrative interviews with long-established residents and workers. For example, several of the market traders in Birmingham said they had worked on the market for more than forty years, and they were able to describe patterns of migration, and other historical contingencies, which had affected the locality over that period.

5. To develop transformative, interdisciplinary approaches to researching translanguaging as communication
The approach to researching translanguaging as communication in this project is transformative because it is interdisciplinary. There are several ways in which the project is both transformative and interdisciplinary. The four case studies are based in different departments, in four universities. Each of these academic homes orients us to a set of local institutional requirements, audiences, practices and demands. A second way in which we structure interdisciplinarity is by bringing together two senior researchers from different disciplinary fields to jointly lead each theme. In Phase One the two researchers were Kiran Trehan, Professor of Leadership and Enterprise Development (Birmingham), and Mike Baynham, Professor of TESOL (Leeds). Their leadership of the theme extends through discussion at team meetings, running data workshops, providing editorial feedback to case study report authors, and planning publications stemming from Phase One. A third way in which the project works in a transformative, interdisciplinary way is through engagement with non-university partners. In Phase One the research has gained hugely from the insights of Jayne Magee, who is Director of Operations (West Midlands) and Head of Community Impact (North West) for Business in the Community (BiC) (http://www.bitc.org.uk/). Across the wider research team our methodological orientation was characterised by both similarities and differences. Our way of dealing with this was to work through data jointly in team meetings and workshops. Another interdisciplinary dynamic was the co-existence of different research traditions, theories and frameworks. We engaged with this creatively to weave ideas together. Our disciplinary discourses and research customs, developed over career lifespans, were at time suspended as we engaged with and valued the work of others in areas very different from our own.

Translation and Translanguaging in Heritage Settings (Phase two)

Translanguaging: Heritage for the future

This report provides a brief analytical summary of evidence which constitutes the outcome of the second of four phases of AHRC funded research project, 'Translation and Translanguaging: Investigating Linguistic and Cultural Transformations in Superdiverse Wards in Four UK Cities' (2014-2018; AH/L007096/1; 'TLANG'). TLANG takes an interdisciplinary orientation to researching language and superdiversity, and its evidence base is built from qualitative data (observations, audio and video recordings, textual artefacts, interviews, and photographs) and interpreted through a linguistic e thnography framework.

The multi-site ethnographic project is directed by Angela Creese. The aim of the project is to investigate how people communicate when they bring different histories, biographies, and trajectories into interaction. The research was conducted across four cities in the UK: Birmingham, Cardiff, Leeds, and London. Sixteen sites in the four cities were identified as places where people meet and come into contact, and where in the course of this contact they are likely to engage in communicative practices. The research sites included small shops, market stalls, libraries, community centres, advice bureaux, and sports clubs. Key participants were selected from interested parties in each institution. In selecting key participants for ethnographic research the teams started with particular languages or groups of languages. In each city ward research teams took as one of their points of departure the National Census of 2011 to identify which languages other than English were reported to be most commonly spoken in that ward. In the Birmingham ward, Ladywood, varieties of Chinese were reported to be the most commonly spoken languages other than English; in Cardiff the language was Arabic; in Leeds the languages identified were Czech, Slovak, Roma, and Portuguese; and in London the language other than English most widely reported was Polish.

In this paper we report on the second phase of the study, in which we focused on sites differently associated with heritage. The second phase of the project focused on communicative city spaces in which heritage practices were observable. To reach our conclusions we brought together a cross-disciplinary team which shared an interest in the daily encounters of people engaged in libraries, arts, and advocacy activity. The project conducted detailed ethnographic investigations in these settings in Birmingham, Cardiff, Leeds, and London. Detailed reports can be found on the research project website at: (http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/generic/tlang/working-papers/index.aspx). In each of four city sites a key participant (two library staff, an advocacy worker, and an artist) collaborated with the research team over the course of four months. The research teams conducted observations, wrote field notes, made audio-recordings in the work-place and the home, collected online and digital communications, interviewed the key participants and other stakeholders, gathered institutional documentation, took photographs, and video-recorded each key participant at work. Key participants were remunerated financially for their participation in the research. The key participants were also invited to participate in a university-led research training course which offered an Open College Network qualification. In what follows we summarise analysis of heritage in practice in relation to key participants in each city.


The most significant achievements of Phase Two of the award

The most significant achievements of Phase Two of the award included the generation of new knowledge as follows:

1. For the research participants heritage is not immovable and fixed in the past, but is constructed in everyday communicative practice in the present. Moreover, heritage is oriented to the future as much as to the past, as participants play out in practice what they value, and what they want to safeguard for their contemporaries and future generations. A participant in Leeds, a young Slovak woman, has a liminal position as a Roma person. She had Roma parents yet she grew up in a children's home where Slovak, rather than a Romani language, was dominant. She sometimes refers to the Roma in Leeds using the first person pronouns and possessives of the insider ('us', 'our people'), and sometimes not ('those people').

2. Translanguaging in practice is an important resource in heritage work in superdiverse cities. When people with different biographies and backgrounds come into contact in heritage settings they make use of whatever semiotic repertoires are available to communicate. An artist in London deploys repertoires which index an ironic orientation to cultural typification (e.g. a red dress with white polka dots and a scarf); in a Birmingham library an information assistant makes use of resources normally associated with a wide range of languages for convivial interaction.

3. In everyday interactions between people in the city, heritage is negotiable. A young Slovak Roma woman and her brother in Leeds work out what counts as 'Slovak' and 'Roma' heritage as they plan their future; a Polish artist in London employs a subversive yet playful, strategic yet practical, approach to managing 'Polish' identity positions, negotiating misalignment between identities she orients to, and identities assigned to her by others.

4. Heritage is not unitary, but is multiple, and multivoiced. In Cardiff, practices in which a university librarian invoked heritage included contact with family members in the UK, Iraq, and elsewhere; faith practices related to Islamic beliefs; contact with other people of Kurdish heritage in Cardiff; and recalled and current practice as a librarian in the university library service. Heritage was not limited to connections with territory of origin. It was the heritage of the city of Cardiff, of the university, of changing technology, and changing practices.

5. Heritage in practice is a resource for convivial interaction. A Customer Experience Assistant in the Library of Birmingham engaged convivially with library users in brief interactions where a multitude of histories, trajectories, and expressions converged and overlapped. Such repeated, patterned conviviality constituted a means to safeguard a positive orientation to superdiversity in the present and the future.

6. Heritage may be deployed as a commodity for business. In Leeds a young Slovak Roma woman and her brother aspire to set up cultural spaces for the Roma people in their area. The activities they hope to initiate will safeguard and transmit to others elements of intangible heritage - including music, food, and dance. She aims to transform her available cultural capital into something that will preserve and consolidate heritage, but also earn her a living. She does this by trying to set up a social enterprise, entailing the completion of a business plan.

7. Heritage can be a site of, and catalyst for, the creative arts. A London-based artist is ambivalent about any straightforward notion of 'Polish cultural heritage'. Her performance is highly original, replete with multiple voices, strategic stereotyping, acts of playful subversiveness, meta-commentaries and reflection. Heritage is a resource for creative challenge, which thrives on ambiguity and spontaneity.

8. Heritage is transportable and mobile. For a Birmingham participant originally from Hong Kong, heritage is instantiated in objects and artefacts, gifts and memories, and physical ways of moving and being. Each of the objects is accompanied by a discourse which constructs both personal and cultural heritage.

9. Heritage is narrated. For a participant in Cardiff a dimension of heritage is her narrative of migration. Her personal history in Kurdistan and Iraq, her journey to the UK via Algiers, her trajectory of belonging, are very much with her in the present. Narratives of home, of travel, and of resettlement are a feature of all the heritage stories told by participants in the four cities.

10. Heritage has a social dimension. Cultural artefacts, practices, foods, music and so on typically associated with specific heritages are a resource for social interaction; they are also transformed as they are transmitted, changed in practice as they are recontextualised in new settings.



Meeting the award objectives

The award objectives are as set out below. In what follows we briefly detail progress towards meeting these objectives in Phase Two of the research. In superdiverse localities in four UK cities we set out to:

1. understand translanguaging as communication in public spaces

2. understand translanguaging as communication in private spaces

3. understand translanguaging as communication in digital and social media spaces

4. understand local histories of communicative practices

5. develop transformative, interdisciplinary approaches to researching translanguaging as communication

6. develop the capacity of researchers to conduct high-quality research in the arts and humanities

7. inform local, national, and international policy in relation to superdiverse community settings


Here we summarise progress towards each of the objectives.

1. To understand translanguaging as communication in public spaces

Translanguaging refers to language practices that make visible the complexity of language exchanges among people with different histories. Translanguaging often goes beyond 'languages', and signals a trans-semiotic system with many meaning-making signs. In the evidence we collected in Phase Two we observed translanguaging in practice in heritage settings. The identification of what counts as shared heritage for a young Slovak Roma woman is in part an interactional achievement, rather than always a priori fact. In order to make use of her heritage resources as a commodity, she was required to write a business plan for the city council. This entailed not only interlingual translanguaging, as she moved between Slovak and English to complete the required template, but also intralingual and intersemiotic translanguaging, as she negotiated the bureaucratic demands of the genre and artefact.

2. To understand translanguaging as communication in private spaces

Translation and translanguaging are not restricted to the public and parochial realms, but are also a normative practice in private settings. For example, the Leeds participant uses Slovak to speak with her siblings as well as other people from the Czech Republic or Slovakia. Her Slovak, however, is heavily influenced by the Czech language. The same happens with her siblings. She says, 'we don't speak proper Slovakian, we don't speak proper Czech, we mix'. She sometimes calls this language 'Czechoslovakian'. She says that she only started mixing the two languages after moving to the UK, as a result of being in contact with people from the Czech Republic. Another influence could have been the language spoken by some of the Roma - mixing of Czech and Slovak being one of the characteristics of 'Romani ethnolect'. In London the Polish participant deploys language play in private settings. Verbal provocation is one of the ways in which she breaks taboos and enacts subversiveness, or in her words, does 'something offensive' and does something in order 'to shock'. Her translanguaging practices are imbued with creativity, such as language play, double voicing, singing and mobilisation of multiple semiotic resources.

