Farm animal genomics

Lead Research Organisation: University of Edinburgh
Department Name: The Roslin Institute

Abstract

We aim to deliver high quality annotated genomes for farmed animal species including the identification of functional elements. A high quality annotated reference genome sequence is critical to contemporary biological research. Draft reference genome sequences have been established for several farmed and companion animals (e.g. chicken, cattle, pig, horse, turkey and dog) and sequencing is well advanced for others (including sheep, duck, and salmon). Establishing its sequence is only the first step in characterising the genome of a species. Identifying the functional elements within a genome is essential for understanding the phenotypic consequences encoded in the genome sequence (cf. ENCODE which aims to identify all functional elements in the human genome sequence). The advent of so-called next-generation sequencing technologies has transformed the ease with which functional DNA elements can be identified on a genome-wide scale and dramatically reduced the costs of such experiments. Through our role in the leadership of farm animal genome projects (e.g. chicken, pig, sheep) we will promote the need for ENCODE-style functional annotation of farmed animal genomes and seek to establish frameworks a) to avoid unnecessary duplication of experiments and b) to share data. For example, as part of the Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium, we have already shared RNA-seq data among participating research groups. Our initial efforts to generate ENCODE-style data sets for farmed animals will focus on two cellular systems relevant to other Roslin research programmes: macrophages and stem cells.

Organisations

 
Description 1. We co-led the international Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium's efforts to establish a draft quality reference genome (Sscrofa10.2) for the pig, annotate, analyse and publish this pig genome. More recently, we led efforts to establish a very significantly improved pig reference genome sequence. This new assembly (Sscrofa11) is more than 500 times more contiguous than the earlier draft. The Sscrofa11 genome sequence has been released ahead of publication and is currently being analysed and annotated by collaborating groups around the world.

2. We jointly led the International Sheep Genomics Consortium to characterise the sheep genome and published a high-quality draft reference genome sequence and the pattern of gene expression across 40 tissues. This involved 73 authors and 27 institutions across 8 countries, with a substantial body of the sequence data generated by ARK-Genomics. The study identified genes associated with rumen evolution and lipid metabolism and will be the foundation of future research on ovine genetics, development and health.

3. We have been key initiators and leaders of the international Functional Annotation of Animal Genomes (FAANG) project to which over 350 scientists in over 25 countries have agreed to contribute to accelerate genome-to-phenome analysis. A paper describing the vision for the FAANG project has been published. Funding has been secured to deliver the Data Coordination Centre function for FAANG.

4. We have adapted Ensembl annotation pipelines to annotate the draft genomes of 46 avian species using the chicken genome as a reference for comparative analyses. These annotated genomes are freely accessible in an Ensembl genome browser via Avianbase, hosted by the National Avian Research Facility website. Analysis of these genomes by an international consortium involving over 50 institutions in 10 countries yielded two Science papers on avian genome evolution and adaptation.

5. We have developed genomics tools to enable genetics and genomics research and applications in farmed animals species. Specifically, we have developed DNA chips for assaying 100,000 to 650,000 variant single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) loci simultaneously for an animal. Such high density SNP chips were developed for chickens, Atlantic salmon and pigs.
Exploitation Route The genomics tools and resources developed within this project underpin on-going research in genetics and genomics in farmed animal species. The tools are also used by the animal breeding industry to improve the health and performance of farmed animals through selective breeding.
Sectors Agriculture, Food and Drink
 
Description Tools have been developed for genotyping 100,000 to 650,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms in parallel for DNA samples from pigs, cattle, chickens and salmon. These tools have been developed in collaboration with platform technology providers together with international academic partners and the animal breeding sector. These SNP chips have been deployed by animal breeding companies in the poultry, cattle, pig and aquaculture sectors to enable genomic selection.
First Year Of Impact 2013
Sector Agriculture, Food and Drink
Impact Types Economic
 
Description Bioinformatics and Biological Resources Fund
Amount £247,741 (GBP)
Funding ID BB/N019202/1 
Organisation Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK)
Start 11/2016 
End 10/2020
 
Description Bioinformatics and Biological Resources Fund
Amount £470,365 (GBP)
Funding ID BB/M011461/1 
Organisation Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK)
Start 08/2015 
End 07/2019
 
Description Comparison between maize-based and wheat-based diets on intestinal microbiome and intestinal gene expression after anticoccidial vaccine administration in broiler chickens
Amount £302,278 (GBP)
Organisation Industry Partners 
Sector Private
Country United States of America
Start 09/2016 
End 09/2019
 
Description Horizon 2020 Call H2020-SFS-2016-2
Amount € 407,153 (EUR)
Funding ID 727315 
Organisation European Union 
Sector Public
Country European Union (EU)
Start 05/2017 
End 04/2021
 
Description Mining new enzymes in the rumen for biomass processing and chiral synthesis
Amount £356,941 (GBP)
Funding ID 100970 
Organisation Technology Strategy Board (TSB) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK)
Start 08/2011 
End 01/2014
 
Description NERC Aquaculture Innovation Award
Amount £202,253 (GBP)
Funding ID NE/P010695/1 
Organisation Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK)
Start 01/2017 
End 12/2018
 
Description Newton International Fellowship
Amount £96,501 (GBP)
Funding ID NF160037 
Organisation British Council 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK)
Start 03/2017 
End 02/2019
 
Title Pig reference genome sequence Sscrofa11 
Description This pig genome sequence (Sscrofa11) has been released by the International Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium under the terms of the Toronto Statement (Nature 2009, 461: 168). The Consortium is coordinating genome-wide analysis, annotation and publication. The sequence data from which this assembly was constructed largely comprise 65x genome coverage in whole genome shotgun (WGS) Pacific Biosciences long reads (Pacific Biosciences RSII, with P6/C4 chemistry). Illumina HiSeq2500 WGS paired-end and mate pair reads were used for final error correction using PILON. Sanger and Oxford Nanopore sequence data from a few CHORI-242 BAC clones were used to fill gaps. All the WGS data were generated from a single Duroc female (TJ Tabasco, also known as Duroc 2-14) which was also the source of DNA for the CHORI-BAC library. Sscrofa11 replaces the previous assembly, Sscrofa10.2, which was largely established from the same Duroc 2-14 DNA source. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2016 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact The Sscrofa11 assembly has been updated recently to Sscrofa11.1 by the addition of the SSCY sequence data from Skinner et al. 2016 (Genome Res 26:130-9). The BAC and fosmid clone resource from Duroc 2-14 will facilitate further targeted sequence closure. These improved genome assemblies will be a key resource for research in pigs and will enable applications in agriculture and biomedicine. The SScrofa11.1 assembly is currently being analysed and annotated. 
URL https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/assembly/GCA_000003025.5/
 
Title Sheep mini tissue gene expression atlas 
Description Sheep total RNA was extracted from embryonic and adult tissues. Sequencing libraries were prepared from the RNA using the Illumina TruSeq stranded total RNA with the Ribo Zero gold option for the rRNA removal. The fragmentation in the standard protocol was modified to increase the average insert size in the library. Sequencing with 151 base paired end reads was performed on an Illumina HiSeq 2500 in rapid mode. These RNA-seq data were generated from 83 different adult and embryonic tissue / cell samples. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2014 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact These RNA-seq data were a key resource for the annotation of the draft sheep reference genome sequence (Oar_v3.1) and the associated genome paper (Jiang et al. 2014. Science 344:1168-73) and a subsequent paper by Xiang et al. 2016. PeerJ 4:e1762. 
URL https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/bioproject/PRJEB6169
 
Title Sheep reference genome sequence Oar_v3.1 
Description A single Texel ewe and a single Texel ram were sequenced and the 75-fold coverage by Illumina reads of the Texel ewe were assembled de novo into contigs and scaffolds with SOAPdenovo. Then 120-fold coverage Illumina sequences from both the ewe and the ram were used for a round of gap-filling. At this point, the N50 length of contigs was 18 kb, and the N50 length of the assembled scaffolds was 1.1Mb, achieving a total length of 2.64 Gb and leaving 6.9% gaps. This assembly was the previous Oar v2.0. The current assembly, Oar_v3.1, was created with another round of gap-filling by adding 21-fold coverage of GC content unbiased Illumina sequencing data from the male and 3 Gb MeDIP-seq for high GC content sequence from the female to the original datasets. Approximately 200,000 gaps were filled, including about 5000 that were filled using CHORI-243 BAC library sequences and 454 reads generated for the Oar v1.0 assembly (ACIV000000000, BioProject PRJNA33937). Segmental duplicates were identified by Whole Genome Assembly Comparison (WAGC), and their read coverage checked by GC content adjustment. Probable artificial tandem duplicates were identified using the larger insert 454 and BAC libraries and comparison to the UMD3 bovine genome assembly, and one copy of the tandem pairs was removed. The assembly of 775 overlapping scaffold ends were revised and these adjacent scaffold pairs were linked together. Artificial duplicated copies that had been generated by multiple gap-filling steps using gapcloser were removed, and erroneously assembled scaffolds identified during the error checking were manually split. A high-density RH map with 39,042 SNP markers and Ovine SNP50 genotyping linkage data were used to check scaffold integrity and to anchor scaffolds and super-scaffolds to chromosomes, leaving roughly 5700 unplaced scaffolds. Of the data cited above, the Illumina sequence data generated from the Texel ram were produced by the ARK-Genomics Centre for Comparative and Functional Genomics, The Roslin Institute, University of Edinburgh (now part of Edinburgh Genomics). 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2012 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact The generation, analysis and annotation of this draft sheep reference genome sequence was described in the sheep genome paper (Jiang et al. 2014. Science 344:1168-1173. As at 13 March 2017, this sheep genome paper has been cited 74 times. 
URL https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/assembly/GCF_000298735.1/
 
Title Whole genome sequence data from Texel ram 20118011 
Description The DNA of a male Texel sheep (20118011) was sequenced to great depth using a combination of different insert size libraries. Insert sizes of approximately 400 bp, and 700 bp were used for the bulk of the sequencing. An additional library of Illumina Mate paired inserts with an average insert size of 3.2kbp is included in the data set. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2014 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact These data contributed to the draft reference sheep genome sequence Oar_v3.1 (Jiang et al. 2014. Science 344:1168-73) and the sheep genome paper describing the analysis and annotation of the draft genome sequence. 
URL https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/bioproject/PRJEB6251
 
Description Centre for Tropical Livestock Genetics and Health 
Organisation International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI)
Country Kenya, Republic of 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution This project formed part of the establishment of a joint centre with ILRI to develop new approaches to improving the productivity of African Livestock
Collaborator Contribution There is a formal joint venture
Impact The Centre attracted funding from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. It is too early to identify outcomes, but the centre is fully functional and pursuing multiple collaborative projects
Start Year 2015
 
Description Collaboration with Cawthron Institute in New Zealand 
Organisation Cawthron Institute
Country New Zealand 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution This collaboration is built around a BBSRC partnering award in which I was the UK PI (BB/N022114/1 New Zealand - UK Paterning Award: Breeding for disease resistance in farmed oysters using genomic tools). The idea is to merge the genomic tools and skills that we have developed in the UK with the advanced shellfish selective breeding programmes that Cawthron run in New Zealand. Our research team has, for example, developed a high density SNP genotyping array for farmed oysters - the first of its kind for this species.
Collaborator Contribution Cawthron have world-leading selective breeding programmes for shellfish, including Pacific Oysters. One of the main target traits is to increase resistance to Oyster Herpes Virus (OHV) which can decimate stocks on oyster farms. They are providing our collaborative projects with access to extensive samples and data from their pedigreed oysters which have been challenged with OHV, in addition to their time to manage and run the project and provide intellectual input.
Impact Funded collaborative grant: NE/P010695/1 Application of genetic markers to improve resistance to herpes virus in commercial oyster populations This grant application builds on the BBSRC travel award and will provide funds for genotyping Cawthron's pedigreed oyster material with our high density SNP array developed under the BBSRC Aquaculture Initiative project BB/M026140/1 Investigation of Host Genetic Resistance to Oyster Herpes Virus using a High Density SNP Array. The downstream impact will be improved selective breeding for disease resistance in oysters, and transfer of much needed skills and expertise in advanced shellfish breeding from NZ to the UK. These collaborations also involve the Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (Cefas). The collaboration brings together expertise in genomics, sequencing, selective breeding, shellfish biology and virology.
Start Year 2016
 
Description Collaboration with University of Chile and AquaInnovo 
Organisation AquaChile
Country Chile, Republic of 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Chile is the second largest producer of Atlantic salmon in the world. This collaboration is based on research projects aimed at improving breeding for disease resistance in Chilean farmed salmon. The collaboration centres around a bilateral Newton project RCUK-CONICYT: Utilising functional genomic variation for improved disease resistance in Chilean salmon aquaculture. In this project, our team will run large-scale genomic analyses on disease challenged salmon samples, including from salmon challenged with sea lice and piscirickettsia salmonis - a major bacterial pathogen of salmon. This will include whole genome resequencing, analyses of differential gene expression profiles between resistant and susceptible fish, and genomic prediction analyses.
Collaborator Contribution The project partners (AquaChile and University of Chile) have provided access to over 5,000 samples from pedigreed Atlantic salmon stocks with associated data on sea lice and P. salmonis resistance. In addition, they provide significant practical and academic expertise to the collaboration.
Impact The outcomes of the collaboration to date have included training of postdoctoral researcher Diego Robledo in University of Chile in January 2017, and publications of peer-reviewed manuscripts: Genomics in aquaculture to better understand species biology and accelerate genetic progress. Jose M. Yáñez, Scott Newman, Ross D. Houston - 01 Apr 2015 - Frontiers in genetics Vol: 6. Genetics and genomics of disease resistance in salmonid species. José M Yáñez, Ross D Houston, Scott Newman - 2014 - Frontiers in genetics Vol: 5 Pages: 415 The future outcomes of the project will be improved methods of breeding for resistance to disease in Chilean salmon aquaculture. The collaboration includes quantitative genetics, disease biology, high throughput genomics / sequencing, and bioinformatics.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Collaboration with University of Chile and AquaInnovo 
Organisation University of Chile (Universidad de Chile)
Country Chile, Republic of 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Chile is the second largest producer of Atlantic salmon in the world. This collaboration is based on research projects aimed at improving breeding for disease resistance in Chilean farmed salmon. The collaboration centres around a bilateral Newton project RCUK-CONICYT: Utilising functional genomic variation for improved disease resistance in Chilean salmon aquaculture. In this project, our team will run large-scale genomic analyses on disease challenged salmon samples, including from salmon challenged with sea lice and piscirickettsia salmonis - a major bacterial pathogen of salmon. This will include whole genome resequencing, analyses of differential gene expression profiles between resistant and susceptible fish, and genomic prediction analyses.
Collaborator Contribution The project partners (AquaChile and University of Chile) have provided access to over 5,000 samples from pedigreed Atlantic salmon stocks with associated data on sea lice and P. salmonis resistance. In addition, they provide significant practical and academic expertise to the collaboration.
Impact The outcomes of the collaboration to date have included training of postdoctoral researcher Diego Robledo in University of Chile in January 2017, and publications of peer-reviewed manuscripts: Genomics in aquaculture to better understand species biology and accelerate genetic progress. Jose M. Yáñez, Scott Newman, Ross D. Houston - 01 Apr 2015 - Frontiers in genetics Vol: 6. Genetics and genomics of disease resistance in salmonid species. José M Yáñez, Ross D Houston, Scott Newman - 2014 - Frontiers in genetics Vol: 5 Pages: 415 The future outcomes of the project will be improved methods of breeding for resistance to disease in Chilean salmon aquaculture. The collaboration includes quantitative genetics, disease biology, high throughput genomics / sequencing, and bioinformatics.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Development of BAC probes for cytogenetic analysis in pigs 
Organisation University of Edinburgh
Department The Roslin Institute
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Roslin partner provided knowledge of the pig reference genome sequence (assembly Sscrofa10.2), the associated genomics resources (clones, sequences) in order to identify Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) clones which could be used as probes for the sub-telomeric and telomeric regions of pig chromosomes.
Collaborator Contribution The Kent partner has expertise in cytogenetic analyses, including the use of Fluorescent in situ Hybridisation (FISH).
Impact The partners have complementary skills in molecular genetics, sequence analysis, genomics and cytogenetics.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Development of BAC probes for cytogenetic analysis in pigs 
Organisation University of Kent
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Roslin partner provided knowledge of the pig reference genome sequence (assembly Sscrofa10.2), the associated genomics resources (clones, sequences) in order to identify Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) clones which could be used as probes for the sub-telomeric and telomeric regions of pig chromosomes.
Collaborator Contribution The Kent partner has expertise in cytogenetic analyses, including the use of Fluorescent in situ Hybridisation (FISH).
Impact The partners have complementary skills in molecular genetics, sequence analysis, genomics and cytogenetics.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Development of tools to detect chromosomal translocations in pigs 
Organisation Cytocell Ltd
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution I provided my detailed knowledge of the Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium's project that produced the draft pig reference genome sequence (Sscrofa10.2) as described by Groenen et al. 2012. Pig genomes provide insight into porcine demography and evolution. Nature 491: 393-398 and the pig physical mapping project as described by Humphray et al. 2007. A high utility integrated map of the pig genome. Genome Biology 8:R139. My research team had also established the bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library resource described by Anderson et al. 2000. A large fragment porcine genomic library resource in a BAC vector. Mammalian Genome 11, 811-814. BAC clones from this library were used as probes for fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH) experiments in this collaborative project. My knowledge of the pig physical mapping and pig genome sequencing projects was critical in interpreting the anomalous and unexpected results from the initial FISH experiments.
Collaborator Contribution This collaboration was initiated and led by Prof Darren Griffin and colleagues at the University of Kent. In addition to leading the collaboration the Kent team delivered the expertise in cytogenetics analysis. JSR Genetics provided animal materials and phenotypes. Cytocell Ltd provided technical expertise and the Chromoprobe Multiprobe System. The work was funded by an Innovate UK Knowledge Transfer Partnership to Prof Darren Griffin and Cytocell Ltd.
Impact The project has demonstrated that FISH-based translocation screening is a powerful and reliable approach to screening for chromosomal translocation that can have adverse effects on fertility. The device described by O'Connor et al. (see below) is now a commercial product marketed by Cytocell Ltd. The project results have been useful if anchoring the new improved pig reference genome sequence to chromosomes and confirming the order and orientation for each chromosomal sequence. The results of the study have been published by O'Connor et al. Isolation of subtelomeric sequences of porcine chromosomes for translocation screening reveals errors in the pig genome assembly. Animal Genetics (in press). The research undertaken by Rebecca O'Connor is a major component of her PhD research studies.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Development of tools to detect chromosomal translocations in pigs 
Organisation JSR Genetics
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution I provided my detailed knowledge of the Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium's project that produced the draft pig reference genome sequence (Sscrofa10.2) as described by Groenen et al. 2012. Pig genomes provide insight into porcine demography and evolution. Nature 491: 393-398 and the pig physical mapping project as described by Humphray et al. 2007. A high utility integrated map of the pig genome. Genome Biology 8:R139. My research team had also established the bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library resource described by Anderson et al. 2000. A large fragment porcine genomic library resource in a BAC vector. Mammalian Genome 11, 811-814. BAC clones from this library were used as probes for fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH) experiments in this collaborative project. My knowledge of the pig physical mapping and pig genome sequencing projects was critical in interpreting the anomalous and unexpected results from the initial FISH experiments.
Collaborator Contribution This collaboration was initiated and led by Prof Darren Griffin and colleagues at the University of Kent. In addition to leading the collaboration the Kent team delivered the expertise in cytogenetics analysis. JSR Genetics provided animal materials and phenotypes. Cytocell Ltd provided technical expertise and the Chromoprobe Multiprobe System. The work was funded by an Innovate UK Knowledge Transfer Partnership to Prof Darren Griffin and Cytocell Ltd.
Impact The project has demonstrated that FISH-based translocation screening is a powerful and reliable approach to screening for chromosomal translocation that can have adverse effects on fertility. The device described by O'Connor et al. (see below) is now a commercial product marketed by Cytocell Ltd. The project results have been useful if anchoring the new improved pig reference genome sequence to chromosomes and confirming the order and orientation for each chromosomal sequence. The results of the study have been published by O'Connor et al. Isolation of subtelomeric sequences of porcine chromosomes for translocation screening reveals errors in the pig genome assembly. Animal Genetics (in press). The research undertaken by Rebecca O'Connor is a major component of her PhD research studies.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Development of tools to detect chromosomal translocations in pigs 
Organisation University of Kent
Department Medway School of Pharmacy
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Hospitals 
PI Contribution I provided my detailed knowledge of the Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium's project that produced the draft pig reference genome sequence (Sscrofa10.2) as described by Groenen et al. 2012. Pig genomes provide insight into porcine demography and evolution. Nature 491: 393-398 and the pig physical mapping project as described by Humphray et al. 2007. A high utility integrated map of the pig genome. Genome Biology 8:R139. My research team had also established the bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library resource described by Anderson et al. 2000. A large fragment porcine genomic library resource in a BAC vector. Mammalian Genome 11, 811-814. BAC clones from this library were used as probes for fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH) experiments in this collaborative project. My knowledge of the pig physical mapping and pig genome sequencing projects was critical in interpreting the anomalous and unexpected results from the initial FISH experiments.
Collaborator Contribution This collaboration was initiated and led by Prof Darren Griffin and colleagues at the University of Kent. In addition to leading the collaboration the Kent team delivered the expertise in cytogenetics analysis. JSR Genetics provided animal materials and phenotypes. Cytocell Ltd provided technical expertise and the Chromoprobe Multiprobe System. The work was funded by an Innovate UK Knowledge Transfer Partnership to Prof Darren Griffin and Cytocell Ltd.
Impact The project has demonstrated that FISH-based translocation screening is a powerful and reliable approach to screening for chromosomal translocation that can have adverse effects on fertility. The device described by O'Connor et al. (see below) is now a commercial product marketed by Cytocell Ltd. The project results have been useful if anchoring the new improved pig reference genome sequence to chromosomes and confirming the order and orientation for each chromosomal sequence. The results of the study have been published by O'Connor et al. Isolation of subtelomeric sequences of porcine chromosomes for translocation screening reveals errors in the pig genome assembly. Animal Genetics (in press). The research undertaken by Rebecca O'Connor is a major component of her PhD research studies.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Functional Annotation of Animal Genomes (FAANG) 
Organisation AgResearch
Department Invermay Agricultural Centre
Country New Zealand 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution I was a major initiator of the Functional Annotation of Animal Genomes (FAANG) initiative. Initially this initiative was known as AgENCODE. Scientists at The Roslin Institute contribute to this collaboration through membership of the FAANG Steering Committee (A Archibald, D Burt, M Watson); the Animals, Samples and Assays committee (D Burt, E Clark, M McCulloch, J Smith, M Watson, R Young); the Bioinformatics and Data Analysis committee (M Watson (co-chair), D Burt, L Eory, R Kuo, M McCulloch); Communication (A Archibald, M Watson); and Metadata and Data Sharing committee (A Archibald, S Bush, E Clark, M Watson, R Young).
Collaborator Contribution The FAANG initiative is an open international collaborative project. The project partners are developing agreed standards for i) experiments to generate the data required for functional annotation of animal genomes, ii) meta data, iii) data analysis and iv) data sharing. A few partners have secured funding for pilot data generation efforts and are producing initial data sets. The partners at EMBL-European Bioinformatics Insitute are establishing the Data Coordination Centre (DCC) function for FAANG. The EMBL-EBI partners, together with A Archibald and D Burt at The Roslin Institute are seeking funding to support the DCC in the medium term.
Impact 280 scientists from around the world have identified themselves as contributors to FAANG. To date (March 2016) the listed collaborators are limited to those institutions from which the authors of the paper below are drawn. The FAANG Consortium published their vision for this collaborative venture (The FAANG Consortium, Andersson, L., Archibald, A.L., Bottema, C.D., Brauning, R., Burgess, S.C., Burt, D.W., Casas, E., Cheng, H.H., Clarke, L., Couldrey, C., Dalrymple, B.P., Elsik, C.G., Foissac, S., Giuffra, E., Groenen, M.A., Hayes, B.J., Huang, L.S., Khattib, H., Kijas, J.W., Kim, H., Lunney, J.K., McCarthy, F.M., McEwan, J.C., Moore, S., Nanduri, B., Notredame, C., Palti, Y., Plastow, G.S., Reecy, J.M., Rohrer, G.A., Sarrapoulu, E., Schmidt, C.J., Silverstein, J., Tellam, R.L., Tixier-Boichard, M., Tosser-Klop, G., Tuggle, C.K., Vilkki, J., White, S.N., Zhao, S. and Zhou, H., 2015. Coordinated international action to accelerate genome-to-phenome with FAANG, the Functional Annotation of Animal Genomes project. Genome Biology 16: 57). A workshop (GO-FAANG) to launch FAANG and to engage with potential funders was held at the US National Academy of Sciences, Washington DC over 7-8 October 2015. Funding has been secured to establish a COST Action Functional Annotation of Animal Genomes - European network (FAANG-Europe)) CA1152. A data sharing agreement has been completed and individuals who sign up as FAANG contributors are expected to comply with the data sharing agreement, including placing experimental data in the public domain in advance of publication. Further outcomes can be monitored through the FAANG web-site.
Start Year 2012
 
Description Functional Annotation of Animal Genomes (FAANG) 
Organisation EMBL European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL - EBI)
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I was a major initiator of the Functional Annotation of Animal Genomes (FAANG) initiative. Initially this initiative was known as AgENCODE. Scientists at The Roslin Institute contribute to this collaboration through membership of the FAANG Steering Committee (A Archibald, D Burt, M Watson); the Animals, Samples and Assays committee (D Burt, E Clark, M McCulloch, J Smith, M Watson, R Young); the Bioinformatics and Data Analysis committee (M Watson (co-chair), D Burt, L Eory, R Kuo, M McCulloch); Communication (A Archibald, M Watson); and Metadata and Data Sharing committee (A Archibald, S Bush, E Clark, M Watson, R Young).
Collaborator Contribution The FAANG initiative is an open international collaborative project. The project partners are developing agreed standards for i) experiments to generate the data required for functional annotation of animal genomes, ii) meta data, iii) data analysis and iv) data sharing. A few partners have secured funding for pilot data generation efforts and are producing initial data sets. The partners at EMBL-European Bioinformatics Insitute are establishing the Data Coordination Centre (DCC) function for FAANG. The EMBL-EBI partners, together with A Archibald and D Burt at The Roslin Institute are seeking funding to support the DCC in the medium term.
Impact 280 scientists from around the world have identified themselves as contributors to FAANG. To date (March 2016) the listed collaborators are limited to those institutions from which the authors of the paper below are drawn. The FAANG Consortium published their vision for this collaborative venture (The FAANG Consortium, Andersson, L., Archibald, A.L., Bottema, C.D., Brauning, R., Burgess, S.C., Burt, D.W., Casas, E., Cheng, H.H., Clarke, L., Couldrey, C., Dalrymple, B.P., Elsik, C.G., Foissac, S., Giuffra, E., Groenen, M.A., Hayes, B.J., Huang, L.S., Khattib, H., Kijas, J.W., Kim, H., Lunney, J.K., McCarthy, F.M., McEwan, J.C., Moore, S., Nanduri, B., Notredame, C., Palti, Y., Plastow, G.S., Reecy, J.M., Rohrer, G.A., Sarrapoulu, E., Schmidt, C.J., Silverstein, J., Tellam, R.L., Tixier-Boichard, M., Tosser-Klop, G., Tuggle, C.K., Vilkki, J., White, S.N., Zhao, S. and Zhou, H., 2015. Coordinated international action to accelerate genome-to-phenome with FAANG, the Functional Annotation of Animal Genomes project. Genome Biology 16: 57). A workshop (GO-FAANG) to launch FAANG and to engage with potential funders was held at the US National Academy of Sciences, Washington DC over 7-8 October 2015. Funding has been secured to establish a COST Action Functional Annotation of Animal Genomes - European network (FAANG-Europe)) CA1152. A data sharing agreement has been completed and individuals who sign up as FAANG contributors are expected to comply with the data sharing agreement, including placing experimental data in the public domain in advance of publication. Further outcomes can be monitored through the FAANG web-site.
Start Year 2012
 
Description Functional Annotation of Animal Genomes (FAANG) 
Organisation French National Institute of Agricultural Research (INRA)
Country France, French Republic 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution I was a major initiator of the Functional Annotation of Animal Genomes (FAANG) initiative. Initially this initiative was known as AgENCODE. Scientists at The Roslin Institute contribute to this collaboration through membership of the FAANG Steering Committee (A Archibald, D Burt, M Watson); the Animals, Samples and Assays committee (D Burt, E Clark, M McCulloch, J Smith, M Watson, R Young); the Bioinformatics and Data Analysis committee (M Watson (co-chair), D Burt, L Eory, R Kuo, M McCulloch); Communication (A Archibald, M Watson); and Metadata and Data Sharing committee (A Archibald, S Bush, E Clark, M Watson, R Young).
Collaborator Contribution The FAANG initiative is an open international collaborative project. The project partners are developing agreed standards for i) experiments to generate the data required for functional annotation of animal genomes, ii) meta data, iii) data analysis and iv) data sharing. A few partners have secured funding for pilot data generation efforts and are producing initial data sets. The partners at EMBL-European Bioinformatics Insitute are establishing the Data Coordination Centre (DCC) function for FAANG. The EMBL-EBI partners, together with A Archibald and D Burt at The Roslin Institute are seeking funding to support the DCC in the medium term.
Impact 280 scientists from around the world have identified themselves as contributors to FAANG. To date (March 2016) the listed collaborators are limited to those institutions from which the authors of the paper below are drawn. The FAANG Consortium published their vision for this collaborative venture (The FAANG Consortium, Andersson, L., Archibald, A.L., Bottema, C.D., Brauning, R., Burgess, S.C., Burt, D.W., Casas, E., Cheng, H.H., Clarke, L., Couldrey, C., Dalrymple, B.P., Elsik, C.G., Foissac, S., Giuffra, E., Groenen, M.A., Hayes, B.J., Huang, L.S., Khattib, H., Kijas, J.W., Kim, H., Lunney, J.K., McCarthy, F.M., McEwan, J.C., Moore, S., Nanduri, B., Notredame, C., Palti, Y., Plastow, G.S., Reecy, J.M., Rohrer, G.A., Sarrapoulu, E., Schmidt, C.J., Silverstein, J., Tellam, R.L., Tixier-Boichard, M., Tosser-Klop, G., Tuggle, C.K., Vilkki, J., White, S.N., Zhao, S. and Zhou, H., 2015. Coordinated international action to accelerate genome-to-phenome with FAANG, the Functional Annotation of Animal Genomes project. Genome Biology 16: 57). A workshop (GO-FAANG) to launch FAANG and to engage with potential funders was held at the US National Academy of Sciences, Washington DC over 7-8 October 2015. Funding has been secured to establish a COST Action Functional Annotation of Animal Genomes - European network (FAANG-Europe)) CA1152. A data sharing agreement has been completed and individuals who sign up as FAANG contributors are expected to comply with the data sharing agreement, including placing experimental data in the public domain in advance of publication. Further outcomes can be monitored through the FAANG web-site.
Start Year 2012
 
Description Functional Annotation of Animal Genomes (FAANG) 
Organisation Iowa State University
Country United States of America 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I was a major initiator of the Functional Annotation of Animal Genomes (FAANG) initiative. Initially this initiative was known as AgENCODE. Scientists at The Roslin Institute contribute to this collaboration through membership of the FAANG Steering Committee (A Archibald, D Burt, M Watson); the Animals, Samples and Assays committee (D Burt, E Clark, M McCulloch, J Smith, M Watson, R Young); the Bioinformatics and Data Analysis committee (M Watson (co-chair), D Burt, L Eory, R Kuo, M McCulloch); Communication (A Archibald, M Watson); and Metadata and Data Sharing committee (A Archibald, S Bush, E Clark, M Watson, R Young).
Collaborator Contribution The FAANG initiative is an open international collaborative project. The project partners are developing agreed standards for i) experiments to generate the data required for functional annotation of animal genomes, ii) meta data, iii) data analysis and iv) data sharing. A few partners have secured funding for pilot data generation efforts and are producing initial data sets. The partners at EMBL-European Bioinformatics Insitute are establishing the Data Coordination Centre (DCC) function for FAANG. The EMBL-EBI partners, together with A Archibald and D Burt at The Roslin Institute are seeking funding to support the DCC in the medium term.
Impact 280 scientists from around the world have identified themselves as contributors to FAANG. To date (March 2016) the listed collaborators are limited to those institutions from which the authors of the paper below are drawn. The FAANG Consortium published their vision for this collaborative venture (The FAANG Consortium, Andersson, L., Archibald, A.L., Bottema, C.D., Brauning, R., Burgess, S.C., Burt, D.W., Casas, E., Cheng, H.H., Clarke, L., Couldrey, C., Dalrymple, B.P., Elsik, C.G., Foissac, S., Giuffra, E., Groenen, M.A., Hayes, B.J., Huang, L.S., Khattib, H., Kijas, J.W., Kim, H., Lunney, J.K., McCarthy, F.M., McEwan, J.C., Moore, S., Nanduri, B., Notredame, C., Palti, Y., Plastow, G.S., Reecy, J.M., Rohrer, G.A., Sarrapoulu, E., Schmidt, C.J., Silverstein, J., Tellam, R.L., Tixier-Boichard, M., Tosser-Klop, G., Tuggle, C.K., Vilkki, J., White, S.N., Zhao, S. and Zhou, H., 2015. Coordinated international action to accelerate genome-to-phenome with FAANG, the Functional Annotation of Animal Genomes project. Genome Biology 16: 57). A workshop (GO-FAANG) to launch FAANG and to engage with potential funders was held at the US National Academy of Sciences, Washington DC over 7-8 October 2015. Funding has been secured to establish a COST Action Functional Annotation of Animal Genomes - European network (FAANG-Europe)) CA1152. A data sharing agreement has been completed and individuals who sign up as FAANG contributors are expected to comply with the data sharing agreement, including placing experimental data in the public domain in advance of publication. Further outcomes can be monitored through the FAANG web-site.
Start Year 2012
 
Description Functional Annotation of Animal Genomes (FAANG) 
Organisation Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
Country Sweden, Kingdom of 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I was a major initiator of the Functional Annotation of Animal Genomes (FAANG) initiative. Initially this initiative was known as AgENCODE. Scientists at The Roslin Institute contribute to this collaboration through membership of the FAANG Steering Committee (A Archibald, D Burt, M Watson); the Animals, Samples and Assays committee (D Burt, E Clark, M McCulloch, J Smith, M Watson, R Young); the Bioinformatics and Data Analysis committee (M Watson (co-chair), D Burt, L Eory, R Kuo, M McCulloch); Communication (A Archibald, M Watson); and Metadata and Data Sharing committee (A Archibald, S Bush, E Clark, M Watson, R Young).
Collaborator Contribution The FAANG initiative is an open international collaborative project. The project partners are developing agreed standards for i) experiments to generate the data required for functional annotation of animal genomes, ii) meta data, iii) data analysis and iv) data sharing. A few partners have secured funding for pilot data generation efforts and are producing initial data sets. The partners at EMBL-European Bioinformatics Insitute are establishing the Data Coordination Centre (DCC) function for FAANG. The EMBL-EBI partners, together with A Archibald and D Burt at The Roslin Institute are seeking funding to support the DCC in the medium term.
Impact 280 scientists from around the world have identified themselves as contributors to FAANG. To date (March 2016) the listed collaborators are limited to those institutions from which the authors of the paper below are drawn. The FAANG Consortium published their vision for this collaborative venture (The FAANG Consortium, Andersson, L., Archibald, A.L., Bottema, C.D., Brauning, R., Burgess, S.C., Burt, D.W., Casas, E., Cheng, H.H., Clarke, L., Couldrey, C., Dalrymple, B.P., Elsik, C.G., Foissac, S., Giuffra, E., Groenen, M.A., Hayes, B.J., Huang, L.S., Khattib, H., Kijas, J.W., Kim, H., Lunney, J.K., McCarthy, F.M., McEwan, J.C., Moore, S., Nanduri, B., Notredame, C., Palti, Y., Plastow, G.S., Reecy, J.M., Rohrer, G.A., Sarrapoulu, E., Schmidt, C.J., Silverstein, J., Tellam, R.L., Tixier-Boichard, M., Tosser-Klop, G., Tuggle, C.K., Vilkki, J., White, S.N., Zhao, S. and Zhou, H., 2015. Coordinated international action to accelerate genome-to-phenome with FAANG, the Functional Annotation of Animal Genomes project. Genome Biology 16: 57). A workshop (GO-FAANG) to launch FAANG and to engage with potential funders was held at the US National Academy of Sciences, Washington DC over 7-8 October 2015. Funding has been secured to establish a COST Action Functional Annotation of Animal Genomes - European network (FAANG-Europe)) CA1152. A data sharing agreement has been completed and individuals who sign up as FAANG contributors are expected to comply with the data sharing agreement, including placing experimental data in the public domain in advance of publication. Further outcomes can be monitored through the FAANG web-site.
Start Year 2012
 
Description Functional Annotation of Animal Genomes (FAANG) 
Organisation U.S. Department of Agriculture USDA
Department Avian Disease and Oncology Laboratory (ADOL)
Country United States of America 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution I was a major initiator of the Functional Annotation of Animal Genomes (FAANG) initiative. Initially this initiative was known as AgENCODE. Scientists at The Roslin Institute contribute to this collaboration through membership of the FAANG Steering Committee (A Archibald, D Burt, M Watson); the Animals, Samples and Assays committee (D Burt, E Clark, M McCulloch, J Smith, M Watson, R Young); the Bioinformatics and Data Analysis committee (M Watson (co-chair), D Burt, L Eory, R Kuo, M McCulloch); Communication (A Archibald, M Watson); and Metadata and Data Sharing committee (A Archibald, S Bush, E Clark, M Watson, R Young).
Collaborator Contribution The FAANG initiative is an open international collaborative project. The project partners are developing agreed standards for i) experiments to generate the data required for functional annotation of animal genomes, ii) meta data, iii) data analysis and iv) data sharing. A few partners have secured funding for pilot data generation efforts and are producing initial data sets. The partners at EMBL-European Bioinformatics Insitute are establishing the Data Coordination Centre (DCC) function for FAANG. The EMBL-EBI partners, together with A Archibald and D Burt at The Roslin Institute are seeking funding to support the DCC in the medium term.
Impact 280 scientists from around the world have identified themselves as contributors to FAANG. To date (March 2016) the listed collaborators are limited to those institutions from which the authors of the paper below are drawn. The FAANG Consortium published their vision for this collaborative venture (The FAANG Consortium, Andersson, L., Archibald, A.L., Bottema, C.D., Brauning, R., Burgess, S.C., Burt, D.W., Casas, E., Cheng, H.H., Clarke, L., Couldrey, C., Dalrymple, B.P., Elsik, C.G., Foissac, S., Giuffra, E., Groenen, M.A., Hayes, B.J., Huang, L.S., Khattib, H., Kijas, J.W., Kim, H., Lunney, J.K., McCarthy, F.M., McEwan, J.C., Moore, S., Nanduri, B., Notredame, C., Palti, Y., Plastow, G.S., Reecy, J.M., Rohrer, G.A., Sarrapoulu, E., Schmidt, C.J., Silverstein, J., Tellam, R.L., Tixier-Boichard, M., Tosser-Klop, G., Tuggle, C.K., Vilkki, J., White, S.N., Zhao, S. and Zhou, H., 2015. Coordinated international action to accelerate genome-to-phenome with FAANG, the Functional Annotation of Animal Genomes project. Genome Biology 16: 57). A workshop (GO-FAANG) to launch FAANG and to engage with potential funders was held at the US National Academy of Sciences, Washington DC over 7-8 October 2015. Funding has been secured to establish a COST Action Functional Annotation of Animal Genomes - European network (FAANG-Europe)) CA1152. A data sharing agreement has been completed and individuals who sign up as FAANG contributors are expected to comply with the data sharing agreement, including placing experimental data in the public domain in advance of publication. Further outcomes can be monitored through the FAANG web-site.
Start Year 2012
 
Description Functional Annotation of Animal Genomes (FAANG) 
Organisation USDA Agricultural Research Service, National Animal Diseases Center
Country United States of America 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution I was a major initiator of the Functional Annotation of Animal Genomes (FAANG) initiative. Initially this initiative was known as AgENCODE. Scientists at The Roslin Institute contribute to this collaboration through membership of the FAANG Steering Committee (A Archibald, D Burt, M Watson); the Animals, Samples and Assays committee (D Burt, E Clark, M McCulloch, J Smith, M Watson, R Young); the Bioinformatics and Data Analysis committee (M Watson (co-chair), D Burt, L Eory, R Kuo, M McCulloch); Communication (A Archibald, M Watson); and Metadata and Data Sharing committee (A Archibald, S Bush, E Clark, M Watson, R Young).
Collaborator Contribution The FAANG initiative is an open international collaborative project. The project partners are developing agreed standards for i) experiments to generate the data required for functional annotation of animal genomes, ii) meta data, iii) data analysis and iv) data sharing. A few partners have secured funding for pilot data generation efforts and are producing initial data sets. The partners at EMBL-European Bioinformatics Insitute are establishing the Data Coordination Centre (DCC) function for FAANG. The EMBL-EBI partners, together with A Archibald and D Burt at The Roslin Institute are seeking funding to support the DCC in the medium term.
Impact 280 scientists from around the world have identified themselves as contributors to FAANG. To date (March 2016) the listed collaborators are limited to those institutions from which the authors of the paper below are drawn. The FAANG Consortium published their vision for this collaborative venture (The FAANG Consortium, Andersson, L., Archibald, A.L., Bottema, C.D., Brauning, R., Burgess, S.C., Burt, D.W., Casas, E., Cheng, H.H., Clarke, L., Couldrey, C., Dalrymple, B.P., Elsik, C.G., Foissac, S., Giuffra, E., Groenen, M.A., Hayes, B.J., Huang, L.S., Khattib, H., Kijas, J.W., Kim, H., Lunney, J.K., McCarthy, F.M., McEwan, J.C., Moore, S., Nanduri, B., Notredame, C., Palti, Y., Plastow, G.S., Reecy, J.M., Rohrer, G.A., Sarrapoulu, E., Schmidt, C.J., Silverstein, J., Tellam, R.L., Tixier-Boichard, M., Tosser-Klop, G., Tuggle, C.K., Vilkki, J., White, S.N., Zhao, S. and Zhou, H., 2015. Coordinated international action to accelerate genome-to-phenome with FAANG, the Functional Annotation of Animal Genomes project. Genome Biology 16: 57). A workshop (GO-FAANG) to launch FAANG and to engage with potential funders was held at the US National Academy of Sciences, Washington DC over 7-8 October 2015. Funding has been secured to establish a COST Action Functional Annotation of Animal Genomes - European network (FAANG-Europe)) CA1152. A data sharing agreement has been completed and individuals who sign up as FAANG contributors are expected to comply with the data sharing agreement, including placing experimental data in the public domain in advance of publication. Further outcomes can be monitored through the FAANG web-site.
Start Year 2012
 
Description Functional Annotation of Animal Genomes (FAANG) 
Organisation University of Adelaide
Department School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences
Country Australia, Commonwealth of 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I was a major initiator of the Functional Annotation of Animal Genomes (FAANG) initiative. Initially this initiative was known as AgENCODE. Scientists at The Roslin Institute contribute to this collaboration through membership of the FAANG Steering Committee (A Archibald, D Burt, M Watson); the Animals, Samples and Assays committee (D Burt, E Clark, M McCulloch, J Smith, M Watson, R Young); the Bioinformatics and Data Analysis committee (M Watson (co-chair), D Burt, L Eory, R Kuo, M McCulloch); Communication (A Archibald, M Watson); and Metadata and Data Sharing committee (A Archibald, S Bush, E Clark, M Watson, R Young).
Collaborator Contribution The FAANG initiative is an open international collaborative project. The project partners are developing agreed standards for i) experiments to generate the data required for functional annotation of animal genomes, ii) meta data, iii) data analysis and iv) data sharing. A few partners have secured funding for pilot data generation efforts and are producing initial data sets. The partners at EMBL-European Bioinformatics Insitute are establishing the Data Coordination Centre (DCC) function for FAANG. The EMBL-EBI partners, together with A Archibald and D Burt at The Roslin Institute are seeking funding to support the DCC in the medium term.
Impact 280 scientists from around the world have identified themselves as contributors to FAANG. To date (March 2016) the listed collaborators are limited to those institutions from which the authors of the paper below are drawn. The FAANG Consortium published their vision for this collaborative venture (The FAANG Consortium, Andersson, L., Archibald, A.L., Bottema, C.D., Brauning, R., Burgess, S.C., Burt, D.W., Casas, E., Cheng, H.H., Clarke, L., Couldrey, C., Dalrymple, B.P., Elsik, C.G., Foissac, S., Giuffra, E., Groenen, M.A., Hayes, B.J., Huang, L.S., Khattib, H., Kijas, J.W., Kim, H., Lunney, J.K., McCarthy, F.M., McEwan, J.C., Moore, S., Nanduri, B., Notredame, C., Palti, Y., Plastow, G.S., Reecy, J.M., Rohrer, G.A., Sarrapoulu, E., Schmidt, C.J., Silverstein, J., Tellam, R.L., Tixier-Boichard, M., Tosser-Klop, G., Tuggle, C.K., Vilkki, J., White, S.N., Zhao, S. and Zhou, