Voices of War and Peace

Lead Research Organisation: University of Birmingham
Department Name: Education

Abstract

With the launch of the Coalition's plans to mark the centenary of the Great War, the Communities Secretary observed: 'As the First World War moves out of common memory into history, we're determined to make sure these memories are retained', but which common memories did he have in mind? Remembering, just like forgetting, is always a political act. The war was a global conflict which left its mark on the local. Was it experienced differently in urban and rural areas? What were the relationships between soldiers and civilians during and after the war? Did it shape individual and community identities? Did it have different meanings for contemporaries? There was a consensus that the dead were to be commemorated and remembered, but there was less agreement over how the example of sacrifice was to be understood and the meanings to be attributed to and experiences to be drawn from acts of commemoration. How have these meanings changed over time? How will it be understood today? Is it a truism that 'the past is a foreign country: they do things differently there'? Certainly, Britain today is a very different country to that of 1914 and has been described by Parekh (2000) as 'a community of communities.' What sense will young people make of the local memorials to the dead which sit in the urban and rural landscapes and the acts of commemoration organised by an older generation which will centre upon them? What meaning will the war have for young people who have grown up in a society where live reports of conflict are readily available on a smartphone and where the return of the dead from Afghanistan is instantly reported in the media? How will they connect the past with their present and their future? As the First World War moves out of memory into history, what will be the record of commemoration they will have experienced that will be left after 2018 for future historians to reflect upon? These are just some of the questions which have been generated by reflecting on the joint Arts and Humanities Research Council/Heritage Lottery Fund commemorative project. These reflections have in turn shaped the 'Voices of War and Peace: the Great War and its Legacy' project proposal.

At the core of this cross disciplinary project is an institutional commitment to community engagement with research and a professional commitment 'in a mission of understanding' to investigate, analyse, apprehend, criticize and judge and thereby translate Edward Said's idea of 'communities of interpretation' into practice (Said 2003). Using Birmingham, the UK's second city, as its primary place of memory, the project will reach out to multiple communities/publics both local and national to explore through dialogue issues around memory, remembering and commemoration. The research network will respond to community requests for support in terms of capacity building and support community driven research agenda. Working with other funded centres and the National Coordinating Centre for Public Engagement (NCCPE) the project will invest in developing the community engagement experience of early career researchers. A strength of the network beyond its relevant knowledge expertise is the experience embedded within its membership of effective partnership working. As an internationally engaged network, it will seek out relations with cultural institutions in Birmingham's sister cities and through the Universitas 21 network to understand other national and local processes of commemoration and thereby further illuminate our understanding of memorial activities in the UK. Sharing knowledge, expertise and resources, it is intended that the project will leave its own legacy for community/academy relations in terms of the capacity for the co-design and co-production of research, an understanding of the complicated relationship between remembering and forgetting and a desire to continue to 'think forward through the past'.

Planned Impact

Many groups can be identified that will benefit from the Voices of War and Peace project. The most direct beneficiaries will be the partner organisations who have agreed to collaborate and whose letters of support are included with this application. These organisations will benefit from their staff being involved in working across the academy/cultural sector divide and gaining insights into the research culture to be found in the university sector. None of the partners currently have the capacity to be identified as independent research organisations but involvement in the project will support the development of a research culture especially through the engagement of those participants in the University Cultural Partnership Honorary Research Fellow and Associate scheme. In particular this will impact on the Library of Birmingham and Birmingham Museums Trust and their ambition to move towards possible Independent Research Organisation status.

Partner organisations will also have gained increased understanding of the needs, interests and knowledge of communities be they local, regional or virtual and also insights into the community research agendas of the National Coordinating Centre for Public Engagement [NCCPE] and the AHRC.

A second, but as yet difficult to quantify, group of benificiaries will be the various communities who will have engaged in dialogue with the researchers in the network and in collaborative research. At the heart of the AHRC/HLF/NCCPE initiative around the commemoration of the First World War is a capacity building agenda. Active engagement in researching community heritage projects will have been supported by the research network through the provision of workshops which will mean that individuals can gain skills relevant to ensuring that heritage is better looked after, managed, understood and shared including, among others, conservation, digital and project management skills. Relationships are at the core of the quality of life in geographically defined communities and active engagement in participatory and inclusive community heritage projects can strengthen the resilience of communities and the sense of belonging. The dialogue between communities and researchers around the commemoration of the First World War will have focused on sensitive issues around what is remembered and what is forgotten and will have drawn attention to different interpretations of the past. The ideas of 'community' and 'collective memory' are embedded in these interpretations and reflecting on how the past is made accessible in the present will have the potential to enable individuals and communities to understand how they are positioned in relation to the past.

A third group of beneficiaries will be those members of the research network, including Early Career Researchers, who have little or no experience of working with communities on heritage related projects as the Centre will organise training and workshops on undertaking public engagement.

Organisations

Publications


10 25 50
Andrews M (2014) The Home Front in Britain
Andrews, M (2017) Women in Agriculture
Andrews, M (2015) The WI's Rural Retailing and Markets 1915-1939: a WWI legacy in History of Retailing and Consumption
Andrews, M (2016) Tropes and Trench Cakes: The Home Front in the Media and Community History in Twentieth Century British History
Andrews, M (2014) The Home Front in Britain
Andrews, M (2015) Rethinking the significance of the 'Home' in the West Midlands Home Front in Women's History : the journal of the Women's History Network
Charlotte Methuen Glasgow's Faculty of Divinity in the First World War in Journal of the Scottish Church History Society
 
Title 'Not All Jam and Jerusalem', an exhibition and series of events in the Hive at Worcester to celebrate the formation of the Womens Institute Movement in 1915 as part of the Being Human: Festival of the Humanities 
Description 17- 25 November Exhibition in the Hive atrium - with both images, text and artefacts including needlework, canning machines etc. 18 November Activity day - there was play on the formation of the WI put on by the Worcestershire WI themselves, screenings of a film produced on the WI in WW2, a WWI bake-off judged by the WI and a range of practical demonstrations and artefacts to demonstrate wartime cookery and handicrafts. About 300 plus members of WIs, general public and students attended the day 19 November Lecture - on formation of WI and WI in wartime attended by about 60 20 November - workshop on preserving WI archives attended by approximately 15 WI members 
Type Of Art Artistic/Creative Exhibition 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact Developed both the general public and the Women's Institutes own understanding and engagement with their histories. 
 
Title 'Voices of War' exhibition, Library of Birmingham, September-December 2014 
Description 'Voices of War' is an exhibition based on the important archives relating to the First World War held by the city of Birmingham archives. It has generated significant interest among local communities, schools and academics. 
Type Of Art Artistic/Creative Exhibition 
Year Produced 2014 
Impact Comments posted during the exhibition indicate how it has both informed and changed attitudes. 
URL http://www.voicesofwarandpeace.org/portfolio/exhibition-voices-of-war/
 
Title Exhibition as part of the Pershore Plum Festival 
Description Exhibition with other heritage activities in the town hall 
Type Of Art Artistic/Creative Exhibition 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact New contacts engagement with local people - saw about 180 over the weekend - some will be followed up for oral history interviews. 
 
Title The Lost Boys 
Description At the outbreak of World War 1, the legal age limit for armed service overseas in the British Army was 19 years, yet by the end of the war an estimated 250,000 underage soldiers between the ages of 14 and 18 had seen active service. This exhibition featured three elements of commemoration of young people and families affected by World War 1, using the medium of ceramic plates, flowers and models. The first part of the exhibition featured work in progress from a project working with young people in the Staffordshire area, which explored memory and commemoration in relation to the North Staffordshire Regiment and the experiences of underage soldiers in the First World War. The second part of the exhibition featured ceramics that commemorate the memories of people from the Manchester/North West area, and looked at the wider issues of all the young people affected by World War 1, from young children left behind or bereaved to young protesters and pacifists who opposed the war. Finally, the exhibition featured original works by acclaimed ceramicist, project lead and curator of the exhibition, Professor Steve Dixon (MMU), whose work has led the way in re-figuring war commemoration in this medium, in terms of collective memory and public engagement. 
Type Of Art Artistic/Creative Exhibition 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact The exhibition was part of the Voices community research fund project, 'The Lost Boys: remembering the boy soldiers of the First World War through ceramics', a collaboration between The Clay Foundation, Staffordshire Museums Consortium and Manchester Metropolitan University. The exhibition will also tour to other venues alter in 2016. 
URL http://www2.mmu.ac.uk/hip/war/the-lost-boys-of-ww1-exhibition/
 
Title WWI Cookbook for schools 
Description Downloadable children's WWI cookery book put together by Andy Stevenson and Graphic Design students from University of Worcester with input from Prof Maggie Andrews. 
Type Of Art Artefact (including digital) 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact It is being used in a local school - Hempsted, 4 schools involved Droitwich HLF projects 
URL http://www.worc.ac.uk/discover/world-war-one-childrens-ecookbook-produced-by-university-of-worcester...
 
Title Youtube Video - "Learning from the Boer War" - Created for the History West Midlands group. 
Description Working with the History West Midlands group I have recorded a 15 minute video presentation discussing the influence of the Boer War (1899 - 1902) on the British Army of 1914. Initially this was made available only to members of the History West Midlands subscription list but as of August 10 2015 it has been made publically available on YouTube. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact History West Midlands has reported a notable increase in requests for further information relating to the video. I too have been contacted by several members of the public requesting further information. 
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W8jitGtA1x4
 
Description The award is still live and both findings and impact are still being explored. Details of achievements to date and non-academic impact will be found in the Interim Report for AHRC to be submitted by March 30th. Findings to date have been presented at two international events linked to the role of the universities and public engagement, see Engagement entries.
First Year Of Impact 2015
Sector Communities and Social Services/Policy,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections
Impact Types Cultural,Societal
 
Description Being Young on the Home Front: Young People in North West England during World War One 
Organisation Manchester Metropolitan University
Department Department of Health Professions
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Project Team Dr Marcus Morris, Department of History, Politics and Philosophy, Manchester Metropolitan University, Sue Reddish, Creative practitioner, Jim Dalziel, Independent Film Maker, Prof Melanie Tebbutt, Department of History, Politics and Philosophy, Manchester Metropolitan University. • Sue Reddish will co-ordinate, design and manage the creative project, directly and act as overall project manager; • Marcus Morris and Melanie Tebbutt will undertake research in local and online archives to facilitate youth groups' work; • Sue Reddish and Jim Dalziel will make links with local youth groups and other connected groups; • Marcus Morris will organise study days and write support materials for youth groups; • Marcus Morris will provide advice, support and materials in person or by email, responding to queries and questions; • Marcus Morris will manage the project budget; • Sue Reddish will co-ordinate and take responsibility for ensuring the research, youth group activities and outputs is undertaken and exhibited through various media; • Marcus Morris will co-author an article on the local effects of the war on young people with members of youth groups for the Manchester Region History Review; • Marcus Morris will edit a special edition of the Journal of War and Culture Studies - in collaboration with Prof. Maggie Andrews at Worcester - focused on WW1 and young people, and contribute to an article on the impact of war as part of this.
Collaborator Contribution The partner organisations will: • Recruit and support a group of young people to attend the creative research and rehearsal sessions required for the successful completion of the project; • Provide a youth worker to work with the young people on the project providing on going pastoral care and additional support to the creative team and youth group; • Support the project in-kind by providing their space for the devising and rehearsal sessions; • Attend the skills sharing sessions and give creative input into the completion of the resource pack for other youth workers; • Participate in the sharing event and invite their community network; • Help to monitor the project, attending planning sessions and evaluations as required.
Impact By the end of the project, young people will have engaged with researching and communicating the histories of young people in WW1 and will have considered those diverse experiences in relation to their own. They will also have the opportunity to experience a university environment for, in many cases, the first time. Academic and community partners alike will have a greater understanding of the diverse experiences of young people on the urban home front during WW1. Further research and publications in both the academic and community spheres will have been produced. Academic staff at MMU will have developed greater understanding and experience of working with community and youth groups, in public engagement and in the co-production of research-based community outputs. Specific outputs A project film, edited and created for the participant groups, that documents the creative process and showcases the creative output. This will be available online and be screened in public locations, such as Archives+ and at MMU venues. It will be uploaded to the websites of 'Voices of War and Peace' and the Manchester Centre for Youth Studies. A presentation day where the participating groups showcase their creations to an audience. The film, combined with the learning resource pack compiled by the Primary Researcher, will be launched to a wider youth worker network to support their further work. The resource pack will also be uploaded to the websites. An article co-authored with members of participating groups on young people in the Manchester area during WW1 to be published in the Manchester Region History Review. A special edition of the Journal of War and Culture Studies jointly edited with Maggie Andrews from the University of Worcester. An academic evaluation of the project compiled by the Centre for Youth Studies at MMU. An engagement co-production model for similar projects.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Being Young on the Home Front: Young People in North West England during World War One 
Organisation Salford City Council
Department Little Hulton and Walkden Neighbourhood Team
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Project Team Dr Marcus Morris, Department of History, Politics and Philosophy, Manchester Metropolitan University, Sue Reddish, Creative practitioner, Jim Dalziel, Independent Film Maker, Prof Melanie Tebbutt, Department of History, Politics and Philosophy, Manchester Metropolitan University. • Sue Reddish will co-ordinate, design and manage the creative project, directly and act as overall project manager; • Marcus Morris and Melanie Tebbutt will undertake research in local and online archives to facilitate youth groups' work; • Sue Reddish and Jim Dalziel will make links with local youth groups and other connected groups; • Marcus Morris will organise study days and write support materials for youth groups; • Marcus Morris will provide advice, support and materials in person or by email, responding to queries and questions; • Marcus Morris will manage the project budget; • Sue Reddish will co-ordinate and take responsibility for ensuring the research, youth group activities and outputs is undertaken and exhibited through various media; • Marcus Morris will co-author an article on the local effects of the war on young people with members of youth groups for the Manchester Region History Review; • Marcus Morris will edit a special edition of the Journal of War and Culture Studies - in collaboration with Prof. Maggie Andrews at Worcester - focused on WW1 and young people, and contribute to an article on the impact of war as part of this.
Collaborator Contribution The partner organisations will: • Recruit and support a group of young people to attend the creative research and rehearsal sessions required for the successful completion of the project; • Provide a youth worker to work with the young people on the project providing on going pastoral care and additional support to the creative team and youth group; • Support the project in-kind by providing their space for the devising and rehearsal sessions; • Attend the skills sharing sessions and give creative input into the completion of the resource pack for other youth workers; • Participate in the sharing event and invite their community network; • Help to monitor the project, attending planning sessions and evaluations as required.
Impact By the end of the project, young people will have engaged with researching and communicating the histories of young people in WW1 and will have considered those diverse experiences in relation to their own. They will also have the opportunity to experience a university environment for, in many cases, the first time. Academic and community partners alike will have a greater understanding of the diverse experiences of young people on the urban home front during WW1. Further research and publications in both the academic and community spheres will have been produced. Academic staff at MMU will have developed greater understanding and experience of working with community and youth groups, in public engagement and in the co-production of research-based community outputs. Specific outputs A project film, edited and created for the participant groups, that documents the creative process and showcases the creative output. This will be available online and be screened in public locations, such as Archives+ and at MMU venues. It will be uploaded to the websites of 'Voices of War and Peace' and the Manchester Centre for Youth Studies. A presentation day where the participating groups showcase their creations to an audience. The film, combined with the learning resource pack compiled by the Primary Researcher, will be launched to a wider youth worker network to support their further work. The resource pack will also be uploaded to the websites. An article co-authored with members of participating groups on young people in the Manchester area during WW1 to be published in the Manchester Region History Review. A special edition of the Journal of War and Culture Studies jointly edited with Maggie Andrews from the University of Worcester. An academic evaluation of the project compiled by the Centre for Youth Studies at MMU. An engagement co-production model for similar projects.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Erskine Centenary Community Partnership 
Organisation University of Glasgow
Department School of Life Sciences Glasgow
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The lead academic partners will undertake rigorous research into the Erskine Archive, as well as provide the following: • research expertise and guidance for academics and non-academics interested in Erskine • content for public talks and websites from their own research • overarching planning and administrative support to establish and enhance connections between various partners and to organise public outreach events • supervision of student interns and course-related placements to assist community groups in conducting and accessing research • access to expertise and support of staff based within the University of Glasgow Archives and Special Collections
Collaborator Contribution Erskine will provide • venue for public outreach events • access to its wide network of contacts to advertise and promote events and activities Digging In will provide • venue for public outreach events at Heritage Lottery-funded WWI recreation trenches in Glasgow's Pollok Park • opportunities for members of the public to contribute knowledge and expertise by creating display materials and guided tours for open days
Impact This project brought to light new insight into Erskine in WWI by accessing the previously unavailable historical archive. Furthermore, this was done with the explicit aim of engaging the public. On-going research is being disseminated via social media, which is appropriate for a public-facing project, as well as the participation in regular events and open days organised by our community partners (Erskine and Digging In). This brought research to a diverse audience and encouraged the exploration of the Erskine archive by other academic projects, as well as citizen researchers in the wider community. Research generated will be the intellectual property of the individual researcher, be they academic, student, or member of the public. Research is shared via blogs and social media with permission. Any research presented by the applicants in formal academic publication or presentation will be duly acknowledged. Research is shared with partner organisations for educational outreach and engagement. By embedding research within the outreach activities of the two partner organisations, fresh, cutting-edge academic research was made available to the public as it happened. Furthermore, supported and encouraged community-led research by working with volunteers to contribute to these events and activities. The project leads worked with community and student volunteers to identify topics for research and generate outputs including but not limited to, static display material at open day/event, curation of online exhibition like captioned Flickr album or HistoryPin tour, public talks, blog posts, and guided tours. By providing guidance and expertise to students and members of the public, this project has enhanced practical research skills and confidence. The collaborative nature of this work also strengthened the skills of all involved, including the academic partners. It presented research in a way that is practical and meaningful to a broad audience of both academics and non-academics.
Start Year 2016
 
Description From Flanders to Helmand: Chaplaincy, Faith and Religious Change in the British Army, 1914-2014 
Organisation British Armed Forces
Department Royal Army Chaplains' Department
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Lead academic compiled a list of themes and questions to be addressed in the oral history interviews, which he conducted in May-June 2016 at the Armed Forces Chaplaincy Centre. He ensured that due academic preparation is made for these interviews and that follow-up research and appropriate fact-checking is conducted afterwards. Using these interviews and other personal materials collected from and by chaplains, and in conjunction with the research assistant, he planned, wrote, and presented the conference paper and the articles arising from the project. The lead academic also ensured that all primary materials gathered or generated during the course of the project are deposited with the Museum of Army Chaplaincy upon its completion. The lead academic also oversaw all budgetary matters and ensure that the project adheres to the ethical guidelines set by Durham University. The project's early career research assistant will be responsible for preparatory research for the oral history interviews, for subsequent research, fact-checking, and for the co-planning, co-presentation, and co-writing of the conference papers and articles arising from the project.
Collaborator Contribution The community partner oversaw the contribution of the RAChD. This included the recruitment and selection of a representative body of volunteer interviewees and a call through RAChD channels for personal materials for use in the project and for deposit at the Museum of Army Chaplaincy. they also organised the timetable of interviews at the Armed Forces Chaplaincy Centre, and dealt with any logistical, pastoral and personnel issues connected with the interviewees. They arranged appropriate clearance of interview transcripts with the MoD (references to special forces operations are sensitive) and read drafts of the conference papers and articles, providing critical feedback and supplementary information where appropriate.
Impact • Outputs/Impacts 1 and 2: Two iterations of a conference paper to be presented at two separate conferences in England and Scotland in July 2016. The audience for both will consist of registered attendees and the size and composition of these audiences will be readily ascertainable. • Output/Impact 3: An academic article for an international, peer-reviewed journal that will conform to Open Access requirements and will be available through Durham University's institutional repository, Durham Research Online. The use of this article as an Open Access resource can be clearly monitored through this online resource. • Output/Impact 4: The adoption of this article as a core training aid for new-entry army chaplains, to be used in conjunction with the RAChD's mandatory 'Realities of War' study visit to the battlefields of the Western Front. The number of professional users can be tracked year-on-year via the training records of the RAChD and the Armed Forces Chaplaincy Centre. The two non-academic outcomes and impacts are as follows: • Output/Impact 1: A summative, non-academic article for the Voices of War and Peace website and for the annual Journal of the Royal Army Chaplains' Department. The number of hits on this wesbite can be readily ascertained and monitored by the co-ordinator of the Voices of War and Peace engagement centre, while the circulation (national and international) of the Journal of the Royal Army Chaplains' Department currently stands at around 3,000. • Output/Impact 2: The creation of a significant new collection of historical material by and for army chaplains, creating a heightened historical awareness within the RAChD and a greater sense of collective ownership of its history and experiences.
Start Year 2016
 