3. To understand translanguaging as communication in digital and social media spaces

Digital and social media practices in heritage settings are shaped by the participants' different levels of digital literacy awareness, by the purposes for which they use digital technologies, and by the values they hold and other aspects of their biographies. For the Birmingham participant, the digital spaces created by SMS and WhatsApp communications offer opportunities for consolidating family and friendship ties in polite and conventional ways, for displaying her interest in language, and for learning new linguistic practices and social roles; in Leeds, Facebook enables the participant to share significant moments of her life which indirectly express her identity and leave traces of her cultural history; while a London artist's social media practices can themselves be seen as heritage resources which intersect with her cultural history and values. In each case, however, we see how digital technologies afford a space where individual identities can be performed, where personal, social and professional connections can be established and maintained, and where that which is valued by these women can be expressed and shared.

4. To understand local histories of communicative practices

'Linguistic landscapes' capture the presence of publicly visible written language: billboards, road signs, shop signs, graffiti, and other inscriptions in public space. We observed change through detailed mapping of public space in the four wards. We continue to photograph streetscapes in each of the cities to chart changing multilingual signage. We also commissioned major historical reports on linguistic change over time in each city ward. Taken together, this activity offers analysis of superdiverse space as it is inhabited and invested in by people, and as this investment changes over time. We further understand changing demographics in the four wards through narrative interviews with long-established residents and workers. For example, several of the library workers in Birmingham said they had worked in the (previous and current) library for more than forty years, and they were able to describe patterns of migration, and other historical contingencies, which had affected the locality over that period.

5. To develop transformative, interdisciplinary approaches to researching translanguaging as communication
The approach to researching translanguaging as communication in this project is transformative because it is interdisciplinary. There are several ways in which the project is both transformative and interdisciplinary. The four case studies are based in different departments, in four universities. Each of these academic homes orients to a set of local institutional requirements, audiences, practices and demands. A second way in which we structure interdisciplinarity is by bringing together two senior researchers from different disciplinary fields to jointly lead each theme. In Phase Two the senior researchers were: Mike Robinson, Professor of Cultural Heritage, University of Birmingham, and Director, Ironbridge International Institute for Cultural Heritage (Birmingham); and Adrian Blackledge, Professor of Bilingualism and Director of the MOSAIC Centre for Research on Multilingualism, University of Birmingham. Their leadership of the theme extends through discussion at team meetings, running data workshops, providing editorial feedback to case study report authors, and planning publications stemming from Phase Two. A third way in which the project works in a transformative, interdisciplinary way is through engagement with non-university partners. In Phase Two the research has gained hugely from the insights of Toby Watley, Director of Collections, Birmingham Museums Trust, and Stacy Bains, Community Service Developer, Culture Coventry, and the Herbert Museum, Coventry. They both took an active role in analysis of data, and contributed to workshop discussions. Across the wider research team methodological orientation was characterised by both similarities and differences. Our way of dealing with this was to work through data jointly in team meetings and workshops. Another interdisciplinary dynamic was the co-existence of different research traditions, theories and frameworks. We engaged with this creatively to weave ideas together. Our disciplinary discourses and research customs, developed over career lifespans, were at time suspended as we engaged with and valued the work of others in areas very different from our own.

5. To develop the capacity of researchers to conduct high-quality research in the arts and humanities

Throughout the project opportunities are provided for the capacity development of members of the research team. In Phase Two these opportunities have focused on the team members who are PhD researchers. Jessica Bradley won an AHRC Connected Communities Grant, 'Welcome in Utopias Festival'. From March to June 2016 the Festival supported activities across the UK bringing together researchers and communities to creatively explore diverse perspectives on community futures and what 'utopia' means for communities in the 21st Century. Piotr Wegorowski earned an internship to the Welsh Assembly. This is a RCUK doctoral students' policy internship scheme, and has provided Piotr with an opportunity to learn about a policy-making environment.

7. To inform local, national, and international policy in relation to superdiverse community settings.
The ongoing and emergent findings of the research have been presented to local and national
policy-makers during Phase Two. Professor Adrian Blackledge presented findings as evidence to the Everyday Entrepreneurs Inquiry of the All Party Parliamentary Small Shops Group at the House of Commons. Dr. James Simpson gave expert evidence to the All-Party Parliamentary Group on Social Integration (English Language Session). Birmingham Museums and Art Gallery displays the research project film, 'Voices of the Bullring Markets' in its 'Your Birmingham' gallery, where it is on permanent display and available for viewing by the general public. Councillor Brigid Jones, Cabinet Member for Children, Families and Schools, Birmingham City Council, participated as a key panel speaker at the Network Assembly of the project.
Exploitation Route Taking forward the findings
1. Business Phase:

The findings of the research will be of significance in two areas in particular: (i) in the support of small and medium migrant businesses, and (ii) in the development of more sophisticated understandings of the superdiverse city.
It is clear from the analysis of evidence in Phase One that small and medium migrant businesses contribute to the local economy, but do much more than this. They are often community hubs which offer support to new migrants; they are sites of everyday multiculturalism and commonplace diversity; they are contexts where people can try out and try on new communicative repertoires; they are places where histories, heritages, and localities overlap and come into contact; they are places where people communicate by whatever means possible to achieve their commercial objectives; and they play a role in maintaining transnational connections for migrants.
We presented emergent findings to the Everyday Entrepreneurs Inquiry of the All Party Parliamentary Small Shops Group at the House of Commons in July 2015. Elaborated findings will be reported to an interdisciplinary Network Assembly at Thinktank, Birmingham, in May 2016, which will promote exchange between stakeholders including academics, professionals, and practitioners in business and entrepreneurship, and national and city level policy makers, including politicians and members of Birmingham Chamber of Commerce. Business in the Community is a collaborative partner in the organisation of this event. Presentation of research outcomes will be accessible, evidence-based, and tangible. The social, political and economic consequences of the research findings will be foregrounded through engagement with participants. The day will consist of presentations, film, and panel and audience discussion and debate.
Reports on each of the three city case studies from Phase One of the project, together with a summary of the reports, are available on the project website.

2. Heritage Phase:
The findings of the research will be of significance in two areas in particular: (i) in the creation and dissemination of new knowledge about what people value and want to keep for the present and future; and (ii) in the development of more sophisticated understandings of the superdiverse city.

It is clear from the analysis of evidence in Phase Two that what people value as heritage is not limited to old buildings, ancient sites, monuments and masterpieces, but also includes practices, values, and narratives in which heritage is constituted as mobile, transportable, changeable, and under construction. Furthermore, for the participants in this study heritage is a resource for creativity, and has value as a commodity. Heritage is not unitary or simple, but is a complex of mobility and re-settlement.

We presented emergent findings of this phase of the research to the All-Party Parliamentary Group on Social Integration. Elaborated findings were reported to an interdisciplinary Network Assembly at Thinktank, Birmingham, in May 2016, which was attended by professionals and practitioners in the heritage sector, and national and city level policy makers, including Birmingham city councillors. Birmingham Museums Trust was a collaborative partner in the organisation of this event. The social, political and economic consequences of the research findings were foregrounded through engagement with participants.

A film based on the research in Phase Two was produced by a community film-maker. This is displayed on the project website, and has been viewed more than 300 times. Reports on each of the city case studies from Phase Two of the project, together with a summary of the reports, are available on the project website.
Sectors Creative Economy,Education,Leisure Activities, including Sports, Recreation and Tourism,Government, Democracy and Justice,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections,Retail
URL http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/generic/tlang/index.aspx
 
Description TLANG findings have been used 1. Politically: a. On 14th July 2015, Professor Adrian Blackledge presented findings from the TLANG research project as evidence to the Everyday Entrepreneurs Inquiry of the All Party Parliamentary Small Shops Group at the House of Commons. b. On 3rd March 2017, Dr. James Simpson gave evidence as an Expert to the APPG on Social Integration English Language Session 2. City and Community: Birmingham Museums and Art Gallery displays the project TLANG film 'Voices of the Bullring Markets' in its 'Your Birmingham' gallery where it is on permanent display and available for viewing to the general public.
First Year Of Impact 2015
Sector Creative Economy,Education,Leisure Activities, including Sports, Recreation and Tourism,Retail
Impact Types Cultural,Societal
 
Description Emilee Moore (TLANG Leeds) member of group of experts on language and literacy, Education Dept, Government of Catalonia.
Geographic Reach Europe 
Policy Influence Type Membership of a guideline committee
Impact This collaboration has meant drafting guidelines for all state primary and secondary school teachers in Catalonia about how best to integrate the full linguistic repertoires of students in teaching reading comprehension skills in English as a foreign language for all students, and in Catalan and Spanish for students who are newcomers to the Catalan education system. The guidelines are currently being reviewed by different stakeholders and will be published and disseminated by the Department of Education of the Government of Catalonia in the near future. This action is meant to improve educational outcomes.
 
Description Expert Interview, APPG on Social Integration English Language (James Simpson, CI)
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
Impact No impact yet.
URL http://www.socialintegrationappg.org.uk/
 
Description James Simpson (Project CI) Chair of MESH (Migrant English Support Hub)
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
Impact Migrant English Support Hub (MESH) is a Leeds-based consortium established in 2014 bringing together providers of classes of English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) for refugees and new arrivals in Leeds, statutory service providers, and other key stakeholders in the city. TLang Co-I James Simpson is the founder and Chair of MESH, whose work develops from research he led on ESOL provision in Leeds in 2010-11 (see Simpson et al 2011). MESH coordinates important information about English language learning to help newcomers to navigate their new lives, supporting social cohesion and integration within Leeds. Beneficiaries are adult migrants in Leeds and local community organisations and groups dedicated to supporting them in their efforts to settle and belong. In the absence of any other such initiative, MESH created the Learning English in Leeds (LEL) coordinating website (www.lel.help) for potential learners of ESOL, their advisors, and providers of ESOL classes across Leeds. The clearer picture of the rich range of ESOL classes in Leeds that the work of MESH affords is accompanied by significant user engagement. There are over 2000 visits a month to the LEL site. ESOL providers working with refugees (St Vincent's Support Centre; Learning Partnerships) have seen an increase in referrals since the instigation of LEL. Potential students from across our diverse community, including marginalised refugees seeking asylum from war-torn Syria, Iraq and Somalia, have made use of LEL's information network to identify ESOL classes. The resource saves time and money for the services that benefit from it, and advisors who have reported being able to direct potential students towards appropriate ESOL provision as part of their work include: the manager of the Leeds Refugee Forum; tutors and advice staff at Leeds City College, Leeds City Council One Stop Centre staff; the LCC translation and interpreting service team. This demonstrates our clear contribution towards the enhanced social cohesion and integration of newcomers.
URL https://doinggoodleeds.org.uk/news/2014/05/16/mesh-%E2%80%93-a-new-esol-website-for-leeds-2014051516...
 
