EWA - The Ethno-ornithology World Archive

Lead Research Organisation: University of Oxford
Department Name: Zoology

Abstract

Birds inspire people, their cultures and faiths. More than any other wild animals, these vocal, colourful and charismatic creatures fuel human imagination. Myths, stories and religious practices connected to birds are engrained in many cultures, from saluting magpies to relying on vultures in religious burial practices of the Tibetan plateau. At the same time, birds provide essential services to communities and the environment they share with them. Birds may act as pollinators or seed dispersers, but also eat farmland pests, benefiting humans.

The presence and abundance of different kinds of birds can also act as an indicator for the state of the natural environment that they inhabit. Because of their interest to people, there are many more volunteer birdwatchers than their are volunteers to document the fortunes of any other creatures. Through 'Citizen Science' approaches involving thousands of volunteers, we are therefore able to monitor changes in bird distributions and numbers on a national scale in ways that would be inconceivable for other animals or plants. Birds are therefore of great importance to conservation and biodiversity research. The environmental and cultural significance of birds can be integrated together to serve communities and their cultures, aid conservation research, and preserve both cultural and biological diversity.

Many people possess knowledge of birds that is not rooted in scientific, but in cultural understanding of the world around them. This knowledge is largely undocumented, but is no less valid than scientific knowledge. Being able to share that knowledge can bring inspiration to communities in the realisations that their knowledge, and birds, are important. It can be empowering for people who otherwise might not have a voice in the world, to have the value of their local or traditional knowledge recognised and valued by a global community. But opportunities for such recognition are few, and for Traditional and Local Ecological Knowledge (TEK and LEK), do not exist on the Internet. Individual communities already engage with local conservation organisations and get involved in community conservation projects. A means of sharing the local lore and information can be crucial for successful community involvement, and to build local pride in nature projects.

The Internet is recognised as the most powerful means to access a global audience and share information on a global scale. Its potential is constantly growing. Working directly with our Project Partner, Birdlife International, the largest conservation collaborative in the world with partners in 126 countries, and especially its Local Empowerment Programme, the EWA project aims to connect local communities and groups of researchers by creating an open database of cultural knowledge about birds, free to access by individuals, communities and researchers. We will work with communities, as well as local organisations to help preserve the rich cultural diversity present in local stories, myths, or names of birds etc. By encouraging individuals, community leaders or local organisations to submit data such as stories, recordings of songs, or photographs of works of art or cultural artefacts, we will build an archive that will help to bring out the rich cultural and natural heritage inherent in many communities.

By linking cultural and biological information, especially through the web-based Handbook of Birds Alive (Lynx Edicions Project Partner) we will achieve a greater integration between conservationists and local people on-the-ground, including greater understanding of the cultures of all stakeholders, including indigenous communities, and to promote the celebration of the cultural diversity of people living in a close relationship with nature. The project is timely in relation to the project partnership, but it is also urgent because TEK and LEK, which is transmitted orally, tends to be held by ageing people and declines daily.

Planned Impact

The primary objective for the work proposed is to advance understanding of cultural knowledges related to birds, what role they play in community cohesion and involvement with nature, and how to promote the dialogue between science-based and culture-based environmental perceptions through the development of a publicly-accessible internet-based archive of culturally-relevant material related to birds (EWA - the Ethno-ornithology World Archive).

EWA will achieve this through public (individual and community-based) involvement in workshops at key stages in its development, through their guided contribution to the archive, through workshops, seminars etc. held within countries of origination to promote EWA and assist people with access and contribution to the system, through encouraging people locally to think of their own ways to use the EWA system, including originating their own research questions or learning from the Traditional and Local Ecological Knowledges of other communities.

Inherent and implicit to the process of public engagement with EWA is the understanding that a global community (represented by the Internet and global conservation agencies) values the local and traditional knowledge of all people (including those in Western cultures). Engagement of communities in ethno-ornithological research has the capacity to engage them in wider ethno-biological and conservation projects, with future projects benefiting from the interest and engagement created by EWA. Nevertheless, the logistical framework needed for the exchange of data between areas of different focus (e.g. not birds) is not yet developed, and its development is outside the scope of this application.