Description From Flanders to Helmand: Chaplaincy, Faith and Religious Change in the British Army, 1914-2014 
Organisation Durham University
Department Department of Geography
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Lead academic compiled a list of themes and questions to be addressed in the oral history interviews, which he conducted in May-June 2016 at the Armed Forces Chaplaincy Centre. He ensured that due academic preparation is made for these interviews and that follow-up research and appropriate fact-checking is conducted afterwards. Using these interviews and other personal materials collected from and by chaplains, and in conjunction with the research assistant, he planned, wrote, and presented the conference paper and the articles arising from the project. The lead academic also ensured that all primary materials gathered or generated during the course of the project are deposited with the Museum of Army Chaplaincy upon its completion. The lead academic also oversaw all budgetary matters and ensure that the project adheres to the ethical guidelines set by Durham University. The project's early career research assistant will be responsible for preparatory research for the oral history interviews, for subsequent research, fact-checking, and for the co-planning, co-presentation, and co-writing of the conference papers and articles arising from the project.
Collaborator Contribution The community partner oversaw the contribution of the RAChD. This included the recruitment and selection of a representative body of volunteer interviewees and a call through RAChD channels for personal materials for use in the project and for deposit at the Museum of Army Chaplaincy. they also organised the timetable of interviews at the Armed Forces Chaplaincy Centre, and dealt with any logistical, pastoral and personnel issues connected with the interviewees. They arranged appropriate clearance of interview transcripts with the MoD (references to special forces operations are sensitive) and read drafts of the conference papers and articles, providing critical feedback and supplementary information where appropriate.
Impact • Outputs/Impacts 1 and 2: Two iterations of a conference paper to be presented at two separate conferences in England and Scotland in July 2016. The audience for both will consist of registered attendees and the size and composition of these audiences will be readily ascertainable. • Output/Impact 3: An academic article for an international, peer-reviewed journal that will conform to Open Access requirements and will be available through Durham University's institutional repository, Durham Research Online. The use of this article as an Open Access resource can be clearly monitored through this online resource. • Output/Impact 4: The adoption of this article as a core training aid for new-entry army chaplains, to be used in conjunction with the RAChD's mandatory 'Realities of War' study visit to the battlefields of the Western Front. The number of professional users can be tracked year-on-year via the training records of the RAChD and the Armed Forces Chaplaincy Centre. The two non-academic outcomes and impacts are as follows: • Output/Impact 1: A summative, non-academic article for the Voices of War and Peace website and for the annual Journal of the Royal Army Chaplains' Department. The number of hits on this wesbite can be readily ascertained and monitored by the co-ordinator of the Voices of War and Peace engagement centre, while the circulation (national and international) of the Journal of the Royal Army Chaplains' Department currently stands at around 3,000. • Output/Impact 2: The creation of a significant new collection of historical material by and for army chaplains, creating a heightened historical awareness within the RAChD and a greater sense of collective ownership of its history and experiences.
Start Year 2016
 
Description From World War 1 to World Conflicts Today: a comparative study of changing narrations of war and peace in a superdiverse East Birmingham community 
Organisation Unity Hubb
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Dr Joanna Skelt will be responsible for guiding the overall project, for maintaining adherence to university ethical practices and for interpreting the research data element in consultation with the community partners, Unity Hubb via Rashta Butt, the Centre Manager. The recruitment and monitoring of the community engagement element will be shared between Rashta Butt and Joanna Skelt. Once appointed, the community assistant will work alongside Joanna in interviews and in the reading group and the photographer or community artist will work closely alongside all the team members and gain valuable and in depth community knowledge from Unity Hubb staff and volunteers. Training in narrative techniques will be targeted towards research but general approaches to working with narratives will be shared across the team and everyone will be encouraged to develop and reflect on best practice. Joanna and Rashta will meet regularly throughout the project and will discuss plans, delivery and evaluation at each stage. Rashta and Unity Hubb will lead on curating the exhibition and inviting community members to attend the event.
Collaborator Contribution Dr Joanna Skelt will be responsible for guiding the overall project, for maintaining adherence to university ethical practices and for interpreting the research data element in consultation with the community partners, Unity Hubb via Rashta Butt, the Centre Manager. The recruitment and monitoring of the community engagement element will be shared between Rashta Butt and Joanna Skelt. Once appointed, the community assistant will work alongside Joanna in interviews and in the reading group and the photographer or community artist will work closely alongside all the team members and gain valuable and in depth community knowledge from Unity Hubb staff and volunteers. Training in narrative techniques will be targeted towards research but general approaches to working with narratives will be shared across the team and everyone will be encouraged to develop and reflect on best practice. Joanna and Rashta will meet regularly throughout the project and will discuss plans, delivery and evaluation at each stage. Rashta and Unity Hubb will lead on curating the exhibition and inviting community members to attend the event.
Impact This project will lead to an exhibition of prints and text which will remain with Unity Hubb for future events as part of its legacy of community project work. It will produce at least one research paper and potentially a larger grant application. We hope to share practice about our collaboration for audiences interested in community based research and arts and narrative based research methodology via joint presentation. We envisage this to be of interest to researchers and community practitioners because of relating WW1 family and cultural historical narratives within contemporary debates about conflict and peace within a superdiverse British locality. For Unity Hubb, this project will build capacity by helping the centre engage and develop expertise and better knowledge of working with residents from wider heritage backgrounds (the majority of current users are of Pakistani heritage). It will also build expertise on community engagement practice using distinct cultural histories to connect with the heritage of the communities living in Ward End today. It will offer a new platform for the Hubb to engage in an inclusive project (with a 'unity', intercultural and peace agenda) in an area which has struggled to connect UK heritage events with the locality. Unity Hubb will also gain exhibition resources from the project which will add to the contemporary legacy of the community in which it is situated. It will also help the Hubb to develop further projects and establish strong links with academia and with arts and heritage sectors. The community assistant will also build skills and experience within a community and research environment.
Start Year 2017
 
Description From World War 1 to World Conflicts Today: a comparative study of changing narrations of war and peace in a superdiverse East Birmingham community 
Organisation University of Birmingham
Department School of Physics and Astronomy
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Dr Joanna Skelt will be responsible for guiding the overall project, for maintaining adherence to university ethical practices and for interpreting the research data element in consultation with the community partners, Unity Hubb via Rashta Butt, the Centre Manager. The recruitment and monitoring of the community engagement element will be shared between Rashta Butt and Joanna Skelt. Once appointed, the community assistant will work alongside Joanna in interviews and in the reading group and the photographer or community artist will work closely alongside all the team members and gain valuable and in depth community knowledge from Unity Hubb staff and volunteers. Training in narrative techniques will be targeted towards research but general approaches to working with narratives will be shared across the team and everyone will be encouraged to develop and reflect on best practice. Joanna and Rashta will meet regularly throughout the project and will discuss plans, delivery and evaluation at each stage. Rashta and Unity Hubb will lead on curating the exhibition and inviting community members to attend the event.
Collaborator Contribution Dr Joanna Skelt will be responsible for guiding the overall project, for maintaining adherence to university ethical practices and for interpreting the research data element in consultation with the community partners, Unity Hubb via Rashta Butt, the Centre Manager. The recruitment and monitoring of the community engagement element will be shared between Rashta Butt and Joanna Skelt. Once appointed, the community assistant will work alongside Joanna in interviews and in the reading group and the photographer or community artist will work closely alongside all the team members and gain valuable and in depth community knowledge from Unity Hubb staff and volunteers. Training in narrative techniques will be targeted towards research but general approaches to working with narratives will be shared across the team and everyone will be encouraged to develop and reflect on best practice. Joanna and Rashta will meet regularly throughout the project and will discuss plans, delivery and evaluation at each stage. Rashta and Unity Hubb will lead on curating the exhibition and inviting community members to attend the event.
Impact This project will lead to an exhibition of prints and text which will remain with Unity Hubb for future events as part of its legacy of community project work. It will produce at least one research paper and potentially a larger grant application. We hope to share practice about our collaboration for audiences interested in community based research and arts and narrative based research methodology via joint presentation. We envisage this to be of interest to researchers and community practitioners because of relating WW1 family and cultural historical narratives within contemporary debates about conflict and peace within a superdiverse British locality. For Unity Hubb, this project will build capacity by helping the centre engage and develop expertise and better knowledge of working with residents from wider heritage backgrounds (the majority of current users are of Pakistani heritage). It will also build expertise on community engagement practice using distinct cultural histories to connect with the heritage of the communities living in Ward End today. It will offer a new platform for the Hubb to engage in an inclusive project (with a 'unity', intercultural and peace agenda) in an area which has struggled to connect UK heritage events with the locality. Unity Hubb will also gain exhibition resources from the project which will add to the contemporary legacy of the community in which it is situated. It will also help the Hubb to develop further projects and establish strong links with academia and with arts and heritage sectors. The community assistant will also build skills and experience within a community and research environment.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Generations of Commemoration: Re-Presenting the Legacy of the Great War 
Organisation Birmingham City University
Department Birmingham Centre for Media and Cultural Research
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Both academics involved in the project are trained historians and lead the BCMCR research cluster 'History, Heritage and Archives'. In this context both have worked as media and cultural historians, archive experts and media producers, and collaborated with a variety of public institutions and communities of interest, to draw attention to neglected histories, to respond to the opportunities afforded by new digital technologies, to disseminate archived material, and to interpret it for wide audiences.
Collaborator Contribution SCA is a small arts organisation developing community projects in consultation with adults, children and local community groups. We seek to build awareness, a sense of ownership and a creative response to the secret history, living stories and wild green spaces hidden in the urban environment. Our specialism is to work inclusively, sharing creative skills development to facilitate people and communities to discover, explore and make a creative response to their own locality. We work closely with the local Archive service to bring historical materials out into the community, and create exciting project outcomes in the form of live performance, film, audio work and publications.
Impact A report on SCA best practice and application to commemorative activities inclusive of insights from community participants; Identification and engagement of at least three community groups in three locations within the geographical domain of VoW in WW1 commemoration activities; A report on AV materials on 'Representations of Commemoration' and their use in community engagement projects; A portfolio and presentation of creative materials and interpretations produced by project participants (e.g. maps; analyses; contextualisations of AV materials); A report/tool-kit for public history practices (focussed on WW1 commemoration but with wider application); At least one co-authored academic journal article and presentation on WW1 public history practice.
Start Year 2016
 
Description Generations of Commemoration: Re-Presenting the Legacy of the Great War 
Organisation Secret City Arts
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Both academics involved in the project are trained historians and lead the BCMCR research cluster 'History, Heritage and Archives'. In this context both have worked as media and cultural historians, archive experts and media producers, and collaborated with a variety of public institutions and communities of interest, to draw attention to neglected histories, to respond to the opportunities afforded by new digital technologies, to disseminate archived material, and to interpret it for wide audiences.
Collaborator Contribution SCA is a small arts organisation developing community projects in consultation with adults, children and local community groups. We seek to build awareness, a sense of ownership and a creative response to the secret history, living stories and wild green spaces hidden in the urban environment. Our specialism is to work inclusively, sharing creative skills development to facilitate people and communities to discover, explore and make a creative response to their own locality. We work closely with the local Archive service to bring historical materials out into the community, and create exciting project outcomes in the form of live performance, film, audio work and publications.
Impact A report on SCA best practice and application to commemorative activities inclusive of insights from community participants; Identification and engagement of at least three community groups in three locations within the geographical domain of VoW in WW1 commemoration activities; A report on AV materials on 'Representations of Commemoration' and their use in community engagement projects; A portfolio and presentation of creative materials and interpretations produced by project participants (e.g. maps; analyses; contextualisations of AV materials); A report/tool-kit for public history practices (focussed on WW1 commemoration but with wider application); At least one co-authored academic journal article and presentation on WW1 public history practice.
Start Year 2016
 
Description Justice, not Charity, Was Their Cry 
Organisation Disability History Scotland
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Academic Role and Responsibilities • To ensure the project meets agreed milestones and is delivered successfully. • To undertake the research plan, co-produced in partnership with Disability History Scotland. • To identify potential volunteer researchers from outside DHS. • To deliver training a training programme for volunteers, including: * undertaking research in newspaper archives. * presenting findings from old newspaper records. * assembling a catalogue of the sources located so that they may be used for subsequent interpretation and incorporation into a narrative. • To co-produce the research findings as a text for publication or other suitable output (e.g. blog posts, displays, podcasts). • To disseminate findings from the research, including a final report. • To ensure the link between both partners continues beyond this project.
Collaborator Contribution Community Partner Role and Responsibilities • To ensure the project meets agreed milestones and is delivered successfully. • To co-produce the research plan. • To provide project administration. • To identify and recruit volunteer researchers from DHS and the wider community. • To arrange volunteer training and support. • To co-produce the research findings as a text for publication. • To publish the research in accessible formats. • To disseminate findings from the research, including a final report. • To ensure the project is accessible to a wide and diverse audience via the DHS website and through a programme of outreach and community engagement. • To ensure the link between both partners continues beyond this project.
Impact • A co-authored publication by the partners (in a range of inclusive formats such as hard copy, electronic and easy read versions) setting out the march experience in its social, economic and political context, particularly from the perspective of the Scottish contingents therefore bringing their role to a Scottish audience. It would be written in compliance with academic rigour while being in a style accessible to a general audience. • A video of the launch event and podcasts of interviews (subtitled) related to the project will be uploaded onto the Disability History Scotland & Voices of War & Peace websites, where they will form part of the archive which we are currently designing. This will be managed by our current volunteers and project worker. All digital output on our website is free to access and download. • A high profile seminar on the theme of Justice Not Charity would be used to launch the publication and disseminate its findings to a diverse audience. • Volunteer researchers would gain new skills and participants would be given a certificate of recognition at the end of the project. • Possible ancillary output, aimed at an academic audience, might take the form of a co-authored conference paper and journal article for the likes of Scottish Labour History or Medical Humanities.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Justice, not Charity, Was Their Cry 
Organisation University of Birmingham
Department School of Mathematics
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Academic Role and Responsibilities • To ensure the project meets agreed milestones and is delivered successfully. • To undertake the research plan, co-produced in partnership with Disability History Scotland. • To identify potential volunteer researchers from outside DHS. • To deliver training a training programme for volunteers, including: * undertaking research in newspaper archives. * presenting findings from old newspaper records. * assembling a catalogue of the sources located so that they may be used for subsequent interpretation and incorporation into a narrative. • To co-produce the research findings as a text for publication or other suitable output (e.g. blog posts, displays, podcasts). • To disseminate findings from the research, including a final report. • To ensure the link between both partners continues beyond this project.
Collaborator Contribution Community Partner Role and Responsibilities • To ensure the project meets agreed milestones and is delivered successfully. • To co-produce the research plan. • To provide project administration. • To identify and recruit volunteer researchers from DHS and the wider community. • To arrange volunteer training and support. • To co-produce the research findings as a text for publication. • To publish the research in accessible formats. • To disseminate findings from the research, including a final report. • To ensure the project is accessible to a wide and diverse audience via the DHS website and through a programme of outreach and community engagement. • To ensure the link between both partners continues beyond this project.
Impact • A co-authored publication by the partners (in a range of inclusive formats such as hard copy, electronic and easy read versions) setting out the march experience in its social, economic and political context, particularly from the perspective of the Scottish contingents therefore bringing their role to a Scottish audience. It would be written in compliance with academic rigour while being in a style accessible to a general audience. • A video of the launch event and podcasts of interviews (subtitled) related to the project will be uploaded onto the Disability History Scotland & Voices of War & Peace websites, where they will form part of the archive which we are currently designing. This will be managed by our current volunteers and project worker. All digital output on our website is free to access and download. • A high profile seminar on the theme of Justice Not Charity would be used to launch the publication and disseminate its findings to a diverse audience. • Volunteer researchers would gain new skills and participants would be given a certificate of recognition at the end of the project. • Possible ancillary output, aimed at an academic audience, might take the form of a co-authored conference paper and journal article for the likes of Scottish Labour History or Medical Humanities.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Justice, not Charity, Was Their Cry 
Organisation University of Glasgow
Department MRC Centre for Virus Research
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Academic Role and Responsibilities • To ensure the project meets agreed milestones and is delivered successfully. • To undertake the research plan, co-produced in partnership with Disability History Scotland. • To identify potential volunteer researchers from outside DHS. • To deliver training a training programme for volunteers, including: * undertaking research in newspaper archives. * presenting findings from old newspaper records. * assembling a catalogue of the sources located so that they may be used for subsequent interpretation and incorporation into a narrative. • To co-produce the research findings as a text for publication or other suitable output (e.g. blog posts, displays, podcasts). • To disseminate findings from the research, including a final report. • To ensure the link between both partners continues beyond this project.
Collaborator Contribution Community Partner Role and Responsibilities • To ensure the project meets agreed milestones and is delivered successfully. • To co-produce the research plan. • To provide project administration. • To identify and recruit volunteer researchers from DHS and the wider community. • To arrange volunteer training and support. • To co-produce the research findings as a text for publication. • To publish the research in accessible formats. • To disseminate findings from the research, including a final report. • To ensure the project is accessible to a wide and diverse audience via the DHS website and through a programme of outreach and community engagement. • To ensure the link between both partners continues beyond this project.
Impact • A co-authored publication by the partners (in a range of inclusive formats such as hard copy, electronic and easy read versions) setting out the march experience in its social, economic and political context, particularly from the perspective of the Scottish contingents therefore bringing their role to a Scottish audience. It would be written in compliance with academic rigour while being in a style accessible to a general audience. • A video of the launch event and podcasts of interviews (subtitled) related to the project will be uploaded onto the Disability History Scotland & Voices of War & Peace websites, where they will form part of the archive which we are currently designing. This will be managed by our current volunteers and project worker. All digital output on our website is free to access and download. • A high profile seminar on the theme of Justice Not Charity would be used to launch the publication and disseminate its findings to a diverse audience. • Volunteer researchers would gain new skills and participants would be given a certificate of recognition at the end of the project. • Possible ancillary output, aimed at an academic audience, might take the form of a co-authored conference paper and journal article for the likes of Scottish Labour History or Medical Humanities.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Minding Black Histories in War Times: Remembering, Acknowledging and Documenting Contributions of Black Poppies in WWI 
Organisation African Community Heritage Hub
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution BCMCR lead Dima Saber and RA (0.2FTE) were in charge of the following tasks: Liaising with staff coordinator at ACHH to ensure project delivery, including the design and organisation of all project events and activities including 'Community Development Day', 'Black Community Day' and the 'Minding Black Histories' art exhibition Documenting all project activities through social media networks to build public engagement and exposure, and through sustaining a project blog, hosted on the ACHH website which is currently being developed as part of their ongoing HLF project Supporting the hub to locate, identify and connect with descendants and relatives of 5 black WWI servicemen in Birmingham, in the UK and back home Supporting the hub to organise 3 photography and digital storytelling workshops targeting 5-7 of their young volunteers, and offer them advice and support as they document these black poppies stories Producing one co-authored refereed journal article which looks at processes of co-design and co-production in collaborative research Impact assessment and reporting to VoW & Peace coordinators
Collaborator Contribution The African Community Heritage Hub were in charge of the following tasks: Recruiting a part-time staff coordinator, and 57 young volunteers to take part in the ToT programme and in project activities Taking a lead role on public engagement activities, including the initial 'Community Development Day', the ToT training series and the end of the project 'Black Community Day' and 'Minding Black Histories' art exhibition Working with the research team to identify and connect with existing projects that focus on the contributions of black servicemen to the WWI British African Regiment and the British West Indian Regiment Liaising with an artistic partner to give 3 photography workshops and to put together the end of project art exhibition Working with the research team to identify, connect with and interview descendants and relatives of 5 black servicemen through its own community networks in Birmingham, in the UK and back home
Impact A project blog, hosted on the African Community Heritage Hub website sustained by the RA and used as a space to document the activities and main findings An initial report mapping out existing projects that document, archive and work on unveiling forgotten black contributions to the first WW Training resources on basic photography and digital storytelling techniques used in the ToT series One coauthored refereed article which documents processes of codesigning and implementing collaborative research projects Two main public engagement events, including an initial 'Community Development Day' and an end of project 'Black Community Day' and art exhibition
Start Year 2016
 
Description Minding Black Histories in War Times: Remembering, Acknowledging and Documenting Contributions of Black Poppies in WWI 
Organisation Birmingham City University
Department Centre for Critical Social Research
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution BCMCR lead Dima Saber and RA (0.2FTE) were in charge of the following tasks: Liaising with staff coordinator at ACHH to ensure project delivery, including the design and organisation of all project events and activities including 'Community Development Day', 'Black Community Day' and the 'Minding Black Histories' art exhibition Documenting all project activities through social media networks to build public engagement and exposure, and through sustaining a project blog, hosted on the ACHH website which is currently being developed as part of their ongoing HLF project Supporting the hub to locate, identify and connect with descendants and relatives of 5 black WWI servicemen in Birmingham, in the UK and back home Supporting the hub to organise 3 photography and digital storytelling workshops targeting 5-7 of their young volunteers, and offer them advice and support as they document these black poppies stories Producing one co-authored refereed journal article which looks at processes of co-design and co-production in collaborative research Impact assessment and reporting to VoW & Peace coordinators
Collaborator Contribution The African Community Heritage Hub were in charge of the following tasks: Recruiting a part-time staff coordinator, and 57 young volunteers to take part in the ToT programme and in project activities Taking a lead role on public engagement activities, including the initial 'Community Development Day', the ToT training series and the end of the project 'Black Community Day' and 'Minding Black Histories' art exhibition Working with the research team to identify and connect with existing projects that focus on the contributions of black servicemen to the WWI British African Regiment and the British West Indian Regiment Liaising with an artistic partner to give 3 photography workshops and to put together the end of project art exhibition Working with the research team to identify, connect with and interview descendants and relatives of 5 black servicemen through its own community networks in Birmingham, in the UK and back home
Impact A project blog, hosted on the African Community Heritage Hub website sustained by the RA and used as a space to document the activities and main findings An initial report mapping out existing projects that document, archive and work on unveiling forgotten black contributions to the first WW Training resources on basic photography and digital storytelling techniques used in the ToT series One coauthored refereed article which documents processes of codesigning and implementing collaborative research projects Two main public engagement events, including an initial 'Community Development Day' and an end of project 'Black Community Day' and art exhibition
Start Year 2016
 
Description Patriotism or Pragmatism: Children and Young People on the Rural Home Front in Worcestershire and Surrounding Areas 
Organisation University of Worcester
Department Institute of Humanities & Creative Arts
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution • Coordinate, design and manage the project, directly and through employing a heritage worker • Undertake research in regional and national archives such as Museum of Rural Life • Work with WHN Midlands region to organise conference in March / April on the West Midlands Home Front to enable community groups to attend, exhibit and exchange knowledge • Make links and work with other groups working on children and WW1 and organise a Symposium on Children and WW1: histories and engagements • Organise 3 study days and support materials for youth groups • Provide advice, support and materials in person or by email, responding to queries and questions within 5 days • Manage the funds to pay expenses of travel to training and events with external speakers • Co-ordinate and take responsibility for ensuring the research is undertaken and translated into an exhibition for the Hive • Edit the special edition of the Journal of War and Cultural Studies and write article on Children and engagement in WW1 as part of this.
Collaborator Contribution • Meet regularly with academic or heritage worker to report and discuss progress • Organise behind the scenes tours of the Hive for youth groups on study days • Participate in the exchange of local insight, information and contacts to facilitate research • Champion the project's activities within Worcestershire WW1 100, and ensure that all supporters and participants are informed of meetings, and opportunities to join in with activities and events.
Impact Outputs will include: • Exhibition at the Hive in November 2017 • Special edition of Journal of War and Culture Studies - jointly edited with Marcus Morris from Manchester Metropolitan University • Young people will have engaged with researching and communicating multiple histories of children in WW1 • Academics and community participants alike will have a greater awareness and richer understanding of the role played by children in rural Worcestershire and adjacent areas in WW1 • Further research and publication in both academic and community spheres will have been stimulated • PhD students, staff and undergraduates at University of Worcester will have developed greater understanding and experience of working with communities, public engagement and collaboratively produced research. • It will have increased public understanding of the impact of university research and activity
Start Year 2017
 
Description Patriotism or Pragmatism: Children and Young People on the Rural Home Front in Worcestershire and Surrounding Areas 
Organisation Worcestershire Archive and Archaeology Service
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution • Coordinate, design and manage the project, directly and through employing a heritage worker • Undertake research in regional and national archives such as Museum of Rural Life • Work with WHN Midlands region to organise conference in March / April on the West Midlands Home Front to enable community groups to attend, exhibit and exchange knowledge • Make links and work with other groups working on children and WW1 and organise a Symposium on Children and WW1: histories and engagements • Organise 3 study days and support materials for youth groups • Provide advice, support and materials in person or by email, responding to queries and questions within 5 days • Manage the funds to pay expenses of travel to training and events with external speakers • Co-ordinate and take responsibility for ensuring the research is undertaken and translated into an exhibition for the Hive • Edit the special edition of the Journal of War and Cultural Studies and write article on Children and engagement in WW1 as part of this.
Collaborator Contribution • Meet regularly with academic or heritage worker to report and discuss progress • Organise behind the scenes tours of the Hive for youth groups on study days • Participate in the exchange of local insight, information and contacts to facilitate research • Champion the project's activities within Worcestershire WW1 100, and ensure that all supporters and participants are informed of meetings, and opportunities to join in with activities and events.
Impact Outputs will include: • Exhibition at the Hive in November 2017 • Special edition of Journal of War and Culture Studies - jointly edited with Marcus Morris from Manchester Metropolitan University • Young people will have engaged with researching and communicating multiple histories of children in WW1 • Academics and community participants alike will have a greater awareness and richer understanding of the role played by children in rural Worcestershire and adjacent areas in WW1 • Further research and publication in both academic and community spheres will have been stimulated • PhD students, staff and undergraduates at University of Worcester will have developed greater understanding and experience of working with communities, public engagement and collaboratively produced research. • It will have increased public understanding of the impact of university research and activity
Start Year 2017
 
Description Patriotism or Pragmatism: Children and Young People on the Rural Home Front in Worcestershire and Surrounding Areas 
Organisation Worcestershire County Council
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution • Coordinate, design and manage the project, directly and through employing a heritage worker • Undertake research in regional and national archives such as Museum of Rural Life • Work with WHN Midlands region to organise conference in March / April on the West Midlands Home Front to enable community groups to attend, exhibit and exchange knowledge • Make links and work with other groups working on children and WW1 and organise a Symposium on Children and WW1: histories and engagements • Organise 3 study days and support materials for youth groups • Provide advice, support and materials in person or by email, responding to queries and questions within 5 days • Manage the funds to pay expenses of travel to training and events with external speakers • Co-ordinate and take responsibility for ensuring the research is undertaken and translated into an exhibition for the Hive • Edit the special edition of the Journal of War and Cultural Studies and write article on Children and engagement in WW1 as part of this.
Collaborator Contribution • Meet regularly with academic or heritage worker to report and discuss progress • Organise behind the scenes tours of the Hive for youth groups on study days • Participate in the exchange of local insight, information and contacts to facilitate research • Champion the project's activities within Worcestershire WW1 100, and ensure that all supporters and participants are informed of meetings, and opportunities to join in with activities and events.
Impact Outputs will include: • Exhibition at the Hive in November 2017 • Special edition of Journal of War and Culture Studies - jointly edited with Marcus Morris from Manchester Metropolitan University • Young people will have engaged with researching and communicating multiple histories of children in WW1 • Academics and community participants alike will have a greater awareness and richer understanding of the role played by children in rural Worcestershire and adjacent areas in WW1 • Further research and publication in both academic and community spheres will have been stimulated • PhD students, staff and undergraduates at University of Worcester will have developed greater understanding and experience of working with communities, public engagement and collaboratively produced research. • It will have increased public understanding of the impact of university research and activity
Start Year 2017
 
Description Refugee Tales: viewing the Belgian refugee crisis of WW1 through the lens of contemporary experience 
Organisation Manchester Metropolitan University
Department Department of History, Politics and Philosophy
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Professor Stephen Dixon (MMU), as lead applicant, will carry overall responsibility for delivery of all aspects of the project; finalising the schedule of events and details of the workshop programme; curating the exhibition; liaising between all project participants; organising the research days, and monitoring the progress of the project. Additionally he will co-deliver the ceramic workshops at MSA and lead on the installation for BCB. Johnny Magee (MMU) will be responsible for recording the progress and outcomes of the project through the production of film and photographic documentation, and producing digital resources for TCF and MSA websites. Elle Simms (MMU) will support the research days at MSA and the Staffordshire County Archives, and lead the participants in practical ceramic workshops at Manchester School of Art, where they will incorporate their research findings into their own individual ceramic artworks and into a collaborative ceramic installation. Paul Anderton (Independent Historian) will provide the historical perspective to the project, through his expertise and extensive research on Belgian Refugees in WW1. He will support the research days at MSA and the Staffordshire County Archives, and contribute to the historical/contextual element of the exhibition at BCB.
Collaborator Contribution Barney Hare-Duke (The Clay Foundation) will be responsible for managing and overseeing the Clay Foundation's contribution to the project. Along with Katie Leonard he will facilitate the participants' familiarization with the concept of public engagement by organizing their participation in a ceramic installation/artwork at the BCB 2017. Katie Leonard (The Clay Foundation) will be responsible for the recruitment of the project participants from the Jubilee Project and Sanctus group through The Clay Foundation's community outreach programme in Stoke-on-Trent. Leonard will also ensure the lasting legacy of the project through the creation of digital resources for the Clay Foundation website and development of a continued professional development (CPD) programme for teachers Jo Ayre (The Clay Foundation) will support the participants in the practical ceramic workshops at TCF, and will contribute to the development and installation of the exhibition at BCB 2017.
Impact Deliverables • A structured training programme delivering skills in the use of archival materials, research, creative ceramic practice and public engagement for a group of 15-20 refugees and asylum seekers. • A collection of ceramic artefacts, printed ceramics and a collaborative artwork to be exhibited at the British Ceramics Biennial (September 23 to November 12, 2017) • Contextual and critical writing, co-authored by the academic partners and outlining the research findings, which will be disseminated on-line. • A series of digital resources will be made available as downloads from TCF website for the use of education settings and schools, including an archival research resource pack, a documentary video, and newly discovered WW1 archive material. • A continued professional development (CPD) programme for teachers will be developed, and will be offered to school teachers at twilight/staff meetings led by TCF and MSA. Outcomes For the audience: • Through the viewing of applied research, an increased public insight into the experiences of contemporary refugees. • Raised public awareness of the currently under-researched experiences of Belgian Refugees in the First World War. • A greater understanding of the commemorative, narrative and emotive potential of ceramic artefacts. For the participants: • The participants themselves will directly benefit from a deeper understanding of refugees in the First World War through their personal research and the experience of reflection and remembrance. • Participants will gain practical skills in conducting historical research, using archive materials, ceramic practice and working as co-researchers and collaborative creative practitioners. For the partners: • Experience of co-creation and co-delivery for the partners will further develop their knowledge and skills across academic, educational and community settings. • On-going partnerships between the participating organisations will be strengthened. • Potential REF outputs for MSA staff members.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Refugee Tales: viewing the Belgian refugee crisis of WW1 through the lens of contemporary experience 
Organisation The Clay Foundation
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Professor Stephen Dixon (MMU), as lead applicant, will carry overall responsibility for delivery of all aspects of the project; finalising the schedule of events and details of the workshop programme; curating the exhibition; liaising between all project participants; organising the research days, and monitoring the progress of the project. Additionally he will co-deliver the ceramic workshops at MSA and lead on the installation for BCB. Johnny Magee (MMU) will be responsible for recording the progress and outcomes of the project through the production of film and photographic documentation, and producing digital resources for TCF and MSA websites. Elle Simms (MMU) will support the research days at MSA and the Staffordshire County Archives, and lead the participants in practical ceramic workshops at Manchester School of Art, where they will incorporate their research findings into their own individual ceramic artworks and into a collaborative ceramic installation. Paul Anderton (Independent Historian) will provide the historical perspective to the project, through his expertise and extensive research on Belgian Refugees in WW1. He will support the research days at MSA and the Staffordshire County Archives, and contribute to the historical/contextual element of the exhibition at BCB.
Collaborator Contribution Barney Hare-Duke (The Clay Foundation) will be responsible for managing and overseeing the Clay Foundation's contribution to the project. Along with Katie Leonard he will facilitate the participants' familiarization with the concept of public engagement by organizing their participation in a ceramic installation/artwork at the BCB 2017. Katie Leonard (The Clay Foundation) will be responsible for the recruitment of the project participants from the Jubilee Project and Sanctus group through The Clay Foundation's community outreach programme in Stoke-on-Trent. Leonard will also ensure the lasting legacy of the project through the creation of digital resources for the Clay Foundation website and development of a continued professional development (CPD) programme for teachers Jo Ayre (The Clay Foundation) will support the participants in the practical ceramic workshops at TCF, and will contribute to the development and installation of the exhibition at BCB 2017.
Impact Deliverables • A structured training programme delivering skills in the use of archival materials, research, creative ceramic practice and public engagement for a group of 15-20 refugees and asylum seekers. • A collection of ceramic artefacts, printed ceramics and a collaborative artwork to be exhibited at the British Ceramics Biennial (September 23 to November 12, 2017) • Contextual and critical writing, co-authored by the academic partners and outlining the research findings, which will be disseminated on-line. • A series of digital resources will be made available as downloads from TCF website for the use of education settings and schools, including an archival research resource pack, a documentary video, and newly discovered WW1 archive material. • A continued professional development (CPD) programme for teachers will be developed, and will be offered to school teachers at twilight/staff meetings led by TCF and MSA. Outcomes For the audience: • Through the viewing of applied research, an increased public insight into the experiences of contemporary refugees. • Raised public awareness of the currently under-researched experiences of Belgian Refugees in the First World War. • A greater understanding of the commemorative, narrative and emotive potential of ceramic artefacts. For the participants: • The participants themselves will directly benefit from a deeper understanding of refugees in the First World War through their personal research and the experience of reflection and remembrance. • Participants will gain practical skills in conducting historical research, using archive materials, ceramic practice and working as co-researchers and collaborative creative practitioners. For the partners: • Experience of co-creation and co-delivery for the partners will further develop their knowledge and skills across academic, educational and community settings. • On-going partnerships between the participating organisations will be strengthened. • Potential REF outputs for MSA staff members.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Running Between the Lines 
Organisation Birchfield Harriers
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The lead academic is an experienced researcher in the field of sports history and culture. He guided Birchfield Harriers through their previous research and was able to help them to develop the research into a Birmingham wide project. The lead-researcher was responsible for the overall direction and organisation of the project.
Collaborator Contribution Birchfield Harriers made contact with the other sports clubs from the Birmingham area. Arising from this initial contact a meeting at the Alexander Stadium was convened with the aim of establishing a steering group drawn from all interested parties. This body had overall responsibility for the day-to-day running of the project, ensuring that all parties were integrated into the overall development of the project.
Impact An exhibition of photographs, memorabilia and oral testimony shown at Alexander Stadium, Perry Barr, Birmingham. The exhibition will be offered to other clubs involved in the project, Birmingham city library, the University of Birmingham (who have an extensive athletics' archive) and other interested parties. A one-day symposium which included academics, sport clubs and other interested parties. A paper will be presented to the British Society of Sports Historians Conference by the research team but led by the lead-researcher. The lead-researcher will write an article to be submitted to a sport related academic journal such as Sport in History. All findings of the project to be uploaded to the project web site and made permanently available to the general public.
Start Year 2016
 
Description Running Between the Lines 
Organisation University of Central Lancashire
Department Jeremiah Horrocks Institute for Mathematics, Physics and Astronomy
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The lead academic is an experienced researcher in the field of sports history and culture. He guided Birchfield Harriers through their previous research and was able to help them to develop the research into a Birmingham wide project. The lead-researcher was responsible for the overall direction and organisation of the project.
Collaborator Contribution Birchfield Harriers made contact with the other sports clubs from the Birmingham area. Arising from this initial contact a meeting at the Alexander Stadium was convened with the aim of establishing a steering group drawn from all interested parties. This body had overall responsibility for the day-to-day running of the project, ensuring that all parties were integrated into the overall development of the project.
Impact An exhibition of photographs, memorabilia and oral testimony shown at Alexander Stadium, Perry Barr, Birmingham. The exhibition will be offered to other clubs involved in the project, Birmingham city library, the University of Birmingham (who have an extensive athletics' archive) and other interested parties. A one-day symposium which included academics, sport clubs and other interested parties. A paper will be presented to the British Society of Sports Historians Conference by the research team but led by the lead-researcher. The lead-researcher will write an article to be submitted to a sport related academic journal such as Sport in History. All findings of the project to be uploaded to the project web site and made permanently available to the general public.
Start Year 2016
 
Description Stories of Omission: Conflict and the experience of Black soldiers 
Organisation Recognize Black Heritage & Culture CIC
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Prof Ian Grosvenor will oversee the project and act as a mentor and critical friend throughout the duration of the project. He will meet with the other partners on a regular basis to offer advice and support. Dr Nicola Gauld will act as research facilitator and will be responsible for supporting delivery of all aspects of the project, including programming events and workshops, organising research trips and access to archives, monitoring the progress of the project and carrying out evaluation.
Collaborator Contribution Recognize will act as community facilitator and will be responsible for project management and delivery of all aspects of the project, including recruiting volunteers from his existing network of contacts, organising events and workshops, liaising between project participants and contributing to evaluation.
Impact Training programme - archive research, interrogating sources, critical thinking and practical skills Co-authored article outlining the research findings A series of blogs by members of project team & volunteers (to be hosted on Voices and Recognize websites) A learning resource (to be available on both websites), taking the form of display panels and booklet Raised public awareness of the under-researched area of commemoration and non-commemoration of Black soldiers Ongoing partnership will be strengthened Experience of co-design and co-delivery
Start Year 2017
 
Description Stories of Omission: Conflict and the experience of Black soldiers 
Organisation University of Birmingham
Department School of History and Cultures
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Prof Ian Grosvenor will oversee the project and act as a mentor and critical friend throughout the duration of the project. He will meet with the other partners on a regular basis to offer advice and support. Dr Nicola Gauld will act as research facilitator and will be responsible for supporting delivery of all aspects of the project, including programming events and workshops, organising research trips and access to archives, monitoring the progress of the project and carrying out evaluation.
Collaborator Contribution Recognize will act as community facilitator and will be responsible for project management and delivery of all aspects of the project, including recruiting volunteers from his existing network of contacts, organising events and workshops, liaising between project participants and contributing to evaluation.
Impact Training programme - archive research, interrogating sources, critical thinking and practical skills Co-authored article outlining the research findings A series of blogs by members of project team & volunteers (to be hosted on Voices and Recognize websites) A learning resource (to be available on both websites), taking the form of display panels and booklet Raised public awareness of the under-researched area of commemoration and non-commemoration of Black soldiers Ongoing partnership will be strengthened Experience of co-design and co-delivery
Start Year 2017
 
Description The Dusty's First World War Project 
Organisation Action in Caerau and Ely (ACE)
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Dave Wyatt co-ordinates community engagement in SHARE and is CAER PI (see above). Dave is Project PI and will provide strategic management of all aspects of the Dusty's WW1 project. Stephanie Ward is a researcher with expertise in social, political and cultural aspects of Britain's history c.1914-39. She will provide research guidance and engage with community participants in co-produced research activities, including the collection of oral histories within community and archival contexts. She will also produce an academic article arising from the project. Dan Jewson: a recently graduated mature student who will co-ordinate the Dusty's WW1 Project based half-time in the university and half-time in the community at ACE. Dan's role will be to nurture existing links, develop partnerships and educational opportunities and facilitate the co-production of project research, delivery of outcomes and project evaluation in collaboration with an HLF funded art project instigated by ACE.
Collaborator Contribution Action in Caerau and Ely: is a community-based organisation that aims to support the social, economic and environmental regeneration. ACE staff will provide access to a network of local community groups enabling the involvement of local residents in the project and incorporating these activities into the Ely and Caerau Timebank initiative. ACE will also provide use of key venues, including the Dusty Forge. People Around Here: is a community arts charity that aims to educate and inspire communities through participative arts experiences. With a track record of engaging heritage 'young roots' projects, they are based at the Dusty Forge and deliver regular art workshops with the local community. People Around Here will provide a professional community artist to work with participants to co-produce a creative display of research as a portable exhibition, and a co-produced mural on the outside of the Dusty Forge. Western Federation Schools: A close partnership has been established with the Western Federation secondary schools. These schools (now located in a single location) have participated in a wide range of CAER activities including: excavation, geophysics and artwork. The schools have previously embedded aspects of CAER's local heritage research into the curriculum and will facilitate pupil involvement, providing teaching support and expertise.
Impact Community participants and schoolchildren will have experienced opportunities for training/educational development inculcating a range of skills (communication, team building, analysis, literacy and numeracy, ICT etc.) through co-production of research and heritage interpretation working alongside academics, heritage professionals, archivists and community artists. Community participants and schoolchildren will have a greater understanding of and investment in their local First World War history and heritage environment including not only the iconic Dusty Forge building and the striking monuments of the commonwealth war graves in Western cemetery but also of the houses and streets in which they live. Community participants and schoolchildren will co-produce a portable exhibition with professional academics which will displayed at the Glamorgan Archive before being located permanently within the Our Place: Dusty Forge community centre. Community participants, schoolchildren, community development workers, artists and academics will produce blog entries about the Dusty's WW1 project for the popular CAER Heritage blog; project findings will be integrated into the digital resources for the CAER Heritage HEART of Cardiff Heritage trails. Community participants will work with a professional artist from People Around Here to co-produce an attractive heritage themed mural art installation to adorn the outside of the Our Place: Dusty Forge community centre showcasing research from the project. The co-produced research and strategies employed on the Dusty's WW1 project will act as a pilot contributing towards the development of a major HLF Heritage Grant application to sustain the CAER Project initiatives, including further co-research on Ely and Caerau's social housing estates, over the next five years.
Start Year 2016
 
Description The Lost Boys: remembering the boy soldiers of the First World War through ceramics 
Organisation Manchester Metropolitan University
Department Manchester School of Art
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Professor Stephen Dixon (MMU), as lead applicant, carried overall responsibility for delivery of all aspects of the project; including finalising the schedule of events and details of the workshop programme; curating the exhibitions; liaising between all project participants; organising the research days, and monitoring the progress of the project. Additionally he delivered the ceramic printing workshop at MSA. Professor Melanie Tebbutt (MMU) provided the historical perspective and critical context to the project, through her expertise in young people's experience of WW1. She supported the research days at the Staffordshire Regimental Museum and the Staffordshire County Archives. She will additionally assist Professor Dixon in project management and overview. Johnny Magee (MMU) held responsibility for recording the progress and outcomes of the project through the production of film and photographic documentation, and producing digital resources for TCF and MSA websites. Jenny Walker and Elle Simms (MMU) supported the research days at the Staffordshire Regimental Museum and the Staffordshire County Archives, and led the participants in practical ceramic workshops at Manchester School of Art, using their research findings to produce their own individual commemorative ceramic artworks
Collaborator Contribution Barney Hare-Duke (The Clay Foundation) was responsible for managing and overseeing the Clay Foundation's contribution to the project. Along with Katie Leonard he facilitated the participants' familiarization with the concept of public engagement by organizing their participation in an ongoing ceramic installation at the British Ceramics Biennial 2015. Katie Leonard (The Clay Foundation) was responsible for the recruitment of the project participants through The Clay Foundation's community outreach programme in secondary schools and FE colleges in Stoke-on-Trent. Leonard also ensured the lasting legacy of the project through the creation of digital resources and the delivery of a continued professional development (CPD) programme for teachers. Chris Copp (Staffordshire Museums Consortium) was responsible for facilitating access to the collections and archives of the member museums of the Staffordshire Museum Consortium and supported the research days at the Staffordshire County Archives.
Impact Deliverables • A structured training programme delivering skills in the use of archival materials, research, creative ceramic practice and public engagement for a group of young people. • An exhibition of the work produced in the print workshop will be exhibited in the Holden Gallery at the Manchester School of Art. This preliminary exhibition will coincide with the Voices of War and Peace conference Being Young During World War One: Effects, Legacy and Remembering (November 5 - November 11, 2015) http://www.holdengallery.mmu.ac.uk/ • The final collection of ceramic artefacts and printed ceramics will be exhibited at the National Memorial Arboretum (also in Staffordshire) in March 2016 http://www.thenma.org.uk/ • A paper co-authored by the academic partners, and outlining research findings (both historical and practice-based), will be written and submitted to appropriate journals. • A series of digital resources will be made available as downloads from TCF and MSA websites for the use of education settings and schools, including an archival research resource pack, a demonstration video, and new WW1 archive material from the Staffordshire Regiment Museum. Link to film: https://vimeo.com/170710735 • A continued professional development (CPD) programme for teachers will be developed, and will be offered to school teachers at twilight/staff meetings led by TCF and MSA. Outcomes • Raised public awareness of the currently under-acknowledged contribution made by boy soldiers in the First World War. • Through the archival research, an increased and detailed knowledge of the experiences of the soldiers. • A greater understanding of the commemorative potential of ceramic artefacts. • The young people participating will directly benefit from a deeper understanding of the First World War through their personal research and the experience of reflection and remembrance. They will gain practical skills in conducting historical research, using archive materials, ceramic practice and working as co-researchers and collaborative creative practitioners. • The presence of the exhibition in the Holden Gallery in conjunction with the Voices of War and Peace conference will highlight the project and trigger potentially fruitful contributions from the specialist delegates. • Experience of co-creation and co-delivery for all the collaborating partners developing knowledge and skills in both the academic and community settings. • On-going partnerships between the participating organisations.
Start Year 2016
 
Description The Lost Boys: remembering the boy soldiers of the First World War through ceramics 
Organisation Staffordshire Borough Council
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Professor Stephen Dixon (MMU), as lead applicant, carried overall responsibility for delivery of all aspects of the project; including finalising the schedule of events and details of the workshop programme; curating the exhibitions; liaising between all project participants; organising the research days, and monitoring the progress of the project. Additionally he delivered the ceramic printing workshop at MSA. Professor Melanie Tebbutt (MMU) provided the historical perspective and critical context to the project, through her expertise in young people's experience of WW1. She supported the research days at the Staffordshire Regimental Museum and the Staffordshire County Archives. She will additionally assist Professor Dixon in project management and overview. Johnny Magee (MMU) held responsibility for recording the progress and outcomes of the project through the production of film and photographic documentation, and producing digital resources for TCF and MSA websites. Jenny Walker and Elle Simms (MMU) supported the research days at the Staffordshire Regimental Museum and the Staffordshire County Archives, and led the participants in practical ceramic workshops at Manchester School of Art, using their research findings to produce their own individual commemorative ceramic artworks
Collaborator Contribution Barney Hare-Duke (The Clay Foundation) was responsible for managing and overseeing the Clay Foundation's contribution to the project. Along with Katie Leonard he facilitated the participants' familiarization with the concept of public engagement by organizing their participation in an ongoing ceramic installation at the British Ceramics Biennial 2015. Katie Leonard (The Clay Foundation) was responsible for the recruitment of the project participants through The Clay Foundation's community outreach programme in secondary schools and FE colleges in Stoke-on-Trent. Leonard also ensured the lasting legacy of the project through the creation of digital resources and the delivery of a continued professional development (CPD) programme for teachers. Chris Copp (Staffordshire Museums Consortium) was responsible for facilitating access to the collections and archives of the member museums of the Staffordshire Museum Consortium and supported the research days at the Staffordshire County Archives.
Impact Deliverables • A structured training programme delivering skills in the use of archival materials, research, creative ceramic practice and public engagement for a group of young people. • An exhibition of the work produced in the print workshop will be exhibited in the Holden Gallery at the Manchester School of Art. This preliminary exhibition will coincide with the Voices of War and Peace conference Being Young During World War One: Effects, Legacy and Remembering (November 5 - November 11, 2015) http://www.holdengallery.mmu.ac.uk/ • The final collection of ceramic artefacts and printed ceramics will be exhibited at the National Memorial Arboretum (also in Staffordshire) in March 2016 http://www.thenma.org.uk/ • A paper co-authored by the academic partners, and outlining research findings (both historical and practice-based), will be written and submitted to appropriate journals. • A series of digital resources will be made available as downloads from TCF and MSA websites for the use of education settings and schools, including an archival research resource pack, a demonstration video, and new WW1 archive material from the Staffordshire Regiment Museum. Link to film: https://vimeo.com/170710735 • A continued professional development (CPD) programme for teachers will be developed, and will be offered to school teachers at twilight/staff meetings led by TCF and MSA. Outcomes • Raised public awareness of the currently under-acknowledged contribution made by boy soldiers in the First World War. • Through the archival research, an increased and detailed knowledge of the experiences of the soldiers. • A greater understanding of the commemorative potential of ceramic artefacts. • The young people participating will directly benefit from a deeper understanding of the First World War through their personal research and the experience of reflection and remembrance. They will gain practical skills in conducting historical research, using archive materials, ceramic practice and working as co-researchers and collaborative creative practitioners. • The presence of the exhibition in the Holden Gallery in conjunction with the Voices of War and Peace conference will highlight the project and trigger potentially fruitful contributions from the specialist delegates. • Experience of co-creation and co-delivery for all the collaborating partners developing knowledge and skills in both the academic and community settings. • On-going partnerships between the participating organisations.
Start Year 2016
 
Description The Lost Boys: remembering the boy soldiers of the First World War through ceramics 
Organisation The Clay Foundation
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Professor Stephen Dixon (MMU), as lead applicant, carried overall responsibility for delivery of all aspects of the project; including finalising the schedule of events and details of the workshop programme; curating the exhibitions; liaising between all project participants; organising the research days, and monitoring the progress of the project. Additionally he delivered the ceramic printing workshop at MSA. Professor Melanie Tebbutt (MMU) provided the historical perspective and critical context to the project, through her expertise in young people's experience of WW1. She supported the research days at the Staffordshire Regimental Museum and the Staffordshire County Archives. She will additionally assist Professor Dixon in project management and overview. Johnny Magee (MMU) held responsibility for recording the progress and outcomes of the project through the production of film and photographic documentation, and producing digital resources for TCF and MSA websites. Jenny Walker and Elle Simms (MMU) supported the research days at the Staffordshire Regimental Museum and the Staffordshire County Archives, and led the participants in practical ceramic workshops at Manchester School of Art, using their research findings to produce their own individual commemorative ceramic artworks
Collaborator Contribution Barney Hare-Duke (The Clay Foundation) was responsible for managing and overseeing the Clay Foundation's contribution to the project. Along with Katie Leonard he facilitated the participants' familiarization with the concept of public engagement by organizing their participation in an ongoing ceramic installation at the British Ceramics Biennial 2015. Katie Leonard (The Clay Foundation) was responsible for the recruitment of the project participants through The Clay Foundation's community outreach programme in secondary schools and FE colleges in Stoke-on-Trent. Leonard also ensured the lasting legacy of the project through the creation of digital resources and the delivery of a continued professional development (CPD) programme for teachers. Chris Copp (Staffordshire Museums Consortium) was responsible for facilitating access to the collections and archives of the member museums of the Staffordshire Museum Consortium and supported the research days at the Staffordshire County Archives.
Impact Deliverables • A structured training programme delivering skills in the use of archival materials, research, creative ceramic practice and public engagement for a group of young people. • An exhibition of the work produced in the print workshop will be exhibited in the Holden Gallery at the Manchester School of Art. This preliminary exhibition will coincide with the Voices of War and Peace conference Being Young During World War One: Effects, Legacy and Remembering (November 5 - November 11, 2015) http://www.holdengallery.mmu.ac.uk/ • The final collection of ceramic artefacts and printed ceramics will be exhibited at the National Memorial Arboretum (also in Staffordshire) in March 2016 http://www.thenma.org.uk/ • A paper co-authored by the academic partners, and outlining research findings (both historical and practice-based), will be written and submitted to appropriate journals. • A series of digital resources will be made available as downloads from TCF and MSA websites for the use of education settings and schools, including an archival research resource pack, a demonstration video, and new WW1 archive material from the Staffordshire Regiment Museum. Link to film: https://vimeo.com/170710735 • A continued professional development (CPD) programme for teachers will be developed, and will be offered to school teachers at twilight/staff meetings led by TCF and MSA. Outcomes • Raised public awareness of the currently under-acknowledged contribution made by boy soldiers in the First World War. • Through the archival research, an increased and detailed knowledge of the experiences of the soldiers. • A greater understanding of the commemorative potential of ceramic artefacts. • The young people participating will directly benefit from a deeper understanding of the First World War through their personal research and the experience of reflection and remembrance. They will gain practical skills in conducting historical research, using archive materials, ceramic practice and working as co-researchers and collaborative creative practitioners. • The presence of the exhibition in the Holden Gallery in conjunction with the Voices of War and Peace conference will highlight the project and trigger potentially fruitful contributions from the specialist delegates. • Experience of co-creation and co-delivery for all the collaborating partners developing knowledge and skills in both the academic and community settings. • On-going partnerships between the participating organisations.
Start Year 2016
 
Description The Women's Peace Crusade 1917-1918 in the North West 
Organisation Clapham Film Unit
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution This project aims to bring the largely forgotten Women's Peace Crusade back into the histories of the industrial towns of the North West. Local volunteer researchers will be recruited through Manchester Archives + and the Manchester Centre for Regional History's networks of local history enthusiasts. The volunteers will be trained to use the archives, undertake historical research and to write up the findings. This project will work with volunteer researchers, in collaboration with Manchester Archives + and the Manchester Centre for Regional History at Manchester Metropolitan University, using local archives, minute books, local directories, and newspapers in order to trace and track local women who were involved in the Crusade in Burnley, Bolton, Oldham, Blackburn, Nelson and Manchester. Using the new research gathered, this project will ? co-produce a short booklet featuring the stories of the women involved in the Crusades from each of the six towns. ? create a touring exhibition to showcase the research and complement the booklet ? make a scripted documentary that will recreate the local Crusades and will involve local schoolchildren and the research volunteers. ? give talks to the public, local community groups, and schools. The project will substantially develop the knowledge and skills of both academic and community partners and will have a real and discernible impact on people, heritage and communities in the North West. It will challenge stereotypes about women in WW1 who are generally represented in the historiography as nurses, munitions workers or land girls.
Collaborator Contribution Clapham Film Unit Each project by Clapham Film Unit has reached out into the community. We have worked with a wide range of people from refugees, older people, young people, graffiti artists and peace activists. We believe film is a great way to tell a story. The film for this project will be a scripted recreation of the Women's Peace Crusade using archive material and footage. We will engage members of the community who do not usually engage with heritage to take part in the reenactment. They will spread the finished film through their social media networks enabling us to tell the story to much wider range of people than we would otherwise reach. There will be a booklet, written by the local researchers, that relates to each town in Lancashire and Greater Manchester and that will be available alongside a touring exhibition about the WPC which will visit each town where the Crusade happened. Clapham Film Unit believes passionately in engaging academics with the community to ex-change ideas, inspiration and research, to investigate and celebrate lost histories. Manchester Archives + Manchester Central Library reopened in March 2014 and has welcomed 1.4 million visitors in its first year. The Archives+ exhibition has proved popular in its first year. For example: • Approximately 70% of Central Library visitors have visited the Archives+ exhibition. • North West Film Archive and BFI Mediatheque film viewing pods: 8,800 sessions and 37,500 films viewed. • Postcard interactive (where you can email a friend a historic postcard): 5,840 postcards sent. • 25% of visitors to Central Library are from outside the North West. • 90% of young people find Central Library 'young people' friendly.
Impact Outcomes for Participants: ? An opportunity to explore the little known histories of the First World War and the anti-war movement in North West England while contextualizing these histories in the heritage, culture and memory of key Lancashire industrial towns. ? Increase in skills and capacity of the volunteer researchers in the archives - measured by the number of volunteers and the feedback relating to the development of new knowledge, confidence ? Enjoyable and satisfying experience for all project participants ? Breaking barriers between academic and community historians Outcomes for Wider Community ? Opportunity to learn about the Women's Crusade via the project outputs o booklet o touring exhibition o a short film - link here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pKRUdeNJVA8 o public talks and presentations o online blogs and platforms (e.g. GM1914 www.gm1914.wordpress.com) ? The Women's Peace Crusade will become widely known outside of archive and academic circles through online sharing of the documentary via social media by the volunteers. ? The Women's Peace Crusade project will present an alternative narrative, alongside all the War commemoration reminding participants and audiences that there have always been massive protests against military action. The project will include local stories of women in the narratives of First World War. Outcomes for Project Team and Academic Community: ? Opportunity to learn from continuous evaluation about the theoretical understanding and the practice of co-produced research and outputs ? Recognition of the complex range of skills and knowledges held within a community/academic partnership project ? Exploration of the different ways to "do research" and its implication for public engagement ? Sharing of project research with academic community through ? a peer-reviewed, open-access academic article ? reflective project review about the projects; approach and methodology
Start Year 2016
 
Description The Women's Peace Crusade 1917-1918 in the North West 
Organisation Manchester City Council
Department Manchester Central Library
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution This project aims to bring the largely forgotten Women's Peace Crusade back into the histories of the industrial towns of the North West. Local volunteer researchers will be recruited through Manchester Archives + and the Manchester Centre for Regional History's networks of local history enthusiasts. The volunteers will be trained to use the archives, undertake historical research and to write up the findings. This project will work with volunteer researchers, in collaboration with Manchester Archives + and the Manchester Centre for Regional History at Manchester Metropolitan University, using local archives, minute books, local directories, and newspapers in order to trace and track local women who were involved in the Crusade in Burnley, Bolton, Oldham, Blackburn, Nelson and Manchester. Using the new research gathered, this project will ? co-produce a short booklet featuring the stories of the women involved in the Crusades from each of the six towns. ? create a touring exhibition to showcase the research and complement the booklet ? make a scripted documentary that will recreate the local Crusades and will involve local schoolchildren and the research volunteers. ? give talks to the public, local community groups, and schools. The project will substantially develop the knowledge and skills of both academic and community partners and will have a real and discernible impact on people, heritage and communities in the North West. It will challenge stereotypes about women in WW1 who are generally represented in the historiography as nurses, munitions workers or land girls.
Collaborator Contribution Clapham Film Unit Each project by Clapham Film Unit has reached out into the community. We have worked with a wide range of people from refugees, older people, young people, graffiti artists and peace activists. We believe film is a great way to tell a story. The film for this project will be a scripted recreation of the Women's Peace Crusade using archive material and footage. We will engage members of the community who do not usually engage with heritage to take part in the reenactment. They will spread the finished film through their social media networks enabling us to tell the story to much wider range of people than we would otherwise reach. There will be a booklet, written by the local researchers, that relates to each town in Lancashire and Greater Manchester and that will be available alongside a touring exhibition about the WPC which will visit each town where the Crusade happened. Clapham Film Unit believes passionately in engaging academics with the community to ex-change ideas, inspiration and research, to investigate and celebrate lost histories. Manchester Archives + Manchester Central Library reopened in March 2014 and has welcomed 1.4 million visitors in its first year. The Archives+ exhibition has proved popular in its first year. For example: • Approximately 70% of Central Library visitors have visited the Archives+ exhibition. • North West Film Archive and BFI Mediatheque film viewing pods: 8,800 sessions and 37,500 films viewed. • Postcard interactive (where you can email a friend a historic postcard): 5,840 postcards sent. • 25% of visitors to Central Library are from outside the North West. • 90% of young people find Central Library 'young people' friendly.
Impact Outcomes for Participants: ? An opportunity to explore the little known histories of the First World War and the anti-war movement in North West England while contextualizing these histories in the heritage, culture and memory of key Lancashire industrial towns. ? Increase in skills and capacity of the volunteer researchers in the archives - measured by the number of volunteers and the feedback relating to the development of new knowledge, confidence ? Enjoyable and satisfying experience for all project participants ? Breaking barriers between academic and community historians Outcomes for Wider Community ? Opportunity to learn about the Women's Crusade via the project outputs o booklet o touring exhibition o a short film - link here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pKRUdeNJVA8 o public talks and presentations o online blogs and platforms (e.g. GM1914 www.gm1914.wordpress.com) ? The Women's Peace Crusade will become widely known outside of archive and academic circles through online sharing of the documentary via social media by the volunteers. ? The Women's Peace Crusade project will present an alternative narrative, alongside all the War commemoration reminding participants and audiences that there have always been massive protests against military action. The project will include local stories of women in the narratives of First World War. Outcomes for Project Team and Academic Community: ? Opportunity to learn from continuous evaluation about the theoretical understanding and the practice of co-produced research and outputs ? Recognition of the complex range of skills and knowledges held within a community/academic partnership project ? Exploration of the different ways to "do research" and its implication for public engagement ? Sharing of project research with academic community through ? a peer-reviewed, open-access academic article ? reflective project review about the projects; approach and methodology
Start Year 2016
 