Description Live Q&A: how can we better support community languages
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
URL http://www.theguardian.com/education/2014/nov/12/community-languages-policy-live-chat
 
Description Network Assembly Film
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
Impact Film of TLANG Network Assembly (May 2016) released. Non-academic partners involved; Toby Watley, Director of Colelctions, Birmingham Museums Trust Don Flynn, Director, Migrants' Rights Network Abid Hussain, Director, Arts Council Jayne Magee, Director, Business in the Community Orit Azaz, Independent Artistic Director Gurjit Singh Gill, Head of School, Birmingham Supplementary Schools' Consortium Simon Cane, Director of Public & Cultural Engagement, UCL
URL http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/generic/tlang/digital-stories/index.aspx
 
Description Report to the All Party Parliamentary Small Shops Group at the House of Commons
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
URL http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/research/activity/education/mosaic/news-events/tlang-reports-to-the-hous...
 
Description AHRC Being Human Festival
Amount £3,000 (GBP)
Organisation Arts & Humanities Research Council (AHRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK)
Start 11/2014 
End 11/2014
 
Description AHRC Connected Communities
Amount £20,000 (GBP)
Organisation Arts & Humanities Research Council (AHRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK)
Start 01/2016 
End 06/2016
 
Description Beatriu de Pinós postdoctoral fellowship (AGAUR) - Emillee Moore (University of Leeds)
Amount € 71,734 (EUR)
Funding ID 2014 BP_A 00085 
Organisation Agencia de Gestión de Ayudas Universitarias y de Investigación 
Sector Public
Country Spain, Kingdom of
Start 10/2015 
End 09/2017
 
Description ESRC Festival of Social Science: "Belonging: Happiness in the city" (engagement event led by Frances Rock, CI Cardiff)
Amount £1,000 (GBP)
Organisation Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK)
Start 11/2016 
End 11/2016
 
Description Educational Engagement
Amount £650 (GBP)
Organisation University of Leeds 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK)
Start 09/2015 
End 08/2016
 
Description Family Language Policy: A multi-level investigation of multilingual practices in transnational Families
Amount £840,182 (GBP)
Funding ID ESRC: ES/N019105/1 
Organisation Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK)
Start 07/2017 
End 07/2019
 
Description LSSI (Leeds Social Sciences Institute)
Amount £1,995 (GBP)
Organisation University of Leeds 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK)
Start 02/2015 
End 12/2015
 
Description Leverhulme Artist in Residence Grant (Zhu Hua, Project CI)
Amount £14,338 (GBP)
Funding ID 2015-AIR-035 
Organisation The Leverhulme Trust 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK)
Start 10/2015 
End 06/2016
 
Description Messaging in the Midlands, a project exploring translanguaging via mobile messaging apps in the West Midlands, funded by the Institute for Research into Superdiversity (IRiS) at the University of Birmingham
Amount £650 (GBP)
Organisation University of Birmingham 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK)
Start 03/2015 
End 06/2015
 
Description Overcoming Barriers to University Education in South Africa (OBUESA)
Amount £186,228 (GBP)
Funding ID AH/P009433/1 
Organisation Arts & Humanities Research Council (AHRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK)
Start 11/2016 
End 07/2017
 
Description Predoctoral mobility grant for Massimiliano to join Leeds TLANG team)
Amount € 6,036 (EUR)
Funding ID EEBB-I-16-11584 
Organisation Government of Spain 
Sector Public
Country Spain, Kingdom of
Start 09/2016 
End 12/2016
 
Description Undergraduate studentship under the University Research and Leadership Scholarship scheme, Faculty of Education, Social Sciences and Law, University of Leeds. (Simpson, J)
Amount £0 (GBP)
Organisation University of Leeds 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK)
Start 01/2017 
End 12/2018
 
Description University of Leeds Educational Engagement; "Landscape Curators" (James Simpson CI & Jessica Bradley, Doctoral Researcher))
Amount £5,000 (GBP)
Organisation University of Leeds 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK)
Start 08/2016 
End 11/2016
 
Description University of Leeds LSSI "Migration and Settlement" (James Simpson CI & Jessica Bradley, Doctoral Reearcher)
Amount £15,000 (GBP)
Organisation University of Leeds 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK)
Start 07/2016 
End 07/2016
 
Title Practitioner Research Programme (PRP) 
Description In ethnography we work with research participants. In each phase of our project there are at least four key participants (KPs) who we research with. We have set up a specific research programme to train KPs in data collection methods, ethics, transcription and preliminary analysis. Our key participants are people unlikely to typically enter the university for training purposes including butchers, local shop owners, community advisers, customer relation assistants, community artists, community sport coaches. Each key participant receives bespoke training either centrally at Birmingham or locally in their satellite case study venues. Our project PRP is linked with a wider PRP programme at UoB. The programme is accredited and our KPs can exit with a Open College Network award. 
Type Of Material Model of mechanisms or symptoms - human 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact To date 10 key participants and researchers have registered to complete the Open College Network (OCN) level 3 qualification following the PRP training programme. 
URL http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/research/activity/superdiversity-institute/practitioner-research-program...
 
Description Bloomsbury Festival (Orit Azaz) 
Organisation Bloomsbury Festival
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Jessica Bradley, Mike Baynham, Sam McKay and Joe Gilmour-Rees (UoL); Zhu Hua, Daria Pytel (Birkbeck); Li Wei (IoE, UCL) from the TLANG team attended and presented at the Bloomsbury Festival through the link with Orit Azaz who was arranging the language-based public engagement work at UCL. The following was presented: - the Migration and Home: Welcome in Utopia work by the Leeds team/Faceless Arts including a craft workshop and a performance (funded by AHRC, Connected Communities programme 2016) - Ella McCartney's dance performance from her Leverhulme artist in residence grant with Zhu Hua. - The Roma community dancers and performers, organised by Zhu Hua and Daria Pytel. - an Open Conversation about translanguaging, organised by Orit Azaz and including the above team members. This involved 10-15 participants from the festival public in total.
Collaborator Contribution TLANG participation in the Bloomsbury festival coordinated by Orit Azaz. Faceless Arts contributed creative work. Ella McCartney contributed creative work. Roma community dancers and performers contributed creative work.
Impact continued collaboration with Orit Azaz. Continued collaboration with Bloomsbury Festival through Orit Azaz.
Start Year 2016
 
Description Collaboration with the Trinity Centre, Cardiff and Made in Roath, Cardiff. 
Organisation Welsh Refugee Council
Department The Trinity Centre
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution We have attended "drop in" sessions in order to support new migrants to Wales and to provide information about an event which we were running to facilitate contact between new migrants and longer term residents. We then ran an all-day, academically driven event during which these two groups were brought into contact through a range of activities based on themes raised in the Tlang Project. We created a number of installations with which participants could interact together on the day to facilitate conversations and developments of social connections. One the day, we provided a team to provide practical help and we ran the activities and installations we provided.
Collaborator Contribution We had two main partners in this project. First, the Trinity Centre which is a third sector organisation which supports new migrants to Cardiff. They provided administrative and creative support to our collaborative activities, provided a venue and facilitated our contact with participants for the all-day event which took place. Our second collaborator was Helen Clifford from the arts organisation Made in Roath. She took the lead on creative aspects of the event by devising and curating a number of activities and installations for the all-day event. Helen attended the event and facilitated and constructed the activities she planned. We had a third partner, Space 4 U, which is another third sector group which uses the Trinity Centre and offers drop-in facilities for people seeking asylum. Space 4 U helped us to publicise the event and attended on the day, providing an installation on a recent photographic project that they had completed with people seeking asylum.
Impact The event "Belonging: Happiness in the City" has been the main outcome of this collaboration to date. This event took place all day on Saturday 12th November 2016. The event resulted in a series of blog posts on the Tlang blog (urls: https://tlangblog.wordpress.com/2016/12/18/belonging-happiness-in-the-city-part-one-preparation/ https://tlangblog.wordpress.com/2017/01/03/belonging-happiness-in-the-city-part-2-on-the-day/ https://tlangblog.wordpress.com/2017/01/17/belonging-happiness-in-the-city-part-three-on-the-day-continued/
Start Year 2016
 
Description Connected Communities Utopias Festival 2016 
Organisation Connected Communities
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Migration & Home. AHRC-funded Connected Communities Utopias 2016 Festival project. Collaboration with Faceless Arts, RETAS Leeds. Internal collaborations with Performance and Cultural Industries, University of Leeds. (Simpson and Bradley). James Simpson, Jessica Bradley Development of project with Faceless Arts and RETAS Leeds. Delivery of project with Faceless Arts and RETAS Leeds Evaluation of project
Collaborator Contribution development of arts-based work with refugees and asylum seekers
Impact Development of Migration and Settlement: Extending the Welcome project (£15,000 funded through University of Leeds LSSI)
Start Year 2016
 
Description LangScape Curators 
Organisation University of Leeds
Department Leeds Institute of Health Sciences
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution LangScape Curators is research- and practice-led educational and public engagement, leading from methodologies and findings from the TLANG project and from creative practice. LangScape Curators. Educational Engagement project working with artists and with IntoUniversity Leeds East and Leeds South. Partnership with Educational Engagement Social Sciences Cluster. (Bradley, Simpson and Moore)
Collaborator Contribution The collaboration was set up by Jessica Bradley, James Simpson and Emilee Moore, working also with an artist-researcher Louise Atkinson. This was developed through creating arts-based materials for engagement work with children and young people.
Impact This is a multi-disciplinary partnership. It links the TLANG project and School of Education to the School of Fine Art, History of Art and Cultural Studies and to the charity IntoUniversity. The work is funded through the University of Leeds educational engagement social sciences cluster. The outputs are as follows: - creation and development of a suite of materials based on linguistic landscape research - website of photographs and art works by participants www.langscapecurators.tumblr.com
Start Year 2016
 