We identify seven distinct key areas where this research is expected to have impact.

1) the engagement of communities in ethno-ornithology research can help improve their connection with the natural world; either through reconnecting with natural knowledge which has been marginalised in recently industrialised communities, or greater engagement in local conservation initiatives which can bring substantial fulfilment and improvement in the quality of life for people directly affected by conservation management decisions.

2) the improved understanding of how people engage with nature on personal and community levels will help bring greater integration between local communities and the research community. Outreach to conservation science community can help elevate the status of traditional, often verbal knowledge held by individuals and communities and promote its use in engaging local conservation initiatives. Ultimately, both conservationists and local communities will be able to engage in a meaningful dialogue which will, e.g. help resolve human-wildlife conflict.

3) EWA can contribute to peacebuilding by documenting examples such as Leshem in Israel.

4) through the demonstration that Traditional and Local Ecological Knowledge is valued by a global community, represented by the Internet, national and international conservation agencies, researchers and scholars, EWA will give value locally to knowledge of nature and thence to nature itself. This is essential for conservation.

5) there is an urgent need to capture TEK and LEK, which is transmitted orally and typically held by the elderly, before it is lost.

6) environmental impact: the involvement of communities at grass-roots level is essential for the delivery of effective conservation action, and conservation is essential to maintain biodiversity and the functioning ecosystems upon which all life depends.

7) EWA will help the public understanding of science. Through improved communication and encouragement of the scientific community to engage with local communities in a culturally relevant way, conservation scientists can reach out not only to people already interested in science reporting, but also to members of the public who prefer a more culturally-relevant narrative

Publications


10 25 50
 
Title Abbotsbury Swan-catch video on EWA and Youtube 
Description Publically-viewable video of the biennial catch of wild swans at Abbotsbury Swannery in 2015. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact 54 views 
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s3jwB3xhQQg
 
Title EWA Oxford Swifts video on Youtube 
Description Video to feature in Resources page of EWA on the Swifts nesting in the Tower of the Oxford University Museum of Natural History 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact 101 views 
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0H68sLxBLOM
 
Title Hill End 2015 Nature Walk 
Description Publically-viewable video of a nature walk led by EWA Director for Holy Trinity Church, Headington Quarry, Oxford. the video will be viewable on EWA Resources page. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact 52 views. Views do not include those via EWA. 
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AVfdIS30k7s
 
Description The grant funded the development of EWA: the Ethno-ornithology World Archive. This is the world's first interactive archive of culturally-significant knowledge of birds. Apart from engaging the public with birds through both a cultural and ornithological lens, EWA is expected to contribute significantly to the future success of bird conservation, through its aim of making bird conservation culturally and socially intelligible and relevant. Note that development of the EWA software took longer than anticipated, but the site is now in Beta testing alongside development of the Curator Network under a follow-on grant. Note also that further IT development is being funded separately from that follow-on award.
Exploitation Route Diverse means - the full 'findings' of the project will become clear as the archive is populated through ethno-ornithological, conservation and linguistic research, through public engagement and through research developing out of the data held in EWA. While most areas listed below should be self-apparent, the development of new disciplines such as Environmental Peacebuilding founded in ethno-ornithology, give the EWA immense potential in unexpected areas.
Sectors Communities and Social Services/Policy,Creative Economy,Digital/Communication/Information Technologies (including Software),Education,Environment,Healthcare,Leisure Activities, including Sports, Recreation and Tourism,Government, Democracy and Justice,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections,Security and Diplomacy
URL https://www.ewa.ox.ac.uk/demo/app/webroot/
 