Description The Women's Peace Crusade 1917-1918 in the North West 
Organisation Manchester Metropolitan University
Department Manchester School of Art
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This project aims to bring the largely forgotten Women's Peace Crusade back into the histories of the industrial towns of the North West. Local volunteer researchers will be recruited through Manchester Archives + and the Manchester Centre for Regional History's networks of local history enthusiasts. The volunteers will be trained to use the archives, undertake historical research and to write up the findings. This project will work with volunteer researchers, in collaboration with Manchester Archives + and the Manchester Centre for Regional History at Manchester Metropolitan University, using local archives, minute books, local directories, and newspapers in order to trace and track local women who were involved in the Crusade in Burnley, Bolton, Oldham, Blackburn, Nelson and Manchester. Using the new research gathered, this project will ? co-produce a short booklet featuring the stories of the women involved in the Crusades from each of the six towns. ? create a touring exhibition to showcase the research and complement the booklet ? make a scripted documentary that will recreate the local Crusades and will involve local schoolchildren and the research volunteers. ? give talks to the public, local community groups, and schools. The project will substantially develop the knowledge and skills of both academic and community partners and will have a real and discernible impact on people, heritage and communities in the North West. It will challenge stereotypes about women in WW1 who are generally represented in the historiography as nurses, munitions workers or land girls.
Collaborator Contribution Clapham Film Unit Each project by Clapham Film Unit has reached out into the community. We have worked with a wide range of people from refugees, older people, young people, graffiti artists and peace activists. We believe film is a great way to tell a story. The film for this project will be a scripted recreation of the Women's Peace Crusade using archive material and footage. We will engage members of the community who do not usually engage with heritage to take part in the reenactment. They will spread the finished film through their social media networks enabling us to tell the story to much wider range of people than we would otherwise reach. There will be a booklet, written by the local researchers, that relates to each town in Lancashire and Greater Manchester and that will be available alongside a touring exhibition about the WPC which will visit each town where the Crusade happened. Clapham Film Unit believes passionately in engaging academics with the community to ex-change ideas, inspiration and research, to investigate and celebrate lost histories. Manchester Archives + Manchester Central Library reopened in March 2014 and has welcomed 1.4 million visitors in its first year. The Archives+ exhibition has proved popular in its first year. For example: • Approximately 70% of Central Library visitors have visited the Archives+ exhibition. • North West Film Archive and BFI Mediatheque film viewing pods: 8,800 sessions and 37,500 films viewed. • Postcard interactive (where you can email a friend a historic postcard): 5,840 postcards sent. • 25% of visitors to Central Library are from outside the North West. • 90% of young people find Central Library 'young people' friendly.
Impact Outcomes for Participants: ? An opportunity to explore the little known histories of the First World War and the anti-war movement in North West England while contextualizing these histories in the heritage, culture and memory of key Lancashire industrial towns. ? Increase in skills and capacity of the volunteer researchers in the archives - measured by the number of volunteers and the feedback relating to the development of new knowledge, confidence ? Enjoyable and satisfying experience for all project participants ? Breaking barriers between academic and community historians Outcomes for Wider Community ? Opportunity to learn about the Women's Crusade via the project outputs o booklet o touring exhibition o a short film - link here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pKRUdeNJVA8 o public talks and presentations o online blogs and platforms (e.g. GM1914 www.gm1914.wordpress.com) ? The Women's Peace Crusade will become widely known outside of archive and academic circles through online sharing of the documentary via social media by the volunteers. ? The Women's Peace Crusade project will present an alternative narrative, alongside all the War commemoration reminding participants and audiences that there have always been massive protests against military action. The project will include local stories of women in the narratives of First World War. Outcomes for Project Team and Academic Community: ? Opportunity to learn from continuous evaluation about the theoretical understanding and the practice of co-produced research and outputs ? Recognition of the complex range of skills and knowledges held within a community/academic partnership project ? Exploration of the different ways to "do research" and its implication for public engagement ? Sharing of project research with academic community through ? a peer-reviewed, open-access academic article ? reflective project review about the projects; approach and methodology
Start Year 2016
 
Description Volunteers and Voters: organising women for home and country 
Organisation National Federation of Women's Institutes
Department Pershore Women's Institute
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Coordinate, design and managed the project, directly and through employing heritage workers to support, manage and provide relevant training to community groups and lead engagement activity including: • Support community partners in helping to shape the project's design • Facilitate community researchers' access to contemporary research produced by academic community through events and materials. • Provide specialist training (e.g. on social media and oral history) and support pack including: contacts lists, annotated bibliography, websites, and notes on using social media. • Organise regular research progress meetings approximately every 6 weeks and knowledge exchange days. • Provide advice and support in person or by email, responding to queries within 3 days. • Manage the funds to pay expenses of travel to training and events with external speakers. • Create a digital directory of Influential Worcestershire Women from 1914-1934 • Co-ordinate and take responsibility for ensuring the research is written up for publication. • Organise the production of mobile exhibition. • Bring together community partners and University of Worcester digital media students to create a video sharing the stories of Worcestershire's Formidable Women, for screening on the project blog and at events and conferences. • Undertake relevant background and contextualising research in local, regional and national archives such as the Worcestershire Archives, Women's Library, British Library, Museum of English Rural Life and Imperial War Museum.
Collaborator Contribution Met regularly with academic or heritage worker to report, shape and discuss progress • Share research findings summaries of research findings and biographical detail of key women members for inclusion on WWI in the Vale blog and History Pin. • Contribute suggestions for Oral History subjects. • Contribute to creation of online project resources, including pieces for the project blog and the AHRC Voices of War and Peace website; and contribute images to Historypin.co.uk and the World War 100 / IWM 1914.org events database. • Participate in training session sessions and contribute Knowledge Exchange Days. • Champion the project activity within their communities, and ensure that all supporters and participants are informed of meetings, and opportunities to join in with any and all activities and events. • Ensure that representatives from their group attend training and events.
Impact • Academics and community participants alike will have a greater awareness and richer understanding of the new spheres of influence offered to domestic women by the growth of women's organisations during World War One • Establish and strengthen relationships between academic communities and women's organisations By combining depth of local and community memory with academic research and breadth of knowledge • Stimulate further research and publication in both academic and community spheres • Members of WIs and other women's organisations will be inspired to carry out research, conserve and records their history and become more aware of the resources that they can draw on to do so • The archives of further WI and other women's organisations will have been identified, preserved and documented; organisations will be introduced to Worcestershire Archives and Archaeological Service; all will be encouraged to deposit collections to secure their long-term preservation. • PhD students, staff and undergraduates at University of Worcester will have developed greater understanding and experience of working with communities, public engagement and collaboratively produced research.
Start Year 2016
 
Description Volunteers and Voters: organising women for home and country 
Organisation University of Worcester
Department Institute of Humanities & Creative Arts
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Coordinate, design and managed the project, directly and through employing heritage workers to support, manage and provide relevant training to community groups and lead engagement activity including: • Support community partners in helping to shape the project's design • Facilitate community researchers' access to contemporary research produced by academic community through events and materials. • Provide specialist training (e.g. on social media and oral history) and support pack including: contacts lists, annotated bibliography, websites, and notes on using social media. • Organise regular research progress meetings approximately every 6 weeks and knowledge exchange days. • Provide advice and support in person or by email, responding to queries within 3 days. • Manage the funds to pay expenses of travel to training and events with external speakers. • Create a digital directory of Influential Worcestershire Women from 1914-1934 • Co-ordinate and take responsibility for ensuring the research is written up for publication. • Organise the production of mobile exhibition. • Bring together community partners and University of Worcester digital media students to create a video sharing the stories of Worcestershire's Formidable Women, for screening on the project blog and at events and conferences. • Undertake relevant background and contextualising research in local, regional and national archives such as the Worcestershire Archives, Women's Library, British Library, Museum of English Rural Life and Imperial War Museum.
Collaborator Contribution Met regularly with academic or heritage worker to report, shape and discuss progress • Share research findings summaries of research findings and biographical detail of key women members for inclusion on WWI in the Vale blog and History Pin. • Contribute suggestions for Oral History subjects. • Contribute to creation of online project resources, including pieces for the project blog and the AHRC Voices of War and Peace website; and contribute images to Historypin.co.uk and the World War 100 / IWM 1914.org events database. • Participate in training session sessions and contribute Knowledge Exchange Days. • Champion the project activity within their communities, and ensure that all supporters and participants are informed of meetings, and opportunities to join in with any and all activities and events. • Ensure that representatives from their group attend training and events.
Impact • Academics and community participants alike will have a greater awareness and richer understanding of the new spheres of influence offered to domestic women by the growth of women's organisations during World War One • Establish and strengthen relationships between academic communities and women's organisations By combining depth of local and community memory with academic research and breadth of knowledge • Stimulate further research and publication in both academic and community spheres • Members of WIs and other women's organisations will be inspired to carry out research, conserve and records their history and become more aware of the resources that they can draw on to do so • The archives of further WI and other women's organisations will have been identified, preserved and documented; organisations will be introduced to Worcestershire Archives and Archaeological Service; all will be encouraged to deposit collections to secure their long-term preservation. • PhD students, staff and undergraduates at University of Worcester will have developed greater understanding and experience of working with communities, public engagement and collaboratively produced research.
Start Year 2016
 
Description 'Salting the Pig, Picking and Preserving the Fruit: the Rural West Midlands Home Front', Womens History Network Conference. Portsmouth 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact Lots of discussion and engagement.

Contacts made. Plans made for future activity, follow up meeting with Emma Ferry (Nottingham Trent) who has done work on Cropthorn Memorials in Worcestershire - interested in doing some work with her fashion students around fashion and clothes and WWI.
A special edition of the Journal Women's History Review is being produced from this conference of which I am one of the editors.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.port.ac.uk/centre-for-european-and-international-studies-research/events/women-gender-and...
 
Description 'Faith and Killing in the US Army in the Second World War: Some Perspectives from Europe' at 'Moralities of Warfare: The Committed Soldier' conference, 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Lecture given as part of conference
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description 'The Bible and the Military: The British and American Experience in Two World Wars' at AHRC-funded 'The Book and the Sword' symposium 'The Bible and the Cultures of War, 1914-1918', Cambridge University 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Keynote lecture delivered
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description 'Voices of the First World War: creative writing, conflict and reconciliation', Library of Birmingham 11 October 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The creative work was inspired by viewing archive material about WW1 that was on display in the Voices of War exhibition. This sparked questions and discussion about the legacy of the First World War.

All of the participants engaged in creative writing about conflict and legacy both during and after the workshop. A number of examples of creative work has now been submitted to us and will be uploaded to the website soon. Some of the comments from participants include: 'I felt an emotional journey when walking around the exhibition, reading the stories behind the exhibits', 'The honesty and encouragement of the tutors was refreshing and very helpful'
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.voicesofwarandpeace.org/event/workshop-voices-of-the-first-world-war-creative-writing-con...
 
Description Markets, depots and sales tables: the WI's and rural retailing 1915-1939 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The aim is to increase awareness of the WI in wartime

Asked to write up as article for new Journal entitled History of Retailing and Consumption
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description "1915": 'Road Scholar' Event at St. Hugh's College, Oxford 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact I presented a short talk on trench warfare to an audience composed entirely of American students. The Q & A session that followed brought up many interesting aspects of American views of the First World War and the meaning of the conflict in Britain, Canada and the United States.

Attendees commented favourably upon the event. Plans have been made to repeat the event in March 2016.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description "Britain at War" Day School for 6th Form Students, Camden, London, 19 March. Event held by Queen Mary, London as part of the Gateways to the First World Engagement Centre. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Myself and Dr. Dan Todman (Queen Mary) presented a series of panel discussions covering aspects of the British experience of the First World War. Dr. Todman covered the home front whilst I covered the front line. The day was structured around lively interactive exercises with much audience involvement and participation. Students were encouraged to relate to individual soldiers, civilians and children through a series of interactive examples. Feedback was uniformly excellent.

Attendees commented favourably upon the event, drawing particular attention to its innovative presentation style. Plans have been made to repeat the event in March 2016.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description "The very nerve of faith is touched" : British preaching during the Great War 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact The talk will be published in a collection later this year or in 2016

Information not provided
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description "Wait, Weep and Be Worthy? Women and the First World War. A Centenary Symposium" (part of the Being Human Festival), Glasgow Women's Library 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact This was the first of a series of events at GWL relating to Women and the First World War of which the events being organised by CI Methuen in summer 2016 will form a part.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://womenslibrary.org.uk/event/wait-weep-and-be-worthy-women-and-the-first-world-war-a-centenary-...
 
Description 'Being Young During World War One'; international conference, Manchester Metropolitan University 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Conference at Manchester Metropolitan University which involved academics and local history and community groups. The conference was received positively. Feedback included the following: 'I would like to see military and social historians brought together more as the pair could learn from each other'; 'a well put together conference with excellent speakers'; 'as a stall holder, it was great to be so central and accessible to delegates. There were some great conversations that were facilitated and lots of enthusiasm for the records I brought'; thanks for the opportunity, the talks were very interesting'; 'very interesting speakers. Overall and enjoyable experience'; 'this was my very first conference and wasn't sure what to expect. Thoroughly enjoyed it and were treated exceptionally'; 'Was an interesting and varied conference. Would be good to attend a future event in the same format, focussing on other areas of First World War History'; 'extremely interesting worthwhile and engaging conference; 'the whole conference was brilliantly organised and really interesting. Thanks very much for having me!'; 'I have enjoyed the conference today. All the papers have been excellent. Enough time in breaks to be able to network with people'; 'very impressed with all aspects of the organisation. Day ran smoothly. Intellectually fascinating but plenty of time for the important business of informal chat and networking'; 'This was an amazing day. I loved it all!'; 'lots of variety'; an enjoyable, varied and thought-provoking day'.

https://greatwarfiction.wordpress.com/2015/07/02/being-young-during-world-war-one/
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://storify.com/mcrh_mmu/byww1
 
Description 'Birmingham and the First World War: session for teachers', Library of Birmingham, 4 October 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Led to a discussion between archive and museum staff and teachers about how to engage young people in learning about WW1

The workshop generated discussion regarding how issues around legacy could be addressed in schools and teachers also considered how they might bid for Heritage Lottery Funding. One participant commented: 'I am interested in thinking more about HLF projects that could support our students'. Another commented that they would 'look into using more archive/museum material available with a greater focus on the local aspect to increase relevance and engagement'.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.voicesofwarandpeace.org/event/workshop-birmingham-and-the-first-world-war-a-session-for-t...
 
Description 'Engagement through Commemoration' presented within the seminar strand 'Case studies of university cultural learning projects -Intercultural communication', University of Riga 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact 30+ academic/postgraduate researchers and museum practitioners were asked to reflect on five questions concerning the process of cultural learning: posed by Agusita and Facer (2012): How knowledge develops? How people make meaning? How publics are constituted? How change happens and How knowledge-based institutions develop? Particular focus will be on identifying what evidence could be generated connected to each of these questions. Local heritage and cultural organisations were invited to attend and an academic expert from the locality.
As part of this international event Grosvenor presented a case study of cultural learning based on the work of the Voices Engagement Centre.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description 'Faith on the Somme: The Churches and the British Soldier in 1916', Palace Green Library, Durham University 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Public lecture delivered
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description 'Foreign Fields with The Play House', Library of Birmingham, 31 October 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact This was theatre in education participatory performance for children aged 8-11 and children fully immersed themselves in engaging with issues of conflict, loss and memory

During and after the event the children asked searching questions about conflict and conflict resolution
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description 'Friend or Foe' post-performance panel discussion 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Participated in panel discussion after the performance of 'Friend or Foe?', three WW1 dramas by FRED Theatre, held at Stan's Cafe.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description 'From Flanders to Helmand' keynote lecture at Voices of War and peace-funded 'Faith and the First World War' conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Keynote lecture delivered
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description 'From Voices of War to Voices of Peace: exploring the legacy of the First World War through participatory research' 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Paper presented at a seminar at the University of Barcelona organised by the research project 'Pedagogical thinking and educational spaces for European construction hundred years after the Great War. Between past and future, 25th November 2016.
25 in the audience - academics and doctoral students.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description 'Have we forgotten the horrors of war?' Royal Society of Arts Debate, The Hive, Worcester, 11 November 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact This debate is a joint event between the University of Worcester, the Royal Society of Arts and the Voices of War and Peace Engagement Centre and an audience of nearly 50 have signed up to attend

Data to be gathered on the day
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description 'Outbreak of War' exhibition, The Hive Worcester, August-December 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact 'Outbreak of War', The Hive Worcester, August-December is an exhibition based on the important archives relating to the First World War held by the city of Worcester archives. Outreach activities have also meant that private archives have been lent. The exhibition has generated significant interest among local communities, schools and academics and comments posted at the exhibition indicate how it has both informed and changed attitudes.

Lots of audience feedback has been received by the Local Study Centre based at The Hive, Worcester and this will be added here at a later date
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description 'The Battle of the Somme' programme for BBC Radio 4's 'Beyond Belief 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Lead discussant for Battle of the Somme programme
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b07h6n1q
 
Description 'The Recapture of Gheluvet, 1914' blog post 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact A blog post for the Voices of War and Peace website detailing the battle for control of Gheluvelt in 1914. This decisive action is of particular relevance for the West Midlands due to the involvement of the 2nd Worcestershire Regiment.

Hard to measure
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.voicesofwarandpeace.org/portfolio/the-recapture-of-gheluvelt/
 
Description 'Transatlantic Anglicanism in the First World War: The Wartime Career of Bishop Charles Henry Brent' at North American Conference of British Studies, Washington DC 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Delivered a paper at the conference
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description 100 Years of Tear Gas 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact The talk was organized by members of the Voices research network based at Birmingham City University. the event sparked an in-depth discussion about the legacy of using tear gas (first employed by French soldiers in 1914).

After the event discussions were held about a possible article submission for the Engagement Centre's website on the history of using tear gas.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.voicesofwarandpeace.org/event/discussion-100-years-of-tear-gas/
 
Description 100 years of The WI: women as agents of social change lecture and contribution to WI meeting in House of Parliament 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/parliamentarians
Results and Impact Wide ranging discussion and debate

Likely to lead to further activities and HLF bids by Womens Institutes across the country
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.parliament.uk/about/living-heritage/evolutionofparliament/2015-parliament-in-the-making/g...
 
Description 100 years of The WI: women as agents of social change lecture and contribution to WI meeting in House of Parliament 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/parliamentarians
Results and Impact Wide ranging discussion and debate.

Likely to lead to further activities and HLF bids by Womens Institutes across the country
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.parliament.uk/about/living-heritage/evolutionofparliament/2015-parliament-in-the-making/g...
 
Description 4th Annual Western Front Association President's Conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact I spoke on the importance of 1915 to the psychology of the British war effort.

Audience preconceptions were challenged and a wide ranging Q & A followed.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.firstworldwarcentenary.co.uk/fourth-wfa-presidents-conference-1915-a-year-of-trial-and-er...
 
Description A 1916 Foodfest: Bread, Jam and Christmas Puddings 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact An evening of music, films, short talks, exhibitions, tasting and demonstrations exploring what Christmas and everyday life was like 100 years ago when, at the mid-point of the First World War, food shortages had resulted in rising prices and queues for many basic foodstuffs. There were opportunities to try local jam and Christmas puddings, take a look at WWI recipes, view exhibitions on WWI, drink some mulled wine, do a little Christmas shopping and to enter our WWI bake-off.
Part of the Festival of Humanities.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description A Countryside at War: Rural England 1914-1919 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Links made with new projects in particularly the Wychavon HLF bid in relation to Heritage which is in the planning stage.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Alternative World War I Day School- Saturday 15th November 2014, Manchester 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Larger than expected attendance
Attracted attendees from the region and beyond

The event was organised by 'No Glory in War' (Manchester) and was supported by the Manchester Centre for Regional History and the Working-Class Movement Library, Salford.