Description Migrants' Rights Network 
Organisation Migrants' Rights Network
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution We report to them our research findings in the form of blogs, summaries, presentations and papers. We also re-tweet our overlapping interests in migration issues.
Collaborator Contribution They are represented on the project's national steering group. They provide guidance and advice to the project team in their area of expertise, particularly in relation to policy.
Impact Joint presentation at project events, including the launch conference and forthcoming networking assembly.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Migration and Settlement 
Organisation Faceless Arts
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Migration & Settlement. Funded by LSSI (Leeds Social Sciences Institute Impact Acceleration Fund). Partnership with Faceless Arts, RETAS Leeds and the Ark, Harehills.(Simpson, Bradley and Baynham).
Collaborator Contribution James Simpson, Jessica Bradley, Mike Baynham (TLANG, School of Education, UoL) and Sam McKay (PCI, UoL) Development of co-produced arts-based and linguistic research into concept of 'settlement' working with Faceless Arts and RETAS Leeds.
Impact To date the work is leading to the development of a large grant proposal for an arts-based language research project.
Start Year 2016
 
Description Multilingualism and Mobility WUN Network 
Organisation Worldwide Universities Network (WUN)
Country Global 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution James Simpson, Jessica Bradley and Mike Baynham have contributed to the network's seminar series: ' Translanguaging Business and Heritage: Implications for language education.' Invited presentation at Multilingualism & Mobility in the Northern & Southern Hemispheres (WUN networking event), University of Sheffield, 2 July 2015 (James Simpson & Jessica Bradley).
Collaborator Contribution The Worldwide Universities Network (WUN) is a leading global higher education and research network made up of 21 universities, spanning 11 countries on five continents. Together we work to drive international research collaboration and address issues of global significance. WUN is the most active global higher education and research network with 90 active research initiatives, engaging over 2,000 researchers and students collaborating on a diverse range of projects. These initiatives are committed to addressing some of the world's most urgent challenges and are supported by prolific partners such as the United Nations Foundation, World Bank, OECD and World Health Organization. We focus our research on four globally significant themes that drive our programmes and ignite our teamwork: Responding to Climate Change Public Health (Non-Communicable Disease) Global Higher Education and Research Understanding Cultures. Within each of these areas is a collection of high-quality collaborative research programmes involving a number of WUN member universities along with other academic institutions, government, international agencies, foundations and industry. In order to achieve collective objectives, WUN draws upon the combined resources and intellectual power of its membership. By creating new opportunities for international collaboration, WUN enables members to extend the reach and scope of their research and establish lasting partnerships that enrich their work. WUN also fosters the next generation of researchers through its Research Mobility Programme (RMP). This program provides opportunities for early-career researchers, including postgraduate and postdoctoral students, to expand their knowledge, gain international experience and broaden their professional networks. The RMP provides access to expertise and resources that are not available within the awardee's own institution, while exposing them to ideas and cultures different from their own. WUN researchers can also apply for catalytic funding from the WUN Research Development Fund to spark collaborative activities. WUN is proud of its ability to effect positive results in areas that impact both our immediate and long term futures. Through international collaboration, we will continue to create new knowledge, nurture emerging research talent and ultimately transform the world for the better.
Impact See above
Start Year 2016
 
Description Partnership with Birmingham Museum 
Organisation Birmingham Museums Trust
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution A major project output is the making of films from the data collected across the project's phases (business, heritage, sport and law) in the Birmingham case study site. One film has been taken up through our partnership with Birmingham Museum and Art Galleries (BMAG). BMAG displays the film 'Voices of the Bullring Markets' in its 'Your Birmingham' gallery where it is on permanent display.
Collaborator Contribution They have provided us with an important dissemination space.
Impact Film posted on our project website but also displayed at BMAG. Joint presentation at project events, including the project's launch conference, Museums Association Annual Conference on 'Understanding Diversity' and forthcoming networking assembly.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Partnership with Business in the Community 
Organisation Business in the Community
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution We report to them our research findings in the form of blogs, summaries, presentations and papers. We also re-tweet our overlapping interests in migration issues.
Collaborator Contribution They are represented on the project's national steering group. They provide guidance and advice to the project team in their area of expertise, particularly in relation to policy.
Impact Joint presentation at project events, including the launch conference and forthcoming networking assembly.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Partnership with Law Centres Network 
Organisation Law Centres Network
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution We report to them our research findings in the form of blogs, summaries, presentations and papers. We also re-tweet our overlapping interests in law and migration issues.
Collaborator Contribution They are represented on the project's national steering group. They provide guidance and advice to the project team in their area of expertise, particularly in relation to policy.
Impact Joint presentation at project events, including the launch conference and forthcoming networking assembly.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Partnership with Sporting Equals 
Organisation Sporting Equals
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution We report to them our research findings in the form of blogs, summaries, presentations and papers. We also re-tweet our overlapping interests in sport and diversity issues.
Collaborator Contribution They are represented on the project's national steering group. They provide guidance and advice to the project team in their area of expertise, particularly in relation to inclusion.
Impact Joint presentation at project events, including the project's launch conference and forthcoming networking assembly.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Partnership with the Library of Birmingham 
Organisation Library of Birmingham
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution We report to them our research findings in the form of blogs, summaries, presentations and papers. We also re-tweet our overlapping interests in issues of heritage.
Collaborator Contribution They are represented on the project's national steering group. They provide guidance and advice to the project team in their area of expertise, particularly in relation to policy.
Impact The Library of Birmingham (LOB) and the TLANG project jointly convened a creative writing workshop on International Mother Language Day. This was held in the LOB. They have also taken part in joint presentation activities such as the project's launch, and a school/academic event with another of the Large Grant Translating Cultures teams in Edinburgh.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Refereed conference paper: 'Investigating linguistic and cultural transformations in sport'.Callaghan, J. & Hanusova, (Research fellows, Leeds University) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Callaghan, J. (2016) (with Jolana Hanusova). Refereed conference paper: 'Investigating linguistic and cultural transformations in sport'. International Association of Language and Intercultural Communication, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Spain. (November 2016)
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://ialic2016bcn.com/assets/programme.pdf
 
Description '"It's all common sense!": The ethics of digital ethnography in a team project', Cardiff university (Caroline Tagg, Agnieszka Lyons, Amal Hallak, Jolana Hanusova and Rachel Hu - team members) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact '"It's all common sense!": The ethics of digital ethnography in a team project' with Caroline Tagg, Agnieszka Lyons, Amal Hallak, Jolana Hanusova and Rachel Hu The ethics of online research methods: Language & new media SIG (Cardiff University)
Abstract: In this talk we discuss the ethical issues faced when collecting online data as part of a large team ethnographic project exploring multilingualism as a resource in four cities across the UK. The project involves shadowing key participants at work and asking them to record themselves and their families at home as well as to submit examples of their social media use (WhatsApp, Skype conversations, SMS). Involving our participants in data collection and using social media data alongside other data sets raise a number of ethical issues.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description 'Grappling with data, theory and interpretation' Invited workshop Researching language as social practice (Birmingham University) Frances Rock (Project CI) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact 'Grappling with data, theory and interpretation' Invited workshop Researching language as social practice: Enhancing our skills in the process of working with language data (Birmingham University)
Abstract: In this session, I will examine ways of working with data from a range of institutional sites within the domain of policing. This domain is rich with sites for fascinating data collection but also brings its own particular challenges around such issues as data security, ethics and one's position as a researcher. These challenges have potential knock-on effects for analysis and theorising.
I will initially introduce a range of different forms of data to illustrate the diversity of material I have worked with over the past 15 years. This will make it possible to review some of the contingencies which figure in potentially sensitive policing environments.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description 'Lost in translation: Representation and expertise within a police control room' CaLL Seminar on Expertise (Cardiff University) Frances Rock (Project CI) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact Abstract: Essex Police handles approximately 3,000 calls from the public daily. Of these, an estimated 1,000 are 999 calls. 1,200 of these calls will result in the creation of a police incident.
Call handlers use their expertise to elicit from the caller what has occurred, where it has occurred, what offences have or may have been committed and the level of threat harm or risk present. This information is represented within the new discourse domain of the police incident and is passed to a dispatch operator for the allocation of police officers via the radio.
Incidents are a construct created by the call handler of the events represented to them by the caller, and are rarely a verbatim account of the call received.
Dispatch operators allocate officers via the radio with their understanding of events, they will typically create yet another version of the event to represent to officers a picture of what has or is occurring. The police officers' knowledge of events unfolding is based upon this final representation.
This series of constructions and representations form recontextualizations (Rock, Heffer and Conley 2013) of events as information travels through a series of discourse domains. Using the notion of recontextualization and textual travel (Rock, Heffer and Conley 2013). We present examples of emergency calls, the incidents created and radio speech that accompanies them. Taking up ideas raised by Garner and Johnson (2013), we will show how representations, constructs, recontextualization and textual travel have a significant impact upon the callers reporting the incidents, the call handlers, radio dispatch operators and attending police officers. We demonstrate what is represented as real is often not, that what is constructed can miss the real threat, and that the outcomes can have dire consequences. This provides for a rich view of expertise as situated and in flux.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://blogs.cardiff.ac.uk/call/wp-content/uploads/sites/43/2015/08/Symposium-schedule.pdf
 
Description 'Studying the workplace using Applied Linguistics' British Association of Applied Linguistics Annual Conference (Aston University) Frances Rock (Project CI) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact Abstract: This paper presents linguistic ethnographic research on various areas of language in policing. The focus is on communication between police officers and the lay people who they come into contact with, particularly when that contact requires explanation with the aim of producing 'understanding'. Past research on policing had tended towards an experimental approach in the psychological mode and towards the use of elicitation-led methods of data collection. In this paper, I overview the iterative approach which I used to develop responsive methods of data collection which provided rich views of explanation as social practice.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.aston.ac.uk/lss/news/events/baal-annual-meeting/
 
Description AHRC Translating Cultures 2-day Workshop, Glasgow (Angela Creese, PI) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Two-day Workshop on Language Learning and Ethnographic Fieldwork. University of Glasgow, 11-12 April 2016

This two-day workshop aims to provide an opportunity for researchers at all career stages to discuss a wide range of issues relating to language learning and ethnographic fieldwork.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://translatingcultures.org.uk/call-for-papers-two-day-workshop-on-language-learning-and-ethnogra...
 