Description In 2014 I wrote: Development of the Ethno-ornithology World Archive is under construction at this point, and so full impact will materialise when the archive goes live in 2016. IT developers estimate the whole EWA to be 50% achieved, rising to 75% in the next two weeks of intensive coding now that wire-framing has been completed. Impacts at this point include preparation of the initial user communities, BirdLife Partners etc. who will engage with EWA and a large number of initiatives, both national and international, unilaterally or with project partners for future development and funding of EWA. The sectors listed below are predictive rather than being realised at this point, especially in relation to future steps, but all have concrete plans to go forward. Engagements have all taken place with much public interest. Date first materialised is for the public work on EWA done to date rather than outcomes of the archive itself. Our software developers also state they haves learned much in the development of EWA in terms of public engagement as well as archive design. Further to this (2016): We have developed strong links with the Society of Ethnobiology and International Society of Ethnobiology, both registered in the USA, and many of whose members will become Curators for EWA. Our links with SOAS and the PAW (Plants, Animals and Words) community have remained string and we have worked with other Connected Communities Projects, most notable that of Gemma Burford at Brighton University: Starting from Values - Evaluating Intangible Legacies. The full public impact of EWA globally will start to be realised later in 2016 when the Curator Network has been developed and the site is opened fully to public use. Interest has been strong across the BirdLife Partners, and potential projects engaging with EWA are developing in across many countries including several West and Eastern European countries, Turkey, Georgia (ex-soviet), Russia, Nigeria, Kenya, S. Africa, India, Pakistan, Japan, S. Korea, New Guinea, Australia, New Zealand, Chile, Peru, Brazil, Guyana, Mexico, USA, Canada. I must emphasise this is not an exhaustive list, but given that our principle effort has been to develop the EWA archive and site, this level of interest bodes very well for its reception. Through 2016 software developmemt of EWA continued under other funding, so that the archive is close to live release. Alpha and Beta testing continued under a follow-on grant. March 2017, the links made and reported above continue to be strong and active and EWA is nearing live activation and awaiting news of further funding.
First Year Of Impact 2014
Sector Communities and Social Services/Policy,Digital/Communication/Information Technologies (including Software),Education,Environment,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections
Impact Types Cultural,Societal
 
Description EWA Ethics, Terms & Conditions
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
URL https://www.ewa.ox.ac.uk/demo/app/webroot/pages/terms
 
Description EWA Protocols
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
Impact The development of EWA has influenced the way in which ethnobiological research and conservation practice will be undertaken. Our discussions with the Heads of more than 12 national BirdLife Partners, and with Community Development officers at BirdLife International in Cambridge, indicates receptivity to our approach in community participation through the use of the EWA facility. Most impact is yet to come. BirdLife's commitment to EWA is demonstrated by the new 'JustGiving' page for EWA set up under BirdLife International to raise funds for its upkeep by crowdfunding: see https://www.justgiving.com/ewa-fund
URL https://www.ewa.ox.ac.uk/demo/app/webroot/
 
Description AHRC Connected Communities Festival event
Amount £15,475 (GBP)
Organisation Arts & Humanities Research Council (AHRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK)
Start 06/2014 
 
Description Connected Communities Festival 2015
Amount £9,700 (GBP)
Organisation Arts & Humanities Research Council (AHRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK)
Start 07/2015 
End 09/2015
 
Description Follow-on Funding: The Human Side of Digitized Knowledge: Community Curation of the Ethno-ornithology World Archive
Amount £100,000 (GBP)
Funding ID AH/N006445/1 
Organisation Arts & Humanities Research Council (AHRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK)
Start 01/2016 
End 12/2016
 
Description OWRI - Open World Research Initiative: Creative Multilingualism
Amount £400,000 (GBP)
Funding ID AH/N004701/1 
Organisation Arts & Humanities Research Council (AHRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK)
Start 07/2016 
End 06/2020
 
Title Collaborative Ethnoscience 
Description Methodology has been developed for close liaison between researchers in biology, anthropology, linguistics and conservation as a result of the EWA project, especially together with our close association with the Plants, Animals and Words group, in which we were instrumental (e.g. funding the PAW worksop at University of Kent in 2014). In contrast to most previous work in this field we recommend team working in the field of teams of three consisting of a linguist, anthropologist/ethnobiologist and conservation practitioner/naturalist. 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2014 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact Although it may be more expensive than the lone-researcher approach, through PAW and BirdLife International we expect this model to become the standard approach. 
 