Report back on the workshop: 'We went away feeling inspired'

Attendees and speakers commented on excellent workshops on WWI and peace movement and would like to hold another workshop in 2015

Other URLs:

http://www.hssr.mmu.ac.uk/mcrh/2014/12/08/dayschool/ ;
https://noglorymanchester.wordpress.com/2014/09/18/dayschool/;
https://noglorymanchester.wordpress.com/2014/12/04/dayschoolthanks/
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.hssr.mmu.ac.uk/mcrh/2014/10/15/wwidayschool/
 
Description Anti-Alien sentiment in Manchester and Salford 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact As part of a project developed with the Ahmed Iqbal Ullah Race Relations Resource Centre in Manchester, 15 Pakistant women from the Deeplish Community Centre in Rochdale explored the prosecution of Dutch heritage brothers who were tobacconists in Manchester and who were arrested under the Defence of the Realm Act in 1915. The severity of the prosecution appears to have reflected misunderstanding that the brothers were of German heritage. The women took part in workshops which involved learning about about archive research. As a result of this research, the Race Relations Resource Centre is now exploring other anti-alien activity in Manchester and Salford during World War One with the aim of delivering an exhibition in Manchester Central Library, where it is based, in 2016
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Army Staff Ride: 'Somme 16' 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This was a multi-national staff ride and the largest such event undertaken by the British Army since 1968. I served as an academic advisor on the tour. Representatives from Britain, France, Germany, Belgium, Australia, Canada and Eire attended the staff ride.
Participants on the Staff Ride offered a range of probing questions and engaging in a week-long debate on the experiences of their respective armies during the Battle of the Somme 1916.
Officers on the tour reported a great increase in their understanding of the First World War in general and the Battle of the Somme in particular.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Army Staff Ride: 'Somme 16' Study Day at Tidworth Study Centre 'A Battle of Gunners: British and German Artillery at the Battle of the Somme 1916' 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The talk was part of a series of academic talks regarding the relevance of the Battle of the Somme 1916 to the British, French and German armies in preparation for the Somme 16 Staff Ride.
There was an in-depth discussion of the experience of the British, French and German forces at the battle and the continued relevance of their experiences to the wars of today.
Contact details were shared between myself (SJ) and the curator of the French Museum of Artillery in preparation for future discussions.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description BBC Radio 4 Sunday programme's 'Somme Letters' 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact I advised on this radio programme
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p0408qzr
 
Description Black Poppies book event 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact There was a wide ranging interaction between the speaker and the audience where advice was shared and key concerns about researching the experience of Black soldiers were discussed.

Following the event discussions focused on the development of new bids either to the HLF or potentially to the research fund. These focused on either a large scale collaborative bid with multiple community partners looking at the experience during and post the First World War of soldiers from the Caribbean and West Africa or focusing on the 100th anniversary of the British West Indies Regiment. Discussions to be followed up early 2015.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Blog posts (JOMEC blog, Voices blog, yello brick blog) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact More for information dissemination than expecting any solid outcomes.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Blog posts, Voices of War & Peace' and 'On This Day' 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Two blog entries for The Iron Room blog:
One general update on the Centre: https://theironroom.wordpress.com/2016/08/01/voices-of-war-peace-the-great-war-and-its-legacy/
One on specific 'On This Day' project: https://theironroom.wordpress.com/2016/12/05/on-this-day/
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://theironroom.wordpress.com/2016/08/01/voices-of-war-peace-the-great-war-and-its-legacy/
 
Description Britain's Black Community & the Great War 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Participants who had worked on HLF WW1 projects or were thinking about running their own projects were invited to give short presentations. This was followed by a wide-reaching discussion within the group about legacy and the engagement of young people with this subject.

Following discussions a request was made for Voices to organize follow-on events to continue the conversation and to encourage further networking among the participants. Many participants commented that it would be helpful for them if academics/experts in this field were invited to a workshop-type event. This will now be planned for later in 2015.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.voicesofwarandpeace.org/event/discussion-britains-black-community-and-the-great-war/
 
Description British Army Day Conference at 39th (Corunna) Battery 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This was a day conference held at 39th (Corunna) Battery based at Thirsk, Yorkshire. The aim of the conference was to discuss the meaning of the First World War centenary for the modern British Army and in particular how to relate British Army experiences of 1914-18 into relevant dialogue for present day officers and men. The debate was detailed and lively.

A written report entitled "Beyond Operation REFLECT: The Relevance of the First World War to Army 2020" based upon the discussion was produced by Major Peter Lambert. This has been distributed to stakeholders and policy makers. It contains several key recommendations for enhancing commemoration within the British Army.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description CUROP Project on Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Undergraduate students
Results and Impact UG student as part of the Undergraduate Research Opportunities Programme (8 weeks intensive work on the project).

The student carried out a detailed content analysis of press coverage of the installation at the Tower and then inputted that data into SPSS.

The student gained research skills and an insight into the debates around this high-profile installation.
Skills included:
1.Confidence locating and utilising archival data (from Lexis Nexis)
2.Putting together and piloting a content analysis to capture both quantitative and (limited) qualitative data.
3.Choosing an appropriate sampling mechanism.
4.Carrying out a content analysis of press reporting
5.Data entry into SPSS
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Cake Bakers and Trouble Makers, BBC2 Documentary on history of the WI, 20 July 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Strong media interest - a number of national newspapers discussed the thesis that WI was feminist - interaction and contact follow-up queries from both academics, general public, WIs etc.

Too early to say - follow up discussions with other academics and community groups
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Cardiff Book Talk, In Parenthesis 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact To explore In Parenthesis and in particular the challenges of adapting it, we welcome:David Antrobus, co-librettist of the Welsh National Opera's adaptation of In Parenthesis, as well as a director, actor and writer; Beth McIntyre, senior curator of prints and drawings at the National Museum Wales and curator of the 'War's Hell!'The Battle of Mametz Wood in Art exhibition; Dr Toby Thacker, Senior Lecturer in Modern European History at Cardiff University and expert on the cultural, political and military history of the twentieth century in Europe.

Edited highlights from the questionnaires.
The variety of the speakers was fascinating.
Very stimulating event. Excellent to see visual, literary, operatic and historical responses to this amazing text.
Interesting and informative discussion.
Excellent choice of speakers showing different perspectives on his work.
Brilliant --thank you! I look forward to the next event!
It was very interesting to hear about the challenges of staging an exhibition including poetry and literature -- and have me ideas for setting up similar multimedia exhibitions in the future.
It has shown me the benefits of considering not only the written word but, if an author has produced works in other mediums, I will delve into other works to better understand literature.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://cardiffbooktalk.org/2016/11/15/david-jones-in-parenthesis-event-review/
 
Description Cardiff Remembers event at Firing Line Museum/Cardiff Castle Blog post October 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Emma Routley from Cardiff Castle has written a blog post for the Voices website which outlines the activity, see URL below
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.voicesofwarandpeace.org/2015/10/14/cardiff-remembers/
 
Description Centenary of the Battle of Gheluvelt Seminar, The Hive, Worcester, 28 October 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The seminar part of a broader community based event and stimulated questions and discussions

After the talk participants commented that the presentation had added significantly to their knowledge base about the locally important event
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Centre Launch Event 21 March Library of Birmingham 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The event launched the Centre and included presentations by a Heritage Lottery Fund project, the Centre, local Councillors and a School. There was also a panel discussion. All of these led to discussionm and questions about legacy

Relationships with community organisations were developed and there was a request for further information
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Chaired a talk on the founder of the Women's Institute 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Increased awareness of history of Women's Institutes and of Mrs Watt who spoke at the first meeting of Pershore WI in 1916 - a sharing of ideas between academic and community researchers.

Stimulating and supporting the community group which has put in an HLF project bid and encouraging some others to consider putting in HLF bids.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://ww1inthevale.wordpress.com/2015/03/24/organising-women-in-ww1/
 
Description Challenging History Conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This conference, jointly hosted by Amgueddfa Cymru-National Museum Wales and Cardiff University, explored how cultural practitioners are working in innovative and responsive ways with difficult and sensitive heritages/themes.
The conference - held one week after the Brexit vote - had a real sense of urgency about it, and led to discussions about the role of museums and heritage institutions within public discourse and the social justice agenda. There was sharing of practice around commemoration of WW1 (a significant strand of the conference), but also of work with migrants and refugees, LGBT+ groups, people with disabilities, and others
who continue to be disenfranchised from mainstream heritage practice and in society. There were a series of performances and off-site visits including at a cemetery, local asylum seeker and refugee support centre and the Temple of Peace. The conference dinner was held at The Clink (Cardiff Prison).
Summaries here:
https://challenginghistorynetwork.wordpress.com/2016-conference/
https://challenginghistorynetwork.wordpress.com
Feedback on the conference was incredibly positive and attests to the broad impacts on attendees:
'It was a really good mix of both academics and museum professionals which I haven't experienced before, and it was good to see both sides expressing opinions on the same ideas.'
'Overall, it was an enlightening and engaging conference. I thoroughly enjoyed it.'
'The variety in pace tone and approach. The conferencewas not a full on intellectual assault I felt that there was a time to listen a time to ask a time to talk and timeto reflect. I went to Oasis and I am unlikely to ever forget that.'
'Inspirational talks, thought-provoking discussions, some brilliant ideas!'
'New connections and networks built at the conference. Ideas for further reading. Reflection on my current research and practice about my role within the sector (am I vocal enough), about being explicit about what I present and how I know (authority) and the role of museums in narrative-making.'
'I really enjoyed the different venues, spaces and formats of the conference. I thought these suited the multidisciplinary nature of the conference really well and kept bringing up new things to talk about. I thought the overall quality of presentations was very high'
'it was inspiring and could well have an impact in the way I work here'
'the conversations around the 'activist' museum will certainly form part of my discussions at IWM about how we respond to Global Citizenship in our public programming. Partnership projects and how these can work has also informed my practice in this new role; particularly ensuring partners are involved in planning not just presented with an idea and asked to get involved at a later stage.'
'Firstly, I would like to thank all of the organisers and the host organisations for a truly inspiring conference. It was wonderful to get museum professionals and university researchers together in this way and I sincerely hope that there will be future gatherings'
'It was the slickest run conference I've ever been to with such a variety of inspiring and engaging talks and workshops. I'm due to write a report about the conference for my team but quite frankly, I'm not sure how I'll fit it all in!'
blog post by attendee at
https://eternalstudent2015.wordpress.com/2016/07/19/challenging-histories-a-few-thoughts/
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://challenginghistorynetwork.wordpress.com/2016-conference/
 
Description Children at War, FoBAH project launch 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The Friends of Birmingham Archives & Heritage held a launch event for their new project 'Children at War', supported by an HLF Understanding WW1 grant and the Voices centre.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Completed consultancy work with BBC for the eight series of Home Front Drama Series 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Various stories reworked and adapted.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b047qhc2
 
Description Conference "Officers, Leadership and Combat Readiness in the Great War" held at Cinamil (Army Research Centre) in Lisbon, Portugal. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Wide ranging discussion of the difference between British and Portuguese military organisation, culture and performance in the Great War. Audience members were extremely interested in a British perspective. Through the use of translators a wide ranging multi-lingual discussion was held.

Strong links have been forged with the Portuguese military, who are keen to develop international partners for their ongoing research. Links were also made with several Portuguese parliamentarians who were in attendance, including the Heritage Minister.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Conference Paper: With New Eyes I See: Writing fact/fiction in digital heritage experiences 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact There was a very helpful debate about the ethics of using games formats for interpreting sensitive heritages, and of digital media more generally. Interest in the platform to tell multiple stories.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Conference on Nursing in WW1 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact There was a wide range of discussion and questions and follow up emails.

The conference brought together academic and community researchers and students who were interested in the history of nursing and medical care in WW1.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.worcester.ac.uk/discover/edith-cavell-and-the-role-of-nursing-during-ww-one-is-subject-of...
 
Description Conference on the Labour Party and World War One at Anglia Ruskin University (paper presentation) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Presentation of a paper at the conference by Marcus Morris. A book proposal has been submitted coming out of the conference on the Labour Party and the First World War, in which Marcus will be contributing a chapter based on the talk he gave.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Conference, Rhodes Scholars: Causes, Course and Consequences of the First World War 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Undergraduate students
Results and Impact This was a conference held at St. Hugh's College, Oxford, with the delegates consisting entirely of Rhodes Scholars from around the world. Although history was well represented amongst the delegates there were also students from politics, economics, social policy and international relations.
Over the course of a week there was wide ranging and insightful discussion on many issues. Key themes were the nature of government decision making in immature democracies (e.g. Imperial Germany), the economics of total war, coping with social dislocation in Europe (in particular the contrasting experiences of Belgian and Polish refugees) and the influence of the war on the present day Middle East.
Many of the delegates reported that they felt they had learned more about the First World War in a week of intensive study than they had in their previous academic careers. There were numerous requests for further information and events.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Cross-curricular workshop: Reddish Vale High School, Stockport, 5/6/2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact This was a cross-curricular workshop with Year 9 pupils which encouraged pupils to practice key skills required at GCSE in both History and English. Pupils were asked to analyse propaganda posters from the homefront and to empathise with the families of the soldiers left behind at home. Utilising skills acquired at Key Stage 3 to analyse and produce non-fiction texts, the pupils then had to produce their own propaganda posters / speeches and letters. The workshop was led by two hIstory undergraduate students who have apassion for their subject and would like to teach it in schools. Both students have successfully got onto a PGCE for History and will commence training in the Autumn of 2016

100% of pupils said they learnt something they didn't know previously. 100% said they had learnt skills which would help them to do better in their History exams and coursework. 100% said they felt more confident with History after the workshop. 65% of pupils said that they would consider studying at MMU in the future.

Comments:

I learned techniques used in propaganda posters to convince people to do things, for example, imperatives, alliteration and emotive language I learned about propaganda and the techniques that are used to make it. For example: imperative commands I learnt how to share my ideas in the group and then combine our ideas together; Very well organised
Good activities that kept me interested
I thought it was wonderful and all the people are very helpful
I enjoyed working in groups and doing something different
"I learnt about the different ways posters were used during the war to bring out emotion."
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Diaries 1 WW1-WW2, BBC Broadcast - Woman's Hour 11 May 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Follow up phone calls from people offering diaries of relations in WWI
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Discussion: Women & WW1 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Participants who had worked on HLF WW1 projects or were thinking about running their own projects and academics specializing in this area were invited to give short presentations. This was followed by a wide-reaching discussion within the group about women's roles during the war and the way that history has been explored.

Following the discussion some of the attendees have been invited to participate in an event organized by the Engagement Centre for the Connected Communities festival in June 2015.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.voicesofwarandpeace.org/event/discussion-women-and-ww1/
 
Description Discussion: the Asian Contribution to the Great War 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The afternoon consisted of a series of presentations by speakers followed by a general discussion. The audience was very engaged with the presentations and the event concluded with a broad ranging discussion of needs, interests and the way forward.

Following discussions the Centre has been called on to support events being run by projects, including British Future's HLF bid, 'An Unknown and Untold Story' about Muslim soldiers.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.voicesofwarandpeace.org/event/discussion-the-asian-contribution-to-the-great-war/
 
Description Diverse-city and the Great War discussion event 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact 'Diverse-city' and the Great War was a one day conference organised by the Voices centre focusing on best practice and engaging with a selection of culturally diverse HLF projects from across HLF regions. Participants came from across the UK, including members of Disability History Scotland (Edinburgh) and Writing on the Wall (Liverpool). The discussion event was very positive and led to the participants establishing contacts with other organisations and making plans to share further ideas/knowledge. The event also led to plans to submit applications to the Voices community research fund.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Diversity & Legacy discussion event 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact The event was held in order to explore issues around different groups who have had HLF funding for Ww1 projects engaging with the commemoration. The event followed on from teo earlier events and brought together live or complete HLF projects to have conversations around what we understand by legacy and also working in collaboration with academics. The event included short presentations by each project and an open discussion about future ways of working together.

Plans for further contact between academics and community groups and partners were made. A Google document has been set up to enable groups to share information about their projects and for academics to share their fields of expertise, with the aim of encouraging collaborative work. Further discussions about impact assessment were also held and will be continued.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://storify.com/JenniWaugh/whn-wm-and-ww1-in-the-vale-at-the-voices-www1-comm?awesm=sfy.co_a0pum...
 
Description Dorset First World War History Weekend 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact A lively and thought-provoking debate between the speaker and the audience over many issues of the First World War and particularly regional commemoration.

Key organisers were completely unaware of the AHRC Centres. An informal discussion was held regarding the opportunities available and how to apply. It is hoped that this interest will be followed up later in 2015.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description First World War Gateways 'Street by Street' Workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact I participated in a workshop held in Camden, London and organised by the Gateways FWW centre. The workshop used genealogy and census records to develop an understanding of the private lives of First World War soldiers.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description First World War postcards, Cardiff Story 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Museum staff and volunteers helped parents/carers talk to children about the differences between living during the First World War and now (e.g. ways of communicating with friends and family (mobile phones and emails versus writing letters and sending postcards).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Gender and the Home Front during the First World War, Briefing for HLF 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Talk covered the following topics:
• How the Home Front was a new sort of war for Britain
• Myths and histories women on the Home Front
• Examples of WWI Home Front Projects
• Issues and debates about the complexity of commemoration the WWI and the place of the Home Front within this commemoration

below quote from thank-you email from Lucy Footer (First World War Centenary & Anniversaries Advisor):
The briefing went so well and was summed up really nicely in the feedback I received from one of our Grant Officers from the London team:
'I really enjoyed this morning, it's really pushed me to think about the people who participate in our projects and their needs and challenges, as well as consider our responsibility as a funder to ensure history is investigated critically... thank you!'
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Gendering Remembrance: the home front in contemporary media and community engagement with the First World War, Keynote Lecture at Imperial War Museum North Conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Lots of discussion and follow up request to undertake Tim Curtis Memorial Lecture on similar topic in November at Central Lancashire University.
Discussions with HLF and community group representatives.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Great War Book Launch, Imperial War Museum North, 14 September 2014 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Book launch at the Imperial War Museum North of Nick Mansfield and Craig Horner (eds.), The Great War: Localities and Regional Identities (Cambridge Scholars Press, 2014) and Nick Mansfield (ed.), 'The Great War and the North West', Manchester Region History Review, vol. 24, 2013

The launch included short talks by David Swift (University of Central Lancashire on working-class patriotism and Helen McCartney (Kings College, London), on local patriotism in the North West.

Launch and talks attracted considerable interest from the public and helped consolidate links among a range of scholars. Speakers invited to contribute to other talks on the subject.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.hssr.mmu.ac.uk/mcrh/2014/08/14/perspectives14/
 
Description HLF workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Participation in HLF Wales information session for community organisations considering applying to the HLF for WW1 projects. A presentation was given, explaining the role of the Voices centre in supporting groups.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Haig and 1915 Day Conference at Brasenose College, Oxford, 11 March 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact My talk on "The British Army and 1915" was well received by an audience primarily composed of Oxford based historians and students, plus some members of the public. The topic of historiography was prominently discussed. The key question that emerged is "Why have the battles of the war been forgotten?"

Attendees commented favourably upon the event. Following the lectures, the faculty and students of Brasenose assembled for Church service followed by re-dedication of the restored college war memorial.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Haig's Firefighters: First Ypres, 1914, Western Front Association Public Lecture 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact A lively Q & A discussing the career and controversies of Field Marshal Haig followed the main presentation.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.westernfrontassociation.com/edit-events/print/1151-haig-s-firefighters-brigadier-generals...
 
Description Heritage Lottery Fund First World War and Engagement Centre Workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The session involved presentations from the Engagement Centre, History Pin and the various funded projects. The presentations and subsequent discussions generated cross-project information sharing about research problems and solutions.

The participants all stated that it was valuable to know that there was such expertise both attached to the Centre and within the other HLF funded projects. There was a collective request for a further meeting in 2015.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Home Food and Family in WW1 Conference with Women's History Network Midlands Region 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Upskilling those on HLF projects, enabling them to share information and experiences with each other and academic community.
Following the event many involved - including those who spoke on the panel and some who exhibited - talked of a increase in confidence and energy regarding the work they were doing on their projects.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://ww1inthevale.wordpress.com/2016/03/08/food-family-home-in-ww1-conference-report/
 
Description Hospitals During the First World War, Cardiff Story & Firing Line Museum 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Participants made their own soldier or nurse peg dolls, as children during the First World War would have made for wounded soldiers staying in the military hospitals housed in local schools.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description How the Pershore Plum won the Great War 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Great awareness and engagement with WWI Home Front sharing of research.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Imperial War Museum North: Tweets from the Trenches Tweet-Up with Tony Walsh, accompanied by pupils from the Albion Academy in Salford, 6/7/2014 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact At 1pm Pupils from the Albion Academy in Salford performed their tweets to a large audience, accompanied by performance poet, Tony Walsh. 200 took part. This was preceded by a performance of the last post, followed by period music from One Education Youth Orchestra. It led to a great deal of interaction and positive feedback. The performance helped raise the profile of 'Tweets' and enabled them to reach a wide audience.

The performance helped to raise the profile of the project and helped us to reach a wider audience.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description In Parenthesis Engage 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Literature Wales Writing Squads arrived from all around the Country at the National Museum for a day of creativity and performance led by WNO in partnership with NMW, Literature Wales and Mayflower Engage. The had a gallery tour of the Mametz exhibition and watched a performance of IP Engage within the gallery. Roughly 40 school children.

In the afternoon the session opened up to members of the public to take part in Come and Sing in the main foyer of the Museum. There were up to 100 people present for that. In the evening the participants went to the Millennium centre to see the Field installation and watch the opera.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://museum.wales/cardiff/whatson/9011/Come--Sing-at-the-Museum-Songs-from-the-Trenches/
 
Description International Women's Day blogs 8 March 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact The aim is to increase awareness of different areas approaches / areas for studying WW1 and to encourage people to engage with research. Blogs were published on the following websites:
The History Press (www.thehistorypress.co.uk/index.php/updates/womens-lives-in-wartime)
Home Front Radio 4 drama series (www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/radio4/entries/d02d78a1-3c3d-495f-a7b5-1656019d7ff3)
HLF (www.hlf.org.uk/about-us/news-features/uncovering-hidden-stories-women-and-first-world-war)

Hard to tell as yet
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Jamfest 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact An exhibition about jam and plums in Pershore during the First World War and also Volunteers and Voters. Visitors had a chance to taste jam made from Pershore plums, pick up recipe card with information about WWI food shortages and talk to post-graduate students about the home front in WW1.
This exhibition was part of the official opening of the Plumlines Project at Croome Court and also part of the Festival of Humanities.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Keynote Paper at being Young in World War One Conference, Manchester Metropolitan University, 'Jumping on the Bandwagon: Fantasy and reality in contemporary texts about WW1.' 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact There was a wide range of discussion and questions after the paper, at lunch and in follow up emails.

A copy of the paper was requested by a Maori historian who attended and has been shared amongst his colleagues in New Zealand.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.hssr.mmu.ac.uk/mcrh/ww1/beingyoung/
 
Description Keynote lecture at National Museum Scotland, Edinburgh 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The presentation focused on the intersections between ethics and impact in digital cultural heritage research. It asked how we can legitimately talk about impact in digital cultural heritage research, and whether there is an ethical dimension to that question that we should be unpacking. Drawing on recent research with Amgueddfa Cymru - National Museum Wales it explored what impact can look like in practice; messy, difficult to grasp and itself a surprising catalyst.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://dchrn.de.ed.ac.uk/workshops/workshop-2-playing-with-method-planning-for-impact/
 
Description Keynote speech "The Legacy of the First World War to the 21st Century British Army, The Master Gunner's [Royal Artillery] Dinner 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/parliamentarians
Results and Impact The audience, which consisted of senior defence industry figures, military officers and foreign office diplomats, expressed their interest in the topic and many commented that their pre-conceived ideas had been challenged.

A link was forged with Steve Rowbotham, Chief Operating Officer, General Dynamics UK, who expressed an interest in providing financial support for community projects studying munitions work in the First World War.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Knitting in Wartime study day, Glasgow 27 March 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Audience listened, knitted, engaged with talks and asked questions.

Follow up blogs of people interested and engaging with the topics discussed.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Launch of Glamorgan Remembers project and exhibition at the CC4 Museum of Welsh Cricket 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The event comprised of a series of talks by a group of speakers looking back to events a hundred years ago, and in particular what took place in Gallipoli during 1915. The evening, which was staged in conjunction with The Royal British Legion, began with a short talk by Dr. Andrew Hignell, the Curator of the Museum and the Archivist of Glamorgan CCC, outlining events from the cricketing summer of 1914 and the early years of the War.

Conversations about how Glamorgan Remembers can develop are ongoing (I am meeting Andrew on 25th). He has already made strides with the next stage of the project which will be working with schools and cricket clubs in Barry. In addition, Andrew is now in discussion with schools in Blaena and Abercynon who are interested in coming on board with the project.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.glamorgancricket.com/community/5600.php
 
Description Lecture at Christie's London 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact JK presented on the theme of digital media ethics. This touched on work on WW1 being carried out around the UK, and the work of the engagement centre. An invitation to do another presentation was extended and the event informed the writing of a chapter.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Lost Boys Exhibition, Holden Gallery, Manchester Metropolitan University 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact At the outbreak of World War 1, the legal age limit for armed service overseas in the British Army was 19 years, yet by the end of the war an estimated 250,000 underage soldiers between the ages of 14 and 18 had seen active service.

This exhibition featured three elements of commemoration of young people and families affected by World War 1, using the medium of ceramic plates, flowers and models. The first part of the exhibition featured work in progress from a project working with young people in the Staffordshire area, which explored memory and commemoration in relation to the North Staffordshire Regiment and the experiences of underage soldiers in the First World War. The second part of the exhibition featured ceramics that commemorate the memories of people from the Manchester/North West area, and looked at the wider issues of all the young people affected by World War 1, from young children left behind or bereaved to young protesters and pacifists who opposed the war. Finally, the exhibition featured original works by acclaimed ceramicist, project lead and curator of the exhibition, Professor Steve Dixon (MMU), whose work has led the way in re-figuring war commemoration in this medium, in terms of collective memory and public engagement.

On Remembrance Sunday, the exhibition space served as a performance area for a special one off performance by the Honour Choir, during which visitors took part in the silence, and heard the choir's voices raised in contemplative commemoration for lives lost in war.

c. 150-200 visitors saw the exhibition and over 200 brochures were taken. On-line media capture included the following twitter feedback:
https://storify.com/mmu_hssr/humanities-in-public-war
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Making Sense of Community Engagement in and with History and Heritage Based Research 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The activity brought community groups and academics together to discuss working collaboratively on WW1-related projects. The event encouraged debate and discussion about a number of topics, e.g. motivation behind projects, is commemoration culturally diverse, reporting activity and evaluating projects, challenges projects have faced. Collective views on how the centres gather data was sought.

Feedback from the event was overwhelmingly positive. When asked 'Which parts of the event did you find more interesting or useful?' comments included:
Sharing of ideas, expertise, open discussion; Hearing from others about the challenges they have encountered; Networking; Potential future collaborations have emerged; A very useful event.

Subsequent discussion between two participants, Laura Sambrooks from Central Youth Theatre and David Savill form Age Exchange.
Email from Laura 23.07.15: David Savill from Age Exchange is also interested in working with us, and Central Youth Theatre would now like to do a theatre project. The subject would still be the same-looking at the struggle to get the soldiers pardoned, with a particular focus John Hipkins and how his experiences as a POW (only aged 14) in the Second World War encouraged him to lead the Shot at Dawn campaign. We're looking at doing reminiscence sessions (helped by Age Exchange) with the young people to learn about the people involved with the SAD campaign and perhaps the experiences of other child POWs.
As this would now culminate in a theatre piece rather than film, the role of the university would probably be more about the research side of the project.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Mapping Grangetown event 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact MappingGrangetown: Language, Place and Poetry, Public Workshop in Collaboration with Cardiff University's Community Gateway.

Join Dr Dylan Foster Evans (School of Welsh) to learn more about Grangetown during the First World War, and try some creative writing with award-winning Welsh writer Jon Gower.
This is a public workshop in collaboration with Cardiff University's Community Gateway (http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/community-gateway)
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Mayors Coffee Morning to launch the Pershore HLF projects 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact There was lots of discussion and interest from the general public - exchange of research discovered and enthusiasm by volunteers spread to community.

Increased confidence in 2 HLF groups who are now participating in collaboratively written book (How the Pershore Plum Won the War) and increased awareness of their activities in the town resulting in some new contacts.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://ww1inthevale.wordpress.com
 
Description Media Interview on BBC Wales 11 February on Agriculture in WWI 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Hard to measure

Increased awareness of the significance of family farms in Wales to production of food in WWI.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Melbourne & WW1 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Talk given by Nicole Davis, a visiting postgraduate student from the University of Melbourne, about Melbourne's experiences during WW1 and exploring parallels with Birmingham during the same period. The talk led to an interesting discussion with academics and members of the public, many of whom had family connections with Australia. The Voices centre has already established a relationship with the University of Melbourne on a project called On This Day, which explores the wartime experiences of each city through newspaper articles.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description National Football Museum, Manchester: Tweets from the Trenches Tweet-Up with Paul Cookson, accompanied by Pupils from St Peter's RC High School and The East Manchester Academy, 6/7/2014 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact At 1pm pupils year 7-11 pupils from St Peter's High School performed their tweets to a large audience at the museum, accompanied by poet, Paul Cookson. The Tweets were projected onto a large screen. 150 pupils took part. This was preceded by a performance of the Last Post, followed by period music from Blackley State Band. The performance helped raise the profile of this work and helped it to reach a wide audience.

Pupil comment:
I really enjoyed performing today. It has given me more confidence.

The performance helped to raise the profile of the project and helped us to reach a wider audience.

" I really enjoyed performing today. It has given me more confidence"
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description New Social and Cultural Histories of First World War at the Social History Conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Lively debate which will continue online and may lead to further areas of research or writing.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description One in six: the Indian subcontinent and the First World War 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Two talks by military historians were given (William Spencer, Principal Military Historian from The National Archives & Jahan Mahmood, Independent Military Historian) which sparked questions and discussion afterwards.

After the event the Engagement Centre and The National Archives discussed the possibility of further joint events, possibly looking at women and WW1.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.voicesofwarandpeace.org/event/one-in-six-the-indian-subcontinent-and-the-first-world-war/
 
Description One in six: the South Asian contribution to the First World War, April 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The talks and drop-in session encouraged debate around the subject of the Asian contribution to WW1.

This event was the fist time Voices collaborated with the National Archives. The event was a success (the talk was sold out) and so this will hopefully lead to further collaborative work.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://blog.nationalarchives.gov.uk/blog/south-asian-contribution-first-world-war/
 
Description Organising Women conference, Bantock House, 21 March 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Increased awareness of history of women's organisations, sharing of ideas between academic and community researchers.

Stimulating and supporting community groups undertaking HLF projects and encouraging some other to consider putting in HLF bids.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://ww1inthevale.wordpress.com/2015/03/24/organising-women-in-ww1/
 
Description Participation at University Public Engagement with Research event 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact We presented an update on the Voices centre activity from 2014-2016 and gave an overview of our plans for the next three years.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Participation in BBC iWonder pilot project, March 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact The Coordinator participated in a pilot programme for BBC iWonder. This involved writing content related to WW1, commenting on other content and providing feedback on the website.

The BBC iWonder tool will go public and the feedback provided by the Coordinator may have had an impact on that.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.bbc.co.uk/iwonder
 
Description Pershore in WWI at White Ladies Aston Hall Worcestershire 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Wide range of interest and engagement shown.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Planting memorial cross 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Glasgow University is planting a memorial cross on the centenary of the death of each person named on the war memorial. I was asked to read the biography and plant the cross for a member of the faculty of divinity who was killed in the battle of Loos on 25 June 1915.

This activity is about reminding those who pass by the memorial garden of the steady stream of those who died.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.gla.ac.uk/events/ww1/events/
 
Description Presentation to U3A Worcester 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact I spoke on the experience of Worcester regiments in the First World War. The audience expressed much interest and surprise at the extent of Worcestershire's involvement in the conflict.

None to report.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Presentation to WFA Warwick Branch 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact I spoke on the experience of Warwickshire soldiers in the war. Audience preconceptions were challenged and a wide ranging Q & A followed.

n/a
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Project with undergraduate students on student reporting of WW1 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Undergraduate students
Results and Impact UG students worked on the project and produced the outcomes. These were then shared with other students, and in a conference presentation in November.
Project aims:
To engage students with the commemoration of WW1 through the 100 year old stories of their classmates;
To explore the archive and unearth interesting stories from 1914-1918 that demonstrate
how the students responded to the war;
To explore the wider context at the time and how, for most students, life continued despite the wider context of war;
To bring together creative responses to the war where these were produced; poems, art, cartoons, music, literature etc. These might be useful subject matter for the documentary;
To scan all of the relevant materials so that these can be used to compile a number of project outcomes

The students gained valuable skills including:
1.Archival research skills
2.Writing for documentary / communication skills
3.Digital skills
They also gained a developed sense of the realities of WW1 for people their own age, and the wider societal and cultural context to that conflict.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Public Lecture at Wolverhampton Western Front Association 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact I spoke on the role of Wolverhampton, both militarily and economically, in the Great War. A lively Q & A session followed where much information about family history was shared.

None to report.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Public Lecture at the University of Wolverhampton 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact I spoke on the history of the Royal Artillery in the First World War. Audience expressed interest in the topic and there was wide ranging interaction in the Q & A that followed.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Public Lecture: 'The Russian Front, 1916' at Warwick Western Front Association 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact An extended Q & A discussed the relevance of the First World War to present day Russia and drew comparisons between present day Russian military expeditions.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Questioning Commemoration: the Home Front in the First World War 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Invited speaker giving the Tim Curtis Memorial lecture at the University of Central Lancashire to an audience of academics, postgrads, general public including school teachers, community historians and interested local people.
Links made between postgrads at Worcester and postgrads at UCLAN in relation to Tipperary Clubs.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Radio Interview on Woodbine Willie - Worcester vicar and his post-war legacy/opposition to war 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Hopefully increased interest and people utilising the Woodbine Willie trail put together by HLF funded Worcestershire WW1 100 Project
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Radio Interviews 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Hopefully engagement with the history of WWI as a legacy of WWI food shortage.

Hard to measure.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Radio Interviews: BBC Wales - Wednesday 16 September & BBC Berkshire - Friday 18 September 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Hopefully engagement with the history of WWI as a legacy of WWI food shortage

Hard to tell
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Radio interviews 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Hopefully engagement with the history of WWI as a legacy of WWI food shortage

Hard to measure.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Research presentation at Bute 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Participants in your research and patient groups
Results and Impact JK presented on the theme of digital media ethics (following a blog post on this in November for the Digital Learning Network). This touched on work on WW1 being carried out around the UK, and the work of the engagement centre.

The paper is now being worked up into a chapter for a Heritage reader which will hopefully be out in early 2017. The original blog post proved really popular, and I had requests to circulate the paper from the presentation from many people in the sector.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.digitallearningnetwork.net/news-blog/digital-museum-ethics-dealing-with-difficult-issues/
 
Description Royal Artillery Shrapnel Lectures: 'The Royal Artillery at the Somme, 1916' 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The talk was part of a series of academic talks giving to the Royal Artillery as part of their annual Shrapnel Lecture series. The relevance of the lessons of the First World War for present day conflicts were discussed at length.
Many of the participants reported a desire for further information on the lessons of the First World War.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description School Visit to Baverstock Academy, 3 March as part of the "First World War Discovery Day". 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Pupils and staff were interested in my short talks, which talk a deliberately provocative standpoint and invited the students to challenge my arguments. Lively debate about the experience of the First World War followed. Student and staff feedback was universally positive.

School staff commented very favourably on the event. Several students have since visited open lectures at the University of Wolverhampton to continue their interest.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description School visit, Central Lancaster High School to Manchester Metropolitan University 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact 30+ pupils attended a day workshop and lectures on WW1. Feedback focused on the following: enjoyed hearing about what teenage life was like during the war; interested to hear that 250,000 children joined the war; liked lots of facts about the children; history is unusual and makes you think; people were executed in the war by their own side; statistics.
All agreed they'd learnt something they didn't know before. In feedback, most agreed they'd gained some skills that would help them do better in history.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Schools' visit to 'Lost Boys' exhibition Manchester Metropolitan University 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Visit by several schools to 'Lost Boys' exhibition on underage soldiers in the Holden Gallery at Manchester Metropolitan University. Positive response among the teachers and pupils who visited. Feedback included the following: 'Interested to hear about the age of the youngest boy to die in World War One'; 'learnt why young boys would join the army'; 'young boys joined the army due to pressure by government, family, friends and girls'; 'Christmas truce in 1914 - the Germans and British played a game of football'; 'die to propaganda many uneducated boys were influenced to join'; how and why children fought in the war'.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Screening Rights 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The event sparked discussions about the legacy of WW1.

Further conversations about future Screening Rights events were held.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Sharpnel Lectures Day School at Royal Artillery HQ, Larkhill 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact I spoke on the value of commemoration of the First World War for the British and Commonwealth Armies. Audience members were primarily from the British Army, with representatives from Australia, Canada and India also in attendance.

n/a
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Sisters of Manchester 1. Illustrated talk and opening event of a series of talks, workshops and films to celebrate to celebrate the centenary of women in Manchester campaigning for peace in 1915 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact An illustrated talk and opening event took place at Manchester Central Library which drew an audience of 90+ people and a slot on the regional BBC news programme 'North West Tonight'. The talk covered Manchester women's involvement in the signing of an Open Letter to Austrian and German women in the first winter of the war when a group of 101 pacifist and suffragist British women with international and European connections, woven in the pre-war activities of the International Suffrage Alliance, wrote an Open Letter to the women of Germany and Austria.

A concurrent digital exhibition 'Peace' is now on permanent display in Archives+ as part of the display Radical Manchester.

These talks and films coincided with the campaign to have a statue of Margaret Ashton in the City. There was a temporary exhibition about Ashton's pacifism, work as a councillor and as a women's rights/suffrage campaigner in Archives+

Dr Ali Ronan's booklet 'Unpopular Resistance' about the networks of anti-war and pacifist groups in Manchester and Salford 1914-1918, was subsequently published by the NW Labour History Society.

On the basis of pilot research done for the Sisters project, Dr Ali Ronan/ Manchester Centre for Regional History/Clapham Film Unit subsequently secured AHRC monies to work with local volunteers/historians to research and document in film, the astonishing wave of Women's Peace Crusades across the industrial towns of E. Lancashire during 1917-1918.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Sisters of Manchester 2. Short film called Spin it Back 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact We made a short film 'Spin it Back' with local young women from the Factory Youth Centre, north Manchester, and with young graduates from Manchester Metropolitan University which explored the anti-war activities of four young women from Manchester in 1914, (Mabel Phythian, Muriel Wallhead, Dorothy Smith and Kate Wallwork). The aim was to stimulate discussion and debate about war and the making of peace. The film has been shown to various audiences as part of the Sisters project and also to a very enthusiastic audience at the Archives in Douglas, Isle of Man where it was showcased as part of a 6th form History day.

The film is to be made available via the Voices of War and Peace website.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Sisters of Manchester 3. Short silent film 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact A short silent film about the open Letter to Austrian and German women written in the first winter of the war by a group of 101 pacifist and suffragist British women with international and European connections. Made with local young women from the Factory Youth Centre, north Manchester, and with young graduates from Manchester Metropolitan University. The film is part of the digital wall of exhibitions in Manchester Central Library.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Sisters of Manchester 4. Illustrated talk and film showing 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact An illustrated talk and film-showing at Manchester Central Library with Archives+ about Manchester's involvement in the pivotal Women's International Congress, which took place in The Hague in April 2015. The event was publicised through EventBrite and was sold out, with an audience of 100+. The film, These Dangerous Women, about the Congress of Women, had been funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund with the Women's History Network. It was made by the Clapham Film Unit and involved local women in the cast.

The film may be accessed on YouTube via this link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0a2xYvXwGiw&feature=youtu.be

The background to this event at the Library was as follows. In March 1915 several leading members of Manchester Suffrage Society established a break away branch of the newly- established British Committee of the International Congress of Women in order to elect delegates for the proposed Congress planned for The Hague in late April 1915. A local meeting in March 1915 elected Margaret Ashton, the pacifist suffragist Independent councillor, Sarah Dickenson, the Salford based trade union campaigner and Sarah Reddish from Bolton, trade union and suffrage activist. All these women were well known in their day and were established women's rights activists. All were in their 60s.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Sisters of Manchester 5. Film and archive session 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The final part of the Sisters project in December 2015 looked at the formation of the Women's International League in the city and premiered a short film about pacifist councillor Margaret Ashton's fall from grace in the City Council in 1917 when she was overtly anti-conscription and pro-peace. Ashton was the chairman of the local Women's International League federation in the North West: Manchester always had the highest numbers of WIL members, over 350 in 1916 growing to over 500 in 1918.

This final session involved an audience of 50+ and an opportunity to handle archive material. It was received enthusiastically and led to further discussions with the Manchester Centre for Regional History and the Clapham Film Unit to develop a project to work with local volunteers/historians to research and document in film, the astonishing wave of Women's Peace Crusades across the industrial towns of E. Lancashire during 1917-1918. This project has secured funding from the Voices of War and Peace Engagement Centre.
Plans
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Special screening of The First World War, Life on the Home Front in North West England, November 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Special screening of The First World War, Life on the Home Front in North West England, with introduction from Marion Hewitt, Director of the North West Film Archive at Manchester Metropolitan University (MMU). MMU Business School.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Stories of Omission volunteers' meeting 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact An initial meeting was held in order to recruit volunteer researchers for the Stories of Omission community research funded project. At the meeting we discussed the aims and objectives of the project and found out what the volunteers would be interested in researching. A series of follow up events will be held on a monthly basis from March until July.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Student placement 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Maeve Scally, a second year History student at the University of Birmingham, has been working with the Centre since September 2015 on a project called On This Day. Maeve has been researching and curating content to go on the Voices website, relating to the everyday experience of life in Birmingham during the First World War, drawing on local newspapers.
The work has been part of a 120 hour professional skills module organised by the University's Careers network which offers professional placements to undergraduate Arts & Humanities students. Maeve has contributed a large body of work to the Voices website and has developed her own skills, in particular, independent research skills, using primary source material, and writing for the web.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.voicesofwarandpeace.org/category/on-this-day/
 
Description Study Day: The Western Front in 1915, University of Wolverhampton, 3 January 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Three expert speakers gave papers on their area of expertise. (Dr. J. Krause, University of Portsmouth; Mr. Michael Woods, PhD student at University of Wolverhampton; Mr. Patrick Watt, PhD Student at University of Edinburgh). A panel discussion of the speakers followed, where they were joined by Dr. Spencer Jones, Professor Peter Simkins and Professor Stephen Badsey. A detailed and lively debate between the panellists and the audience followed. The idea of 'forgotten' battles and armies was prominent. The contribution of French forces and the Indian Army in 1915 were of particular interest to the audience.

Several members of the audience commented that they had learned a great deal from the day and there were numerous expressions of interest in inviting speakers to address local and national history groups.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.firstworldwarcentenary.co.uk/events/study-day-the-western-front-in-1915/
 
Description Study day on WW1 and medicine, injury and trauma 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact There was an in-depth and wide ranging discussion throughout the day where new information was shared.

Following the event an initial discussion has begun about encouraging and supporting new bids to the HLF for projects that will research and seek greater understanding of the experience of injured soldiers, both mental and physical. A scoping exercise into the holdings of Birmingham Archives, Heritage and Photography will be undertaken in 2015. Discussions to be followed up in 2015.
Feedback from some of the attendees included the following comments: 'I found all of the presentations incredibly interesting and engaging', 'Good range of topics and I liked the Q&A time afterwards', 'All talks were very useful and excellently presented'.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.voicesofwarandpeace.org/event/conference-first-world-war-and-injury-medicine-disability/
 
Description TV interview on local channel (Big Centre TV) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The interview allowed us to reach a wider audience.

None so far
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Talk & Taste: How the Pershore Plum won the Great War 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact This exhibition and talk explored how life changed for people in one Worcestershire town during the First World War. There were samples of WWI food to try accompanied by mulled wine, including jam made from the famous Pershore plums, a staple food for troops during the conflict.

It also provided an opportunity to see inside St. Swithun's Church, an impressive Grade I listed Georgian building located in the heart of Worcester. It has an outstanding interior, retaining all the furnishings of its time, including box pews, early English organ and rare three decker pulpit, and is currently the focus of a multi-million pound lottery bid.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Talk at the Green Jackets Museum, Winchester 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact A lively and thought-provoking debate between the speaker and the audience over many issues of the First World War and the Green Jackets participation in the conflict.

The Green Jackets Museum is unusually well-funded due to the securing of HLF Grants. Curators expressed interest in pursuing further funding through the Engagement Centre.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Talk on Women in Worcestershire in WWI to Worcester Wives Group 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Audience listened, and asked masses of questions

According to the follow up it stimulated thinking and ideas.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description The Acceptable Face of Feminism 100 years of WI History, Talk at Hay Literary Festival 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Lively discussion followed by significant media coverage in the Times and the Telegraph the next day and in the Guardian, Mail and some other newspaper websites, radio interviews with London Broadcast talk and BBC London - planned further talk on Irish Radio on 8 June. Added increase by general public and media in The Acceptable Face of Feminism book - including more copies sold and requests to talk elsewhere.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2016/may/31/wi-not-just-about-jam-jerusalem-author-maggie-andrews...
 
Description The John Terraine Lecture: The Battle of Mons Revisited, University of Birmingham, 28 April 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The John Terraine lecture is an annual event held at the University of Birmingham that seeks to expand on an aspect of the work of ground-breaking First World War historian John Terraine.

For this talk I offered a new interpretation of the first British battle of the war, Mons (23 August 1914), and engaged in a lively debate that focused upon the divergence between public memory and academic work.


A member of the audience expressed interest in undertaking a PhD on the topic of public / academic memory of the 1914 campaign. Discussions to follow later in the year.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description The Lowry, Manchester, First World War Centenary Family Event, 13/8/2014 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact We had an exhibition stand at this event, to help promote the project to children, their families, teachers and practitioners. The event was aimed at all ages.

The workshop introduced pupils to the ideas and issues surrounding the outbreak of World War One and gave school students a sense of what university teaching and learning involves, in a fun and inter-active way. The emphasis was on students receiving a positive and enjoyable learning experience that would raise their attainment and aspirations.

The event resulted 50 sign ups to our mailing list, which included, teachers, education practitioners and families.


93% of pupils said they found the workshop interesting and enjoyable and learnt something they didn't know before. 80% of pupils said they gained skills that would help them to do better in exams and felt more confident about their understanding of WW1. 67% said they felt more motivated to continue in education after finishing high school. 54% said they would consider studying at MMU in the future.

The following quotes are from pupils who attended:
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description The Space Between - Literature and Culture 1914-1945 Surveillance Conference, Keynote Panel, Montreal Canada 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Exchange of research discussion across national boundaries, most of conference attendees from USA and Canada.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://spacebetweensociety.org/conference/2016-conference/
 
Description Tiddsley Woods Open Day 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact There was lots of discussion and engagement, enthusiasm and interest - many now looking forward to future events, activities and publication of how the Pershore Plum won the Great War book.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://ww1inthevale.wordpress.com
 
Description Tom Palmer, Over the Line, at Manchester Children's Book Festival, 6/7/2014 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact The event, aimed at Years 5, 6 and 7, formed part of the final day of the Manchester Children's Book Festival 2014, when they joined author Tom Palmer as he presented his latest book Over the Line.

Over The Line is about a group of footballers who formed the famous Footballers' Battalion during WWI. One of them - Jack Cock - went on to play football for England after WWI, although he left many of his fellow players and soldiers fallen in France.

Tom talked about the WWI Footballers' Battalion and hosted a World Cup Reading Game, culminating in a penalty shoot out.

100% of attendess said they found it interesting and inspiring to meet and work with a published author. 50% said the event made them want to read more about World War One. The remaining 50% said it made them want to work harder at school.

The following are quotes from pupils who attended the event:
It was a great afternoon and I really enjoyed it.
Tom Palmer is great - he's open and very engaging. It was a top session.


Feedback from the event was very encouraging: 100% of attendees said they found it interesting and inspiring to meet and work with a published author. 50% said the event made them want to read more about World War One. The remaining 50% said it made them want to work harder at school. 50% said that the event made them think more about studying at university in the future.

The following are quotes from pupils who attended the event:
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Training day for Museum Volunteers at Avoncroft Museum, Bromsgrove, 17 March 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Increased understanding of the difference between popular and academic research and greater understanding of how the volunteers could engage with academic research.
Greater awareness of how to interrogate primary sources.

Now exploring with Avoncroft scope to do a small HLF grant bid for research around WW1 legacy on food consumption and production in the West Midlands.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Trenchfoot event 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Sunday, July 10th was set up to be a day of commemoration on the centenary of the Battle of Mametz Wood and we wanted to combine the event with the Whispers project. The Tin Shed in Laugharne houses a WW2 museum and doubles up as a music venue in its pole barn
out the back. At first it was family and friends who were invited. People that I knew had stories to tell. They were invited to the commemorative performance of Trenchfoot at The Shed. Alongside that we invited people prior to the performance to spend Sunday afternoon at the Shed telling stories of The Great War, whether it be a family story or other. People were encouraged to bring photos, as their stories would be videoed to start a collection that possibly could be then published on a You Tube channel or/and to the Peoples Collection.
Social media was plastered with posters and requests to come along. It was open to everyone. After getting no help from local or national press for the initiative I was still positive as so many people had agreed to turn up. As a supporter of the band, Trenchfoot, Frank Hennessey advertised the event on his Sunday evening folk programme which pulled in people I didn't know and with the help of local historical societies we were able to engender an interest in the event.
On the day over 100 people turned up. We were able to record 9 interviews on the afternoon and did another 5 on a separate day for those who couldn't make it on the Sunday. 10 to 15 people were nervous in front of the camera and turned down the offer of telling their story. I did
think of telling their story for them but it seemed the wrong thing to do and so we concentrated on the people who were relatively happy in front of the camera. While interviews were being recorded in the cottage at the bottom of the garden, performers were being recorded in the museum and throughout the afternoon/evening entertainment was both improvised and planned. Robert John sung WW1 marching songs, The Camel Club gave renditions of wartime songs and Luke Edwards, a virtuoso guitarist arranged wartime songs in a classical finger-picking style. He was joined by a member of the audience for Danny Boy. The early evening event was finished off by a 45 minute set of songs
from folk band Trenchfoot who gave their usual mix of heart rendering ballads and foot stomping up tempo
numbers that kept the capacity crowd singing along to original self-penned numbers about the 1914-18 period. In the middle of all this Jaye Swift, independent film producer and script writer from Barry, South Wales allowed us to show her short film, Letters Home, based on soldiers in the trenches, and their thoughts, just before going over the top on July 1st 1916.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Tweets from the Trenches workshop with Paul Cookson at St Peter's RC High School in Gorton, Manchester, 25/6/2014 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact The workshop, aimed at year Year 7, Key Stage 3 pupils, was intended to give pupils the opportunity of working with poet, Paul Cookson, to plan and deliver a WW1 performance that would take place at the National Football Museum on July 6th. The workshop enabled the pupils to create their own tweets from the trenches by drawing on existing WW1 poetry and by looking at soldiers' letters and diaries to help inspire ideas.

100% of students found the workshop interesting and enjoyable. 80% said the workshop made them want to read more about WW1.

Pupil comments:
Paul was really funny and entertaining

I am excited about performing at the National Football Museum




The workshop helped to raise pupils' attainment, aspirations and confidence. 100% of students found the workshop interesting and enjoyable. 80% said the workshop made them want to read more about WW1. 90% said the workshop made them feel more confident about their understanding of WW1. 50% said the workshop made them think more about studying at university in the future.

Pupil comments
"Paul was really funny and entertaining"
"I am excited
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Tweets from the Trenches workshop with Tony Walsh at the Albion Academy, Salford, 20/6/2014 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact The workshop was aimed at Year 7, Key Stage 3. It was intended to give pupils the opportunity of working with performance poet, Tony Walsh, to plan and deliver a WW1 performance that would take place at the Imperial War Museum North on July 6th. The workshop enabled them to create their own tweets from the trenches by drawing on existing WW1 poetry and by looking at soldiers' letter and diaries to help inspire ideas.
90% said they found the workshop interesting and enjoyable.
70% said the workshop made them want to read more about WW1
60% said that after the workshop they felt more confident about their understanding of WW1
Pupil comments
I really enjoyed working with the performance poet. I've never done anything like this before -thank you!
I don't really like poetry, but I did like creating tweets

The workshop helped to raise pupils' aspirations, attainment and confidence. 90% said they found the workshop interesting and enjoyable. 70% said the workshop made them want to read more about WW1. 60% said that after the workshop they felt more confident about their understanding of WW1. 45% said the workshop made them think more about studying at university in the future.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Untold Stories launch 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The People's Heritage Co-operative held an event to launch the learning guide they had produced for their project 'Untold Stories: Birmingham's wounded soldiers from WW1'. The project was supported by an HLF Understanding WW1 grant and the Voices centre.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Visit by Manchester school to WW1 event at Manchester Metropolitan University 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact A visit by pupils at a local Manchester high school to experience lectures and workshops delivered by university staff. Teacher feedback about how their pupils responded included the following: 'they learned how to listen in a lecture'; 'an excellent day all round and I learnt lots too'; 'opened their eyes'; 'a chance to find out more about the topic, experience the university and a chance to access different approaches to learning'
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Visit by Westhill School to event at Manchester Metropolitan University 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact c. 35-40 pupils attended a series of workshops and lectures at Manchester Metropolitan University which were intended to raise awareness of children's involvement in WW1. Feedback included the following comments:
'Learnt a lot about WW1 and the children who were involved in the battles'; 'learnt a lot about source analysis'; 'how the veterans are remembered'; 'due to propaganda many uneducated boys were influenced to join'; 'different sources, different views'; 'a lot about the war which could help me in school and later life and I also learn some skills to help me in school'; you have to look long and hard at a source to get all the information out of it'; 'Very fun and interesting day, thank you'; 'great day out, should do more days like these and i would recommend this'; 'enjoyed the trip as it was educating and fun at the same time'.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Visitor Work 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact A large quantity of qualitative data was gathered on people's responses to the travelling poppy exhibition at Woodhorn Museum.

Links to the Museum were strengthened. Further discussions with the curator and education officer about the impact of the installation and the community engagement work will take place before the end of this year. Potential contacts for follow-on project and bid to the research fund.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Visitor Work 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact A large quantity of qualitative data was gathered on people's responses to the travelling poppy exhibition at Yorkshire Sculpture Park.

Links to the Museum were strengthened. Further discussions with the curator and education officer about the impact of the installation and the community engagement work will take place before the end of this year. Potential contacts for follow-on project and bid to the WW1 EC research fund.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Visitor Work 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact A large quantity of qualitative data was gathered on people's responses to the travelling poppy exhibition at St Georges Hall, Liverpool
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Voices of the Home Fronts conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Voices of the Home Fronts was a conference held at the National Archives in London and jointly supported by the 5 Engagement Centres.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Volunteers Day 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The event was held to recruit volunteers for the project 'Quakers and the First World War: Lives & Legacies', funded by the Voices of War & Peace community research fund. 7 people attended and have agreed to become volunteers from the project.

Feedback during the event provided information about why the attendees had become involved. Responses included:
'I am interested in broader issues of belief and political attitudes, non-conformity and dissent', 'I have just completed an MA in Local History and am interested in expanding my knowledge and skills'.

Initial thoughts about being involved in a collaborative project included:
'Great idea, access to wider ideas and methodologies', 'I hope that it will be mutually beneficial'

Things people wanted to get from being involved in the project included:
'access to materials and sources, a sense of contributing to a bigger project and uncovering lost histories', 'would like to improve 21st C understanding of the moral outlooks of WW1 period'.

Skills people wanted to develop included:
archive research, social media, oral interviews, co-production with academics

when asked what people thought of the commemorations so far, comments included:
'a mixed bag of dreadful official commemoration and wider recuperation of a lot of hidden history', 'it has revealed areas of interest which are relatively unknown', 'a bit more wide-ranging than I'd expected it to be'.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Volunteers and Voters - Exhibition and Talk at the Hive 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact This was a talk designed to share the research of the Volunteers and Voters Project with the general public - there was a display of the exhibition also.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://volunteersandvoters.wordpress.com/2017/01/09/formidable-women-of-worcestershire-event/
 
Description Volunteers and Voters Conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact A Conference with the following talks
'Women and the Brave New World of Communal Dining, 1917-1919' - Dr Bryce Evans, Liverpool Hope University
To represent all the women of the city: Catharine Albright and the Birmingham Community Club' - Dr Si?n Roberts, University of Worcester
'Creating a Transatlantic Authority: A Canadian Woman in London, 1914-1918' - Dr Elizabeth Kirkland, Dawson College, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
'The First World War background of Devon's early women magistrates, with particular reference to service within the Devonshire Red Cross' - Dr Julia Neville, Exeter University
'Rural women, volunteer networks and the politics of food production during the First World War: The Women's War Agricultural Committees' - Dr Nicola Verdon, Sheffield Hallam University
'Voters and the Voteless: The 1918 franchise and working-class women in Birmingham' - Anna Muggeridge, University of Worcester

Now working towards an edited collection from conference - discussions already underway with Palgrave
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://volunteersandvoters.wordpress.com
 
Description WW1 at Xmas, event at Cardiff Story Museum 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Activity: Create your own Christmas postcard, based on this research - http://www.worldwar1postcards.com/christmas-postcards.php. We encouraged participants to write a message to a loved one who has been away for a long time - getting them to think about what they would write at this time of year.

When participants came in we did a quick explanation of what was happening 100 years and tried to encourage participants to imagine they were back in 1915, and what this meant (no television / computer games!, rationing, family members away fighting).

We also had our First World War dressing up costumes and all our worksheets out to continue to get participants thinking about the centenary, what war means at this time of year, roles of men and women etc.

From informal conversations with people who came along I think it's fair to say a lot of the young people who participated didn't really have awareness it was the centenary of the 1st WW (not covered by curriculum), it must have been scary (especially in the trenches), it's sad not having family together at this time of year, nice that children sent postcards and made their own decorations.

waiting for details
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Western Front Association Public Lecture: Leicester, "The Indian Army at War 1914-18" 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact A lively Q & A followed discussing the relevance of the Indian war effort for present day Indian communities living in Britain.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Whose War? Whose Memory? Teaching the First World War in International Perspective 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact For this event, we were joined by Professor Eckhardt Fuchs, Dr Barbara Christophe and Dr Kerstin Schwedes (TU Braunschweig), Dr Catriona Pennell (University of Exeter), and Peter Glasgow (Peace Pledge Union). Each presented on the subject of teaching the First World War in Britain and Germany. This was followed by an open discussion with the audience.

The event was jointly organised by Voices of War & Peace, the Institute for German Studies, DOMUS, the University of Northampton, and the Georg Eckert Institute for International Textbook Research.

The discussion was very stimulating and thought-provoking. Plans for future contact were made between the speakers and members of the audience.

The event was filmed and will be available soon on the Voices of War & Peace website.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.voicesofwarandpeace.org/portfolio/study-day-whose-war/
 
Description Worcestershire's Women: local studies and the gender politics of the Great War and its legacy Oxford First World War seminar series (Globalising and Localising the Great War) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact A seminar paper given to staff and postgrads based on research for Volunteers and Voters project
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://greatwar.history.ox.ac.uk/?page_id=2537
 
Description Work with Wales for Peace on walking tour and The Peace Map 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The walking tour was piloted at the Challenging History conference and 30 delegates were able to complete it. This is due to be launched for members of the public.

The Wales for Peace map has now been launched and we will ask for web stats on review.

The walking tour was well-received. The Peace Map has only recently been launched so feedback is minimal.

Extension of work between CI Kidd and the Wales for Peace project has been very valuable.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.walesforpeace.org/wfp/peacemap.html
 
Description Work with Whitchurch Hospital Historical Society 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact As part of the Challenging History conference we worked with the Historical Society to digitise part of their collection and put on a pop up exhibition at National Museum Cardiff, and in collaboration with St Fagans. We also co-organised a workshop as a part of the conference which was designed to help the Historical Society think about how to manage and promote their collection going forward. Cardiff University Special Collections were also involved in this activity.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Workshop on World War One with a local school, Staybridge, 18/12/2014 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact A workshop at Westhill School, Staybridge, Greater Manchester, including a talk and primary source work on various aspects of the First World War, including experiences, effects on individuals and consequences. The event was reported in the Staybridge Reporter and Chronicle, 18 December 2014.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description World War 1 Taster Session, Westhill High School, Tameside, Greater Manchester, 26/11/2014 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact The workshop introduced pupils (Year 9, Key Stage 3) to the ideas and issues surorunding the outbreak of World War One. The class gave school students a sense of what University teaching and learning involves, in a fun and inter-active way. The emphasis was on students receiving a positive and enjoyable learning experience that would raise their attainment and aspirations.

93% of pupils said they found the workshop interesting and enjoyable and learnt something they didn't know before.
80% of pupils said they gained skills that would help them to do better in exams and felt more confident about their understanding of WW1.

The following quotes are from pupils who attended: In the workshop I learnt more about universities and how they work with lectures for example. I also learnt about the first year of WW1 where at Christmas, the soldiers came together.

I learnt more about the world war than what I did know previously

I learnt how to critically analyse sources, and to give reasoning for suggestions

I would like to do this type of thing again


93% of pupils said they found the workshop interesting and enjoyable and learnt something they didn't know before. 80% of pupils said they gained skills that would help them to do better in exams and felt more confident about their understanding of WW1. 67% said they felt more motivated to continue in education after finishing high school. 54% said they would consider studying at MMU in the future.

The following quotes are from pupils who attended:
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description World War One and the Media 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Short presentation from Jessica Dromgoole, the Editor of Radio 4 drama series Home Front, Nicola Goodwin, a broadcast journalist with BBC Hereford and Worcester and one of the producers for the BBC's World War One at Home series, Prof. Maggie Andrews and Dr Chris Upton. There was lots of discussion, debate and questions from the audience.

Hard to measure (no information in original form)
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015