Description Arts-based research; research-based arts (James Simpson, CI, University of Leeds) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Blog regarding James Simpson's (CI, University of Leeds) sabbatical to Jyväskylä University, Finland
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://tlangblog.wordpress.com/2016/11/08/arts-based-research-research-based-arts/
 
Description Blog post: One bright morning in the middle of the night: A postcard from Finland (James Simpson, CI Leeds) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact In 2016 James Simpson received an invitation to spend three months as an academic visitor at the Centre for Applied Language Studies, University of Jyväskylä to develop its research profile and that of TLANG.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://tlangblog.wordpress.com/2016/08/08/one-bright-morning-in-the-middle-of-the-night-a-postcard-...
 
Description Blog post:Communication in the superdiverse city: a network event (27/5/2016) Jessica Bradley & Emilee Moore 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact On Friday 13th May 2016 we held the first of two networking assemblies organised by the project at Thinktank Birmingham where we were kindly hostly by our partners Birmingham Museums Trust. Networking assemblies are not simply an opportunity for us to disseminate our research so far.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://tlangblog.wordpress.com/2016/05/27/communication-in-the-superdiverse-city-a-network-event-2/
 
Description Co-organiser of seminar: Language research, performance and creative arts, Language Teacher Education Researcher Network at the University of Manchester (Jessica Bradley, Project Doctoral Researcher) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact Seminar on "Why street performance? Linguistic ethnography in multilingual community arts". Jessica Bradley, University of Leeds
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://lantern.humanities.manchester.ac.uk/?p=8444
 
Description Colloquium convened at Sociolinguistics Symposium 20, 2015, University of Jyväskylä, Finland (James Simpson, Project CI) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact 'Adult Language Education and Migration: Challenging Agendas in Policy and Practice'
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://www.jyu.fi/en/congress/ss20
 
Description Department of Applied Linguistics & Communication, Birkbeck, University of London, Translanguaging Business. The 50th Anniversary Conference (Zhu Hua, Li Wei & Agnieszka Lyons, team members) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact 50th Conference: Translanguaging Business
Prof Zhu Hua, Prof Li Wei and Dr Agnieszka Lyons
Written by PhD Student Chieri Noda
Translanguaging in a family-run Polish shop in London

Through a multi-layered examination of the language, business and cultural practices in a small Polish shop run by a multilingual migrant family in Newham, London, Prof Zhu Hua, Prof Li Wei, and Dr Agnieszka Lyons gave life to the definition of translanguaging.

The dynamic process whereby multilingual language users mediate complex social and cognitive activities through strategic employment of multiple semiotic resources to act, to know and to be. (Garcia and Li Wei, 2014)

"The project aims to shed light on the multilingual and multicultural practices in business, community sports, arts and heritage, and socio-legal practices in these cities."
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.bbk.ac.uk/linguistics/news/50th-anniversary-translanguaging-business
 
Description Downscaling Culture, Cardiff University, Frances Rock (Project CI) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact 'Tracing the 'trans' in translation and translanguaging in a superdiverse community: First steps'
Downscaling Culture (Cardiff University)
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014,2015
 
Description E-Seminar: Superdiversity, translanguaging, and ESOL, led by James Simpson (CI, Leeds) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact .
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://tlangeseminar2017.wordpress.com/
 
Description E-seminar led by James Simpson (CI) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The TLang 2017 e-seminar ran on the ESOL-Research email forum from 23 January to 10 February 2017. The topic was 'Translanguaging, superdiversity and ESOL'.

The e-seminar took as a point of departure materials and two questions for discussion that were posted on a website (password TLANG): https://tlangeseminar2017.wordpress.com

The materials comprised video, audio transcript and fieldnote data from the TLang project as it took place in Leeds. They were prepared by James Simpson, Jessica Bradley and Emilee Moore.

The seminar was publicised on BAALmail, the Linguistic Ethnography Forum list, and the LESLLA email list.

The timetable for the seminar was as follows:
23 January: materials for seminar distributed to ESOL-Research members.
30 January: Discussant response to materials distributed to ESOL-Research members, co-written by ESOL practitioners and researchers Dermot Bryers (English for Action, London), Melanie Cooke (King's College London) and Becky Winstanley (Tower Hamlets College, London).
31 January: seminar open to ESOL-Research members for contributions to discussion by email.
10 February: seminar closes.

There were 37 messages in total during the course of the seminar. A summary of themes follows.

ESOL-Research welcomed 99 new subscribers between the first announcement of the seminar and its close.

The website with the materials was viewed 1665 times between January and March 2017 by 398 unique visitors from a globally-spread audience. The top ten countries where the audience resided were: UK (1040 views); US (116); Japan (72); Italy (57); Canada (48); Australia (43); Germany (39); Finland (39); Belgium (19) and Greece (17).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://tlangblog.wordpress.com/2017/01/23/tlang-and-esol-research-e-seminar-2017/
 
Description EDUCATION AND MIGRATION: LANGUAGE FOREGROUNDED, Durham Conference (October 2016) (Tlang team members) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact EDUCATION AND MIGRATION: LANGUAGE FOREGROUNDED

School of Education, Durham University, Durham, United Kingdom

October 2016

The purpose of this international conference is to bring together researchers and educators who are researching and working in educational contexts where human beings, and their language(s), are under pain and pressure.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://researching-multilingually-at-borders.com/?page_id=569
 
Description Educational Engagement - Lang-scape Investigators 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact 30 language teachers from various countries around the world took part in a talk/workshop to develop ideas around an educational engagement project entitled 'lang-scape investigators' in which we are developing materials for use in primary schools around the linguistic landscape and teh geography/literacy/visual arts curriculum.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description International Association of Forensic Linguistics 12th Biennial Conference (Guangzhou, China) (Frances Rock, Project CI) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact 'Applying linguistic research in legal settings' Invited workshop as part of pre-conference event: International Association of Forensic Linguistics 12th Biennial Conference (Guangzhou, China)
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.iafl.org/conffullposts.php?id=118
 
Description Invited Speaker, John Callaghan (Project research fellow), 8th Linguistic Landscapes International Workshop, University of Liverpool 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Invited speaker, 8th Linguistic Landscapes International Workshop, University of Liverpool, Wednesday 27 -- Friday 29 April 2016. On behalf of University of Leeds/AHRC 'Translating Cultures'. Title: "Fit for Purpose or Playing Fast and Loose with LLS"
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://www.liverpool.ac.uk/modern-languages-and-cultures/ll8/
 
Description Invited guest lecture, 'I can't spell "tidying", suddenly': Displaying trajectories in police-witness interviews' (Aston University) Frances Rock (Project CI) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact Abstract: This paper asks what an examination of the complex literacy event through which witness statements are produced in England and Wales can tell us about text trajectories. Witness interviews are tiny but influential segments of long trajectories from crimes to legal outcomes which echo throughout criminal law. Witness interviews archetypally consist of a trajectory from the witness of the crime, through a police officer and onto a written page. This paper examines how this ostensibly inevitable trajectory operates in practice. It identifies a distinctive way of traversing the trajectory through which the inner workings of the trajectory itself are put on display by the interviewing officer and through this display come to recursively influence the trajectory's onward travel. This display of the trajectory draws on four discursive means which I label, collectively, "frontstage entextualisation". I show that by recruiting frontstage entextualisation, the writing process comes to be used as a resource for both producing text and involving the witness in text production. The paper identifies three forms of activity which are accomplished through this recruitment: First, writing together through drafting aloud; secondly, tackling authorial challenges through written-ness and finally, facilitating participation though the artefactuality of writing.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Invited panel member IALIC Conference 2016 (James Simpson Project CI) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Panel presentation at IaLIC Conference, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, November 2016

"A heritage for the future:Remaking heritage in superdiverse Leeds".
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://ialic2016bcn.com/
 
Description Invited panel: EDUCATION AND MIGRATION: LANGUAGE FOREGROUNDED, Durham Conference (October 2016) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Researching Multilingually at Borders Project, Durham Conference (October 2016). Angela Creese was invited to lead panel at which several members of the Tlang project were invited to speak.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://researching-multilingually-at-borders.com/?page_id=945
 
Description Invited presentation, Committee for Foreign Language Assistants in West Yorkshire, univeristy of Leeds (Jessica Bradley & Emilee Moore, team members) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact Presentation title: 'Exploring the multilingual landscapes of schools and their communities: Lang-scape investigators'
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Invited presentation, Language education academic away day, Leeds (Jessica Bradley, project Doctoral Researcher) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Invited presentation, Language education academic away day, Leeds (Jessica Bradley, project Doctoral Researcher). January 2017

"Research impact and strategic engagement: Examples from the TLANG Project."
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.education.leeds.ac.uk/research/language-education/
 
Description Invited research seminar, Jessica Bradley (Project Doctoral Researcher), University of Jyväskylä 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Invited research seminar:

Beyond Language: Co-production and collaboration in language research

Research and practice seminar, University of Jyväskylä, December 7, 2016

Jessica Bradley, TLANG Project, School of Education, University of Leeds
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://translatingcultures.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/Beyond-language_seminar-Finland_0712201...
 
Description Invited research seminar, Lancaster Literacy Research Centre (Jessica Bradley, project Doctoral Researcher) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Invited research seminar at Lancaster Literacy Centre (2016)

"Co-production as transcreation? Mediating ecologies in visual arts and language research".
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.lancaster.ac.uk/arts-and-social-sciences/research/research-centres/lancaster-literacy-res...
 
Description Invited research seminar, University of East Anglia (Jessica Bradley, project doctoral researcher) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Jessica Bradley (University of Leeds) Invited research seminar - "Liquid Methodologies: using a linguistic ehtnographic approach to study multilingual phenomena" Seminar Series, University of East Anglia (October 2016)
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Invited seminar presentation at Northumbria University Linguistics Research Seminar series, Dr James Simpson (Project CI) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The talk engaged with a number of practitioners in the field of applied linguistics and extended conversation around the theme of language learning and migration.