Title Curation Process and Network 
Description A network of 30 Curators around the world has been established, and curation procedures developed through an ongoing dialogue in relation to the continuing IT development (not funded under the current grant) of EWA: the Ethno-ornithology World Archive. We believe that EWA's curation procedures might serve as a valuable model for other archives in due course. 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact Until EWA goes live we can only speculate. 
URL https://www.ewa.ox.ac.uk/demo/app/webroot/
 
Title Ethno-ornithology World Archive 
Description EWA will be a database. I have created this entry to record that a substantial database of ethno-ornithological data will develop as a result of this work. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2016 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact All EWA impacts - see summary of EWA project 
URL https://www.ewa.ox.ac.uk/demo/app/webroot/
 
Description BirdLife International 
Organisation BirdLife International
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Learned Society 
PI Contribution The development of EWA is seen as valuable in contributing to the future development of BirdLife's Community Engagement Programme, by helping to find culturally-relevant solutions to bird conservation problems.
Collaborator Contribution Knowledge of the BirdLife Partnership network, and access to that network operating in more than 120 countries is proving invaluable to the development of EWA. Our consultant for this is Dr John Fanshawe, and he will remain a key link for the foreseeable future for EWA. Through EWA, we are developing a new paradigm for bird conservation through its enhancement of community engagement.
Impact The collaboration has contributed significantly to every aspect of EWA's development, and has delivered a network of regional NGOs (BirdLife Partners) to beta-test and then work with EWA. It is underwritten by the EWA MOU. Through our presence at two Society of Ethnobiology conferences (2014, 2015), the International Ornithological Congress (2014) and the International Society of Ethnobiology conference (2014), we have engaged interest from BirdLife Partners in the USA, Canada, Peru, Chile, Brazil, Poland and several other European countries, Georgia (former USSR), Nigeria, Kenya, South Africa, India, Pakistan, Japan, China, New Guinea, Australia and New Zealand. This is just the start but indicates the strength and value of the partnership.
Start Year 2013
 
Description BirdLife International support for crowd-funding initiative 
Organisation BirdLife International
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Learned Society 
PI Contribution The EWA project in total
Collaborator Contribution The main contributions of BirdLife International have been detailed elsewhere in this report, but here we record the set up of a dedicated account at BirdLife to hold crowd-funded moneys raised for the upkeep of EWA: The EWA Fund. Funds will be raised through portals in both BirdLife and EWA websites linked to the url details here.
Impact the justgiving page for EWA and any funds raised through it.
Start Year 2013
 
Description Connected Communities project: Creating Living Knowledge 
Organisation University of Bristol
Department School for Policy Studies
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Interviewed for project entitled 'Creating Living Knowledge'
Collaborator Contribution A day spent contributing information on EWA, which contributed to the book 'Creating Living Knowledge' published in 2016 by AHRC by Keri Face and Bryony Enright published in 2016
Impact Contributions to the publication" https://connected-communities.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/Creating-Living-Knowledge.Final_.pdf
Start Year 2016
 
Description Connected Communities project: Starting from Values - Evaluating Intangible Legacies 
Organisation University of Brighton
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We spent two days providing information about EWA during its development as an example of a project with diverse intangible legacies and values.
Collaborator Contribution We have received a helpful set of slides and what we consider a valid description of the values and legacies of EWA. The slides will be usable in future presentations about the development of EWA. We are happy that this slide set is of value to both projects.
Impact Apart from the slides mentioned above there are no published outputs to our knowledge. The collaboration is multi-disciplinary in so much as EWA is multidisciplinary involving, ornithology, conservation policy and practice, anthropology and linguistics.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Lynx Edicions, Barcelona 
Organisation Lynx Edicions
Country Spain, Kingdom of 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution The Partnership with Lynx Edicions involves a link between EWA and Handbook of Birds of the World Alive. Through the partnership agreement, users of HBW Alive will have access to relevant pages of EWA, and then to the whole of EWA.
Collaborator Contribution At our request, full summary details of every species in HBW Alive, which is every bird species in the world, has now been made freely available to the public. This is essential to fulfil the brief for EWA, but the work was done very quickly, with some cost to Lynx. This is a measure if their commitment to the EWA project.
Impact All species entries now list summary details under all headings together with a small illustration and global distribution map. Prior to working with EWA, only taxonomic details and conservation status were listed, and no illustration of distribution map.
Start Year 2013
 