'Challenging agendas: Language learning for adult migrants in the UK.'
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/about-us/academic-departments/humanities/research/english-research/eng...
 
Description Invited seminar, University of Jyväskylä, Finland, September 2016 (James Simpson Project CI) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Research seminar: Translation and Translanguaging (James Simpson, University of Leeds) University of Jyväskylä Language Campus, Finland - September 2016.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://www.jyu.fi/en/news/archive/2016/08/tapahtuma-2016-08-11-14-47-03-137187
 
Description Invited speaker (Li Wei, project CI) Goldsmiths, University of London 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Invited speaker at research seminar Goldsmith's, University of London, March 2016 " Post multilingualism, translanguaging and linguistic creativity, March 2016
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Invited speaker Dept of English Language and Linguistics, Lancaster University - Mike Baynham (Project CI) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact December 7th 2016 Dept of English Language and Linguistics, Lancaster University. A talk entitled: "Translanguaging? Code-switching? Same difference? Presenter Mike Baynham
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Invited speaker Graduate School of Education, University of Bristol, Dr James Simpson (Project CI) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact The talk engaged with a number of practitioners in the field of applied linguistics and extended conversation around the theme of language learning and migration.

'Language learning for adult migrants in the UK.'
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.bristol.ac.uk/education/
 
Description Invited speaker SHOWCASE 2015 - The 6th annual University of Leeds Postgraduate Research Conference (Jessica Bradley, Project SR) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact 'Showcase' is the University of Leeds annual showcase and celebration of excellence in postgraduate research and the contribution made by the postgraduate research community to the research of the University.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.pgrconference.leeds.ac.uk/
 
Description Invited speaker Translation, Translanguaging and Creativity Workshop. Institute of Modern Languages Research, London (Mike Baynham (Project CI) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact June 13th 2016 Translation, Translanguaging and Creativity Workshop. Institute of Modern Languages Research, London University. A talk: Fieldwork Conversations: a conversation with Bruno. Presenters: Mike Baynham and Bruno Duque
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Invited speaker at Sociolinguistics Symposium 21, June 2016 (James Simpson, CI & Jessica Bradley, Research Fellow) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Invited speakers at Sociolinguistics Symposium 2016, Universidad de Murcia, Spain, June 2016.

"Translanguaging in the contact zone: Language use in superdiverse urban LEeds">
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.um.es/web/sociolinguistics-symposium21/
 
Description Invited speaker, Committee for Foreign Language Assistants, West Yorks. (Jessica Bradley with Emillee Moore, TLANG members, University of Leeds) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Bradley, J. (2016) (With Emilee Moore) Invited speaker: 'Exploring the multilingual landscapes of schools and their communities: Lang-scape Investigators' Committee for Foreign Language Assistants West Yorkshire seminar series, University of Leeds (January 2016).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://www.leeds.ac.uk/arts/info/20043/school_of_languages_cultures_and_societies/965/about/2
 
Description Invited speaker, IMLR seminar, Senate House, London (Jessica Bradley, project doctoral researcher) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Bradley, J. (2016) Invited speaker: 'Translanguaging from studio to street: resemiotizing the narrative in production and performance'. Translation, Translanguaging and Creativity, AHRC Translating Cultures and IMLR seminar, Senate House, London (June 2016).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://translating.hypotheses.org/685
 
Description Invited speaker, The Media of Diaspora Research Group (MDRG), University of Lincoln (Mike Baynham, Project CI) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact School of English and Journalism at the University of Lincoln hosting a workshop titled 'The effects of post-Brexit on European diaspora journalists' on Wednesday 30 November 2016.

Professor Mike Baynham, invited speaker "Dark intersectionality": the rise of racist/xenophobic and homophobic hate crime post BREXIT and Trump"
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://mediaofdiaspora.blogs.lincoln.ac.uk/2016/09/22/workshop-the-effects-of-post-brexit-on-europea...
 
Description Invited speaker, University of Southampton, (Li Wei, Project CI) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Invited speaker at research seminar University of Southampton, March 2016 " Post multilingualism, translanguaging and linguistic creativity
March 2016
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Invited speakers AHRC TLANG Network Assembly, May 2016 (Adrian Blackledge & James Simpson, Project CIs) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Invited speaker at TLANG Network Assembly, 13 May 2016. James Simpson & Adrian Blackledge

" Encounters with everyday Heritage".
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://translatingcultures.org.uk/event/a-network-assembly-communication-in-the-superdiverse-city/
 
Description Invited talk by Caroline Tagg at University of Southampton 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Invited talk by Caroline Tagg at University of Southampton (December 2016) "Communicating across online and offline contexts: a mobile-enabled business model for migrant micro-entrepreneurs"
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Invited talk by Caroline Tagg at the University of Birmingham 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact "Discourse analysis of researcher vignettes: a reflexive approach to exploring co-production in a large diverse team". Invited talk at the University of Birmingham
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Keynote speaker, Sociolinguistics Symposium 21, Universidad de Murcia (Mike Baynham, Project CI) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Keynote speaker at Sociolinguistics Symposium 21, Universidad de Murcia (June 2016)

"Marginal sexualities in multilingual Singapore: queer translanguaging in the plays of Alfian Saat. Sociolinguistics Symposium, Murcia,Mike Baynham and Tong King Lee (University of Hong Kong)"
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.um.es/web/sociolinguistics-symposium21/content/conference-programme
 
Description LangScape Curators, Leeds (James Simpson CI & Jesscia Bradley, doctoral researcher TLANG) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Researchers from the TLANG project and FAHACS will be in Beeston over the February half term holiday to continue the 'LangScape Curators' programme. This work is supported by the Educational Engagement Social Sciences Cluster.

Over the course of the three-day programme, young people from the IntoUniversity Leeds South centre in Beeston will be learning how to be ethnographic researchers and conducting their own explorations of the local area, using film and interviews. They will then work with artists and creative practitioners to analyse and present their findings. The programme ends with a celebration and open exhibition event at the centre.



You can see the work that the participants from the Leeds East centre produced on our project tumblr: www.langscapecurators.tumblr.com. The team will be keeping the tumblr updated over the course of next week with the new discoveries and findings.

LangScape Curators is research- and practice-led educational and public engagement, leading from methodologies and findings from the TLANG project and from creative practice.

For more information about this programme please contact Jessica Bradley, TLANG project, School of Education: j.m.bradley@leeds.ac.uk .

More information about IntoUniversity and their work can be found here: http://intouniversity.org.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.education.leeds.ac.uk/news/2017/langscape-curators-in-beeston-south-leeds
 
Description Launch seminar for Golding Series, University of London (Goldsmiths) 2015 (Zhu Hua, Project CI) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact Launch Seminar, Golding Series, University of London (Godsmiths): Translanguaging practices among multilingual speakers
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.gold.ac.uk/calendar/?id=8383
 
Description Open discussion at Bloomsbury Festival 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Open discussion as part of the Bloomsbury Festival in London (October 2016) reflecting on language-related issues hosted by members of the Tlang team
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://bloomsburyfestival.org.uk/
 
Description Panelist at Transnationalizing Modern Languages: Reshaping the Discipline for the 21st Century (Professor Li Wei, Project CI) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact The talk engaged in theoretical conversations about superdiversity/translanguaging and presented innovative ideas for new methodologies to research in changing city landscapes.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.transnationalmodernlanguages.ac.uk/2015/12/15/transnationalizing-modern-languages-reshapi...
 
Description Plenary Speaker at Sociolinguistics Summer School, Dublin 2015 (Professor Li Wei, Project CI) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact This talk engaged with a number of practitioners in the field of multilingualism and translanguaging and extended the conversation around the theme of linguistic creativity.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://sss6dublin.files.wordpress.com/2015/07/sss6-final-programme-pdf1.pdf
 
Description Presentation (team member) Applied Linguistics Seminar Series, Newcastle University (Zhu Hua, Project CI) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact ABSTRACT:The nature of diaspora is changing in the 21st century. Yet many of the communication issues remain the same. At the heart of it is multilingual and intercultural communication across time and space. This talk discusses some of the core issues of communication between the diaspora and the homeland, the past and the present, the individual and the community, and the sense of belonging and the ascribed category with a detailed analysis of empirical data collected through linguistic ethnography in the Chinese diaspora in Britain and elsewhere. It also highlights the significance of dynamic multilingualism in everyday communication.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.ncl.ac.uk/ecls/news/item/diaspora-multilingual-and-intercultural-communication-across-tim...
 
Description Presentation Translating Cultures/Cultural Encounters Workshop, Senate house, University of London 2015 (Angela Creese, PI) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact Shared initial findings of phase one of the project.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Presentation at BAAL Annual Meeting 2015 (Piotr Wegorowski, Project Doctoral Researcher) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact Presentation title: Special interpretative framing: Negotiating expertise in translation zones
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.aston.ac.uk/lss/news/events/baal-annual-meeting/
 
Description Presentation at International Association of Forensic Linguistics 12th Biennial Conference (Guangzhou, China) Frances Rock (Project CI) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact 'Understanding understanding? A first look at some fuzzy understandings of law' International Association of Forensic Linguistics 12th Biennial Conference (Guangzhou, China)
Abstract: Scholars of legal language frequently raise concerns about the 'difficulty' of language which is presented to the public. The two audience dilemma identifies two constituent groups who might use legal texts, legal specialists and lay people, and notes that each has different needs and different levels of experience and expertise (e.g. Heffer 2008:52). It seems self-evident that legal specialists will know more about legal terms than lay people. However binary categorisations on the basis of expertise can oversimplify, despite their usefulness (e.g. Sarangi 2001). This paper suggests that we need to continue to look closely at the contribution of lay people to their own understanding of legal settings. In my previous work, I have examined the knowledge that lay people claim in legal settings and the ways in which they bring that knowledge to bear in legal encounters using approaches grounded in linguistic ethnography and social practices approaches to text. However, in this paper I address the background knowledge that lay people claim, about the law, when they are outside law's immediate environs.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Presentation at The future for community languages: ideas forum, hosted by the British Academy and supported by the National Resource Centre for Supplementary Education and Speak to the Future, the Campaign for Languages 2015 (Angela Creese, PI) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact This talk engaged with a number of practitioners in the field of languages and Education and extended conversation around this theme.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.supplementaryeducation.org.uk/event/the-future-for-community-languages-ideas-forum/
 