Description PAW Workshops (SOAS and University of Kent) 
Organisation University of Kent
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The EWA project staff and grant were heavily involved in the planning and funding of a PAW (Plants, Animals and Words) workshop at the University of Kent 3-5 October 2014. This was held as the preliminary workshop described in the grant application and served the same function - to make linguists and ethnobiologists aware of EWA and to explore their requirements of such a system. This was the second PAW workshop, the first being held in 2013 at SOAS, and the PI has been involved in the planning and presentation of these meetings since the outset. The workshops are also developing a community of interdisciplinary-minded academics who will potentially work with EWA in the future.
Collaborator Contribution The workshop was hosted at the University of Kent, and both they and our colleagues at SOAS played a leading role in planning and delivery. Dialogue with SOAS linguists, and especially Dr Candide Simard, has been of immense value during the development of EWA.
Impact The Workshop at Kent 3-5 October brought together more than 50 reasearchers linking linguistics with ethno-biology and conservation. See http://paw.plantsanimalswords.org/page/2014resources and the rest of the conference website for more insights.
Start Year 2013
 
Description SOAS and David Nathan 
Organisation School of Oriental and African Studies (University of London)
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution SOAS is named in the grant as a Co-investigator, through the direct collaboration of David Nathan, Director of the Endangered languages Archive (ELAR). However, due to changes to the management of ELAR early in 2014, David left SOAS. As SOAS was no longer able to provide the services that had been agreed (ELAR still has no Director), the contract between our two departments was dissolved under mutual agreement. The funds were then redirected to engage David Nathan directly for three months. He continues to advise the EWA project and so we list the relationship as active.
Collaborator Contribution David has been a key advisor on linguistics and archive design and functionality from the onset and remains a valuable member of the EWA Group.
Impact David has contributed significantly to development of the Functional Specification and design of EWA - this work is ongoing.
Start Year 2014
 
Title EWA - The Ethno-ornithology World Archive 
Description EWA is the archive and its website and peripheral software that are the purpose of this grant. Hence this is the main output. The software, written in CAKE PHP is a bespoke application, now running on the Zoology Department server, which consists of the archive, website coming soon at https://www.ewa-archive.net/ . EWA has been granted the secure Oxford domain of https://www.ewa.ox.ac.uk/ and at the time of writing in test at https://www.ewa.ox.ac.uk/demo/app/webroot/ facilities for data entry online, browse, search (coming soon), mapping, data download, commenting on entries, static pages, Ts &Cs etc., links to external species-specific resources for Handbook of Birds of the World Alive, BirdLife international and Internet Bird Collection, and a funding support page at Just Giving which will be hosted under the BirdLife International site, and functionality for messaging between Admin, Submitters and Curators. The email account: ewa@zoo.ox.ac.uk has also been set up with access granted to the research team. 
Type Of Technology Software 
Year Produced 2016 
Impact All impacts of EWA - see other criteria 
URL https://www.ewa.ox.ac.uk/demo/app/webroot/
 
Title Functional Specification for EWA 
Description The full Functional Specification for EWA: the ethno-ornithology World Archive, has been developed with details of user scenarios, right through ethical protocols to wire-framing for the EWA archive. The document is the key working resource for EWA and was produced by the Research Group with some guidance from Oxford University's InfoDev Team. 
Type Of Technology Webtool/Application 
Year Produced 2014 
Impact The document forms the basis for the Ethno-ornithology World Archive, going live in 2015. It is available to the group on the Wideawake wordpress site, which is being used to collate working of the group. For access to this and to Infodev, which hosts ongoing work on the design team, please contact the PI and we shall grant access. 
URL http://thewideawake.wordpress.com/2014/11/07/short-forager-article-on-ewa/comment-page-1/#comment-23
 
Description 14th Congress of the International Society of Ethnobiology 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact The talk was followed by a group discussion that explored the great potential of EWA and the challenges we will face in achieving that potential. Throughout the conference individuals approached us seeking more information on the project and ways in which they might contribute.