Description Presentation at White Rose DTC conference, University of Sheffield (Jessica Bradley, Project Doctoral Researcher) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact Presentation title: 'Can I sit next to you? Partnership working in applied lingustics'
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://wrdtc.ac.uk/
 
Description Presentation at the Centre for Language Education Research (CLER) in the School of Education at the University of Leeds (Jessica Bradley, Project Doctoral Researcher) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact Language Research, Performance and Creative Arts
By Jessica Bradley, TLANG Doctoral Researcher, University of Leeds

On 16th October 2015 the Centre for Language Education Research (CLER) in the School of Education at the University of Leeds hosted a day-long seminar which focused on current research which crosses over from language to arts and vice versa. The event was co-organised with Lou Harvey, lecturer in TESOL, in conjunction with two of the AHRC's Translating Cultures projects: Researching Multilingually at the Borders of Language, the Body, Law and the State (RM) and Translation and Translanguaging: Investigating Linguistic and Culture Transformations in Superdiverse Wards in Four UK Cities (TLANG). TLANG co-investigator James Simpson kindly agreed to act as discussant.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://tlangblog.wordpress.com/2015/10/27/language-research-performance-and-creative-arts/
 
Description Presentation given at The Ethics of Online Research Methods, Research Network for Linguistics in Cardiff (LinC) (Tagg, C., A. Hallak, R. Hu, A. Lyons and Rock, F., team members) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact The talk engaged in theoretical conversations about superdiversity/translanguaging and presented innovative ideas for new methodologies to research in changing city landscapes.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://blogs.cardiff.ac.uk/linc/ethics-of-online-research-methods-cfp/
 
Description Presentation given at The Multilingual University Seminar Series, University of Birmingham 2015 (Caroline Tagg & Rachel Hu, team members) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact Translating cultures large grant team 3
Bilingual researchers as intermediaries of translation in a research team

(Translation and translanguaging: Investigating linguistic and cultural transformations in superdiverse wards in four UK cities)

Trying to capture the experience of fieldwork within Birmingham's bustling indoor market, Adrian Blackledge writes in a research vignette, 'This is Mandarin. I cannot understand. Rachel transcribes. I can understand. Teamwork works'. The comment captures the importance of bilingual researchers like Rachel for research teams working in multilingual contexts, and yet (in deliberately foregrounding the immediate relief of being able to understand) downplays the complexities of the translator's role. What does it mean to 'transcribe' and to translate? What does it mean to 'understand'? How is understanding negotiated, performed and contested through the process of translation within a large team project?
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://multilingualuniversity.wordpress.com/seminar-4/
 
Description Presentation of conference paper at the University of Aston (Jessica Bradley, Project Doctoral Researcher) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact Conference paper title "Researching performance and performing research "
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Presentation to AAAL conference 2015, Toronto (Professor Li Wei, Project CI) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact The talk engaged in theoretical conversations about superdiversity/translanguaging and presented innovative ideas for new methodologies to research in changing city landscapes.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.aaal.org/?page=History
 
Description Presentation to Centre for Globalisation, Education & Social Futures (GESF), Graduate School of Education, University of Bristol (Angela Creese (PI) & Adrian Blackledge CI) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact ABSTRACT: Communicative repertoires in the city

Professor Adrian Blackledge & Professor Angela Creese

Mosaic Centre for Research on Multilingualism, University of Birmingham, United Kingdom.

The UK is in the midst of an era of demographic shift, driven by globalisation and changing patterns of migration. Many UK cities are now characterised by 'superdiversity', in which not only 'ethnicity', but other variables (e.g. legal status, immigration history, educational background, socio-economic status) influence the composition and trajectories of urban centres. Our research investigates how people communicate in these changing conditions.

We investigate the 'spatial repertoires' (Pennycook and Otsuji, 2015) of the Birmingham Bull Ring Indoor Market and the Library of Birmingham (LOB), and describe the discourses particular to these environments. Taking as our main focus a butcher's stall in the Birmingham markets run by a husband and wife team from Fujian and Malaysia respectively, and a public experience assistance in the LOB with origins in Hong Kong, we consider how interaction occurs within 'contact zones' (Pratt 1991), or 'translation zones' (Apter 2006). Our interest is in the everyday communicative practices of contemporary life in two of the city's best-known meeting places. We investigate how social relationships are kept in good repair (Goffman, 1981) as market traders and their customers, and library staff and visitors negotiate, mime, point, tease, compliment, joke, laugh, haggle, inform, misunderstand, complain, argue, and so on. The market and the library are spaces characterized by communal relations where social contact becomes habitual and frequent. In our analysis of such contact we generate theory out of signs in use and action in superdiverse urban environments.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.bristol.ac.uk/education/events/2015/gesf---multilingualism-seminar-series-1811.html
 
Description Presentation, Critical Cultural Translation: Practice more than theory workshop 2015, Queen Margaret University, Edinburgh (Angela Creese, PI) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact Seminar on "Translanguaging as practice and pedagogy"
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.transnationalmodernlanguages.ac.uk/files/2015/05/SFCritical-Cultural-Translation-programm...
 
Description Presentation: Applied Linguistics Seminar Series, University of Manchester (Zhu Hua, Project CI) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact The Centre for Translation and Intercultural Studies (CTIS) of the University of Manchester invites you all to a seminar by Dr. Zhu Hua which will take place on February 5th 2015 at 2 p.m. in the Kilburn Building, Theatre 1.5. In the seminar she will examine the translanguaging practices among multilingual speakers using the linguistic ethnographic data from two AHRC-funded projects on Chinese and Polish communities. She will highlight the significance of dynamic and flexible multilingualism in everyday communication, multilingual speakers' awareness of the social, cultural and interactional roles and status of different languages in their repertories as well as their multilingual creativity in their communicative practices.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://intercultural.humanities.manchester.ac.uk/?p=1290
 
Description Refereed conference paper, TESOL Convention, USA (Jessica Bradley with Mike Baynham Project CI) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Bradley, J. (2016) (with Mike Baynham, presented by Baynham) Refereed conference paper: 'Researching Marginalised Groups: ethical issues as a potential gatekeeping strategy'. TESOL Convention, Baltimore, USA (April 2016).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.tesol.org/convention2016
 
Description Referred conference paper Society for Artistic Research, the Netherlands (Jessica Bradley, project doctoral researcher) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Bradley, J. (2016) (with Louise Atkinson) Refereed conference paper: 'Writing as Practice, Practice as Writing: Conversations between Art, Linguistics and Ethnography in Digital Space'. Society for Artistic Research, The Hague, The Netherlands (April 2016).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.sarconference2016.net/rc/index.html
 
Description Referred conference paper, LLII Conference, Sheffield (Jessica Bradley (Project doctoral researcher) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Bradley, J. (2016) Refereed conference paper: 'Ethical entanglements: collaboration and co-production in language/arts research/practice'. Language, Literacy and Identity International Conference, Sheffield, UK. (July 2016).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://www.sheffield.ac.uk/education/research/csnl/2.17411
 
Description Researching Multilingually at Borders, Webinar (Angela Creese, PI) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact IUG and RM Borders Online Seminar Series 2015/16
"Crossing borders of foreign language education and translation in Palestine"

18 April 2016: "What is collaborative multilingual research? Reflections on "ways of working"
Presenters: Robert Gibb & Julien D Iglesias (University of Glasgow) - Case Study 3
Angela Creese & 'Translating Cultures' discussants
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://researching-multilingually-at-borders.com/?page_id=1375
 
Description Roma dance performance 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Tlang team sponsored a dance perfomance by the Roma Community involved in the Tlang research project, Bloomsbury Festival (October 2016)
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://bloomsburyfestival.org.uk/
 
Description Seminar on Researching and Teaching Translingual Practice, Suresh Canagarajah is Edwin Erle Sparks Professor of Applied Linguistics and Director of the Migration Studies Project at Pennsylvania State University. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact Researching and Teaching Translingual Practice

8 September 2014

Seminar in the School of Education, University of Birmingham.

Suresh Canagarajah is Edwin Erle Sparks Professor of Applied Linguistics and Director of the Migration Studies Project at Pennsylvania State University. He has published six books, 39 papers in peer-reviewed journals, and 40 chapters in edited volumes. He is invited editor of the forthcoming Routledge Handbook of Migration and Language
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/generic/tlang/events/previous-events.aspx
 
Description Seminar with Dr Heidi Byrnes, Distinguished Professor of German at Georgetown University 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact Teaching foreign languages at the university level in the age of globalization: Reflections - refractions - reconsiderations

2 September 2014

This seminar with Dr Heidi Byrnes, Distinguished Professor of German at Georgetown University took place in the School of Education, University of Birmingham.

In her presentation she explored how the teaching and learning of foreign languages, as contrasted with second languages, especially English as a second language in many parts of the world, is being challenged by phenomena that we associate with the age of globalization, multilingualism, and multiculturalism.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/generic/tlang/events/previous-events.aspx
 
Description Seminar: From multilingualism to superdiversity in corpus linguistics: implications for research, Dr Rachelle Vessey from the University of Newcastle 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact From multilingualism to superdiversity in corpus linguistics: implications for research

30th June 2015

Dr Rachelle Vessey from the University of Newcastle was the speaker at this seminar which was held at the University of Birmingham

This seminar is part of a short series of seminars entitled Language and Diversity: exploring corpus approaches.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/generic/tlang/events/previous-events.aspx
 
Description Seminar: Mosaic - re-imagining the monolingual classroom through theatre-in-education, Deborah Pakkar-Hull 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact Mosaic - re-imagining the monolingual classroom through theatre-in-education

27 February 2015

In this talk at the University of Birmingham, Deborah Pakkar-Hull explored the development of Mosaic- a piece of multilingual participatory theatre for 5 - 8 year olds that toured to schools in 2011. The piece was created by Theatre in Education Company The Play House, and was designed to promote linguistically diverse practices in Birmingham primary schools.

Presented from a practitioner perspective and based on data collected during the touring of Mosaic; primarily audio recordings made of the interactions of six participating pupils - the talk focuses on three significant moments from the performance, examining how participatory theatre pedagogies were successfully employed to promote multilingualism and to begin to challenge a culture of monolingual teaching and learning.

The talk also explored the idea that the participatory approaches adopted in Mosaic,not only mounted a modest challenge to dominant monolingual norms, but also enabled children to explore and perform new social identities in relation to their multilingual resources.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/generic/tlang/events/previous-events.aspx
 
Description Seminar: Scalar Approaches to Language, Time and Space: Further Directions, Peter De Costa from Michigan State University 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact Scalar Approaches to Language, Time and Space: Further Directions

23 April 2015

With speaker Peter De Costa from Michigan State University

Macro-micro models in sociolinguistics have come under criticism recently (e.g., Collins & Slembrouck, 2009) because they offer only a partial understanding of how language resources are mobilized in language practices. Common among these criticisms is the need to move beyond the rather dichotomous reasoning that local language practices are constrained by broader processes and that, conversely, these practices sometimes change global processes. This criticism has generated efforts (e.g., Blommaert & Dong, 2010; Canagarajah, 2013; Collins, 2012; Collins, Wortham & Rhodes, 2012) to better understand the complex temporal and spatial dimensions that underlie language use. In light of the growing interest in scalar-based models, this presentation examined the use of scales to investigate complex, dynamic, on-the-ground realities of language use in a variety of contact zones. The presentation, at the University of Birmingham, aimed to take scalar analysis in new directions, recommending useful social and educational implications, and generating new questions for further investigation.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/generic/tlang/events/previous-events.aspx
 
Description Seminar: The superdiversification of Global English, Professor Christian Mair from Universität Freiburg 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact From Nigeria and the Bahamas but ... currently living in Belgium: The superdiversification of Global English

18th June 2015

Professor Christian Mair from Universität Freiburg was the speaker at this seminar which was held at the University of Birmingham

This seminar is part of a short series of seminars entitled Language and Diversity: exploring corpus approaches.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/generic/tlang/events/previous-events.aspx
 
Description Stockholm University. Centre for Research on Bilingualism, Adrian Blackledge (Project CI) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact Abstract

This paper presents emergent outcomes of a study which investigates how people communicate when they bring different histories, biographies, and trajectories to interaction in contexts of superdiversity. The study is a linguistic ethnography of city neighbourhoods, focusing on a small number of key participants. Taking Goffman as a starting point for analysis the presentation considers how interactions in 'the slop of social life' serve to connect and disconnect people. Analysis relates to conditions of migration, multilingualism and multiculturalism in contemporary cities.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.biling.su.se/english/
 
Description Structure et Dynamique des Langues (le CNRS, l'INALCO, Paris), Adrian Blackledge (Project CI) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact Language and Superdiversity in Two City Meeting-Places
This paper presents emergent outcomes of a study which investigates how people communicate when they bring different histories, biographies, and trajectories to interaction in contexts of superdiversity. The study is a linguistic ethnography of city neighbourhoods, focusing on a small number of key participants. Taking Goffman as a starting point for analysis the presentation considers how interactions in 'the slop of social life' serve to connect and disconnect people. Analysis relates to conditions of migration, multilingualism and multiculturalism in contemporary cities.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.vjf.cnrs.fr/sedyl/recherches.php?langue=fr&type=seminaires&programme=pratiques&no_axe=2
 
Description TESOL International Convention 2015, invited panel member (Dr James Simpson (Project CI) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact As the largest organization focused exclusively on English language teaching for speakers of other languages, TESOL annually hosts more than 6,500 people from across the United States and around the world at the international convention. Educators at all levels attend to find a productive exchange of ideas and information and to feel the embrace of a dynamic professional community.

International ideas and innovations intersect with Canadian culture in Toronto, one of the world's most cosmopolitan cities. Speaking 140 different languages, more than half of Toronto's residents were born outside of Canada. The ongoing fusion of cultures continues to enrich Toronto, which local actress Lisa Ray calls, "the most successful social experiment in the world."
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.tesol.org/convention2015/
 
Description TLANG Blog and Twitter accounts 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact In the past 12 months the TLANG team have posted 69 Blog articles on the website with 790 views from UK, Poland, USA, Finland, Spain, Greece. With 476 followers on Twitter.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://tlangblog.wordpress.com/
 
Description TLANG at Connected Communities Utopias Festival 2016 (Jess Bradley, Leeds University) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Taking inspiration from the 500th anniversary of the publication in 1516 in Latin of Thomas More's Utopia, the 2016 Connected Communities Research Festival has the theme of Community Futures and Utopias. From March to June 2016 the Festival is supporting activities across the UK bringing together researchers and communities to creatively explore diverse perspectives on community futures and what 'utopia' means for communities in the 21st Century
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://tlangblog.wordpress.com/2016/04/21/tlang-at-connected-communities-utopias-festival-2016/
 
Description The XXXIII Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research Conference Biennial Meeting, (Auckland, New Zealand) [Invited paper] Frances Rock (Project CI) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact 'Managing Southern Ocean fisheries to protect other ecosystem services' with Simeon Hill, Rachel Cavanagh, Susie Grant, Jose Xavier, Eugene Murphy, Phil Trathan (Presented by Simeon Hill of the British Antarctic Survey)
The XXXIII Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research Conference Biennial Meeting, (Auckland, New Zealand) [Invited paper]
Abstract: The crustaceans and finfish of the Southern Ocean are a globally significant resource and fishing is one of few direct income-generating activities that take place in the Antarctic. The Convention on the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources requires decision makers to ensure that fisheries do not compromise ecological relationships or cause irreversible damage to the ecosystem. These requirements effectively mandate the protection of other ecosystem services (i.e. the benefits that mankind obtains from Antarctic ecosystems). These services include the tangible climate regulating role of the healthy, functioning ecosystem and its less tangible but still important "intrinsic value". The fisheries management strategies that are necessary to meet the Convention's requirements must be based on high quality scientific evidence, but they also require information about how people benefit from ecosystem services. The debate over the Antarctic krill fishery illustrates the different ways that people perceive these benefits: Some claim that the fishery is a model of ecosystem-based management which balances the needs of the fishery against those of krill predators while others claim that it exemplifies unsustainable fishing. We explore the perceptions of ecosystem services that underpin these opinions, and the associated aspirations for the future state of the ecosystem. We focus on four sectors with an interest in the krill fishery: the fishing industry, conservation organisations, scientists and the media. Despite the apparent polarity, all sectors share an interest in improving the management of the fishery. Their specific ideas provide information which scientists and fishery managers can use to identify the ecosystem states and management objectives that are relevant to the ecosystem services that people value. Antarctic ecosystems are under pressure from climate change and growing global consumption but the management objectives for these ecosystems remain poorly defined. We suggest that the identification of appropriate objectives is now a priority which requires unprecedented cooperation between decision makers, scientists, and beneficiaries.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.scar.org/scarmeetings/conferences
 
Description Tlang Project Blog 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact AHRC funded Tlang project blog, which is regularly updated and disseminated to a wide academic and non-academic audience, raising awareness of and promoting the research both nationally and internationally. It also provides a platform for important debates. We launched the blog in 2014 and our 'views' have grown from 524 in 2014 to 2267 in 2015. We have visitors from 21 countries.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014,2015,2016
URL https://tlangblog.wordpress.com/
 
Description Tlang Project E-seminar series 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The title of the seminar was: Metrolingualism, Translation, Translanguaging

The e-seminar set out to engage an international collection of different participants including students, professional practitioners (teachers, educators, lecturers) and researchers in themes emerging from the project including 'commonplace diversity', 'conviviality' and cosmopolitanism.
The e-seminar recruited 83 new members or 11% of the total membership The group Linguistic Ethnography Forum reported it as a 'major recruiting tool, with wide interest'.
The starting point for discussion was the first chapter of a book 'Metrolingualism: Language in the City' by Alastair Pennycook and Emi Otsuji, published by Routledge in 2015. The text, made available courtesy of the publisher, was distributed to all list members on the 13th April. In their chapter, Pennycook and Otsuji introduce the term metrolingualism to describe everyday language practices in relation to urban space. As a result of long ethnographic work in Sydney and Tokyo, they demonstrate the everydayness of multilingual practices in a city. In doing so, Pennycook and Otsuji, focused on workers in a produce market, which corresponds to one of the Tlang project sites - the Birmingham Bullring Indoor Market.

Following the two texts - the book chapter and the response - the e-seminar opened for general discussion on the 20th April. In total, 19 members made their contributions. Participants in discussion were asked not to exceed 1000 words. The contributors came from all over the world, including Australia, North America, Africa, Asia and Europe. The themes addressed by the participants included the issues of transcription, the changing nature of spaces where linguistic practices take place, as well as the question of diversity. Following Creese and Blackledge, a number of people also expressed the view that the focus on the city might be limiting. Others also pointed out the importance of gesture. Another point of discussion was viewing languages as social constructs, which has implications for our understanding of multilingualism. Alastair Pennycook and Emi Otsuji also joined in the discussion at some point, reacting to some of the remarks a number of participants had, especially with regards to making the city the foci of analysis.
After a lively discussion the e-seminar closed on the 1st May. It was a great opportunity for people from around the globe to exchange views on some of the most current research in the area and make some valid contributions. Given the wide audience of the Linguistic Ethnography Forum, the e-seminar managed to create an interest in some of the concepts explored by the Translation and Tralnslanguaging project and gave it a great visibility internationally. The contributions can also be still accessed on the mailing list archive as a great resource.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.lingethnog.org/2015/04/10/2015-e-seminar-metrolingualism-translation-translanguaging-led-...
 
Description Tlang Project Website 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact AHRC funded Translanguaging Project website promoting the research activities and objectives of the project and its team. Visitors have access to all project outputs in the form of working papers, films, poems, digitally recorded presentations of visitors.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014,2015,2016
URL http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/generic/tlang/index.aspx
 
Description Utopias Fair, Somerset House, London (Jessica Bradley TLANG Project doctoral researcher) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Utopias Fair, Somerset House, June 2016 (Bradley, Migration and Home Project)

TLANG stand, Migration and Home art activity and performance, public engagement.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://www.somersethouse.org.uk/whats-on/utopia-2016