Anne-Marie Wanamp from the University of Goroka in Papua New Guinea and Linda McDonald, an educator working with Kaska cultural and linguistic revitalization projects in Canadian Yukon territories, joined the EWA Advisory Board.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://isecongress2014bhutan.org
 
Description 2014 Conference of the International Society of Ethnobiology - Bhutan 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact We presented the concept and development of EWA and developed links for the Curator Network and recruited to the EWA Advisory Board.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.ethnobiology.net/what-we-do/international-congresses/past-congresses/
 
Description 26th International Ornithological Congress - Ethno-ornithology and Conservation Symposium - 21 August 2014 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact As Director of EWA, the PI convened the first ever full symposium in ethno-ornithology at an International Ornithological Congress. There was great support for this from an audience of more than 200. The five speakers from five continents generated considerable interest in ethno-ornithology and the EWA project.

As a result, we made significant contacts, including Regional Directors of BirdLife Partners, e.g. in S. America, Africa, Indonesia and S.E. Asia, who will be working with us to develop the EWA archive and its network.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://ioc26.jp
 
Description 26th International Ornithological Congress, Tokyo - Round Table Discussion on EWA 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact We presented the concept of EWA: the Ethno-ornithology World Archive to the ornithological community for the first time. Four members of the research development team spoke and we then opened discussion. There were many questions, most of which we had predicted and could answer, but all of which were satisfied by the end. There was significant movement of opinion, from concerned at the outset to supportive by the end because we had been considering the issues of concern for many months. This feedback was very valuable for the development of EWA.

We made a number of new international contacts who were keen to be involved in beta-testing EWA at the earliest opportunity, and who could be future EWA-partners and users.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://ioc26.jp
 
Description 37th Annual Society of Ethnobiology Meeting (2014 joint conference with the Society for Economic Botany) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact The talk was met with considerable enthusiasm and followed by an hour's discussion exploring projects that could develop through collaborations fostered by the archive, ways in which EWA might be used to encourage community engagement, and ways in which we might improve upon our design and user interface. Conversations about EWA continued throughout the remainder of the conference, numerous individuals signed up to our mailing list, and a particularly interesting project exploring Andean and Californian Condors via the EWA network was proposed.

The talk directly led to Nimachia Hernandez, a Native American scholar who works on topics in environmental philosophy and landscape literature with particular reference to the Blackfoot people, joining the EWA Advisory Board. She later participated in the Plants, Animals, Words Workshop at the University of Kent as a keynote speaker and has contributed greatly to the development of EWA in terms of our understanding of how indigenous populations in North America might work with the Archive.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://blogs.crikey.com.au/northern/2014/05/12/ethnoornithology-at-cherokee-north-carolina/?wpmp_swi...
 
Description A research presentation by Dr Karen Park at SoE Conference 2016 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact A lecture at the Society of Ethnobiology Conference in Tucson Arizona, USA on bird names and metaphor. The paper has been written up and submitted for publication in the Journal of Ethnbiology with Dr Felice Wyndham and is currently in review.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://ethnobiology.org/conference/past-conferences
 
Description AHRC Connected Communities Festival 1-2 July 2014 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Four members of the EWA team presented material on the forthcoming archive and engaged members of the public in discussion on Welsh folk names of birds, the importance of birds to the Welsh language and visa-versa, and the importance of both to education and nature conservation in Wales. A breakout session and an interview were videoed and are available to the public via the internet:

Breakout Session: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P3YAU2x41V8

Interview: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=obxkAqVYeJ8


The opportunity to discuss linguistic aspects of ethno-ornithology and the ways people might engage with EWA in a British, but non-English context was uniquely valuable in developing our thinking for EWA. We made significant contacts with the RSPB also, who will help to develop the EWA network for Public engagement in the future.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.ahrc.ac.uk/Funding-Opportunities/Research-funding/Connected-Communities/Events/Pages/Conn...
 
Description Conference presentation Chile 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The presentation and its host session on ethno-ornithology took almost a whole day of the conference, and was widely discussed.

300 brochures on the EWA project were disseminated, with several people confirming that they would like to be involved and/or use EWA in their projects.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Lecture at the Society of Ethnobiology Conference 2016 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact A research lecture by Dr Andrew Gosler at an International Conference in Tucson Arizona presenting original research findings. The paper has subsequently been submitted for publication and is currently in review with the Journal of Ethnobiology - the leading intervational journal in this field.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://ethnobiology.org/conference/past-conferences
 
Description Lecture on ethno-ornithology to British Ornithologists' Club 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The talk introduced an audience of amateur ornithologists to the concept of ethno-ornithology, and the EWA archive. There was much interest and discussion.

The event was valuable in assessing the potential degree of interest in ethno-ornithology and EWA in the amateur ornithological community, which numbers many tens of thousands in the UK. The conclusion was that interest was high and that most would look at the site and many might be interested to contribute to the archive.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Musings from Cloud Cuckoo Land 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact As part of the Linguamania Live Friday event at the Asmolean Museum on Friday 27 January 2017, Dr Karen Park (Linguist with the Ethno-ornithology World Archive) gave a public presentation entitled 'Musings from Cloud Cuckoo Land' (see bite-sized talks on the programmes available from the url given here) on aspects of bird naming around the world and the metaphorical 'meaning' of bird names. This was linked to the Words from Birds public participation event that ran simultaneously in Gallery 19 (see programme).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.ashmolean.org/livefriday/2017-01/
 
Description PAW2 2014 (Plants, Animals, Words workshop) University of Kent, 3-5 October 2014 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Most of a day of the workshop was given over to discussing EWA. The EWA team presented various elements of the EWA project and used a questionnaire to elicit views on some issues on which we had not been able to decide, and on the generality of ethno-ornithological issues - e.g. testing the statement 'everyone has a story about a bird'. The latter seems to be generally supported, and the discussions generated valuable feedback that helps to guide the development of EWA - community engagement is the key to the success of this project, and much of the work this year has focused on engaging the professional communities (ornithology, ethnobiology, linguistics and conservation) with the concept of EWA.

Many, but a key one is that we have made a decision on the strapline for EWA. This must sound trivial, but the need to express what EWA is to a multicultural audience, without offending anyone has been a major challenge. The most acceptable at this stage is 'EWA: a space to share knowledge of birds and people'.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://paw.plantsanimalswords.org/page/2014resources
 
Description RGS conference presentation 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Talk sparked 3 email discussions afterwards

A planned edited volume to be published based on the session presentations.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Sense and Nonsense across Languages: the Example of Bird-Naming 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact A talk entitled 'Sense and Nonsense across Languages: the Example of Bird-Naming' presented by Dr Andrew Gosler (EWA Director) and Prof. Martin Maiden, at the Creative Multilingualism conference at the Taylor Institute on 28 January 2017 in connection ith the Linguamania event in the Ashmolean Museum the previous evening.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.creativeml.ox.ac.uk/about/events/conference-languages-creativity
 
Description Society of Ethnobiology Conference 2014 - Cherokee, N. Carolina 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact We presented the rationale for EWA in a formal presentation and took the names of many ethnobiologists interested to know more in due course, and potentially willing to act as curators.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL https://ethnobiology.org/news/joint-society-ethnobiology-society-economic-botany-conference-may-11-1...
 
Description Society of Ethnobiology Conference 2015 - Santa Barbara 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact We presented an update of development of EWA and continued to meet and develop contacts for the future development of EWA, and especially for the Curator Network.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://ethnobiology.org/conference/upcoming
 
Description Words from Birds 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact As part of the Linguamania Live Friday event at the Ashmolean Museum on 27 January (see programme available from url given here) Drs Andrew Gosler and Karen Park of the Ethno-ornithology World Archive (EWA) hosted a word game for members of the public (see Ashmolean Gallery 19 on Programme) entitled 'Words from Birds' in which some 40 words in various languages of which half had avian roots (e.g. hen-pecked, but all less obvious than this!) were presented and people had to say if they thought the words were avian in origin. Members of the public in this case included people in approximately an age range of 8-80, and from many parts of the world - for example European, Asian and Pacific Island words were known or guessed by people from those regions.People were also invited to write down words that they thought might hae avian origins, for us to investgae and report back on. The event was very well received.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.ashmolean.org/livefriday/2017-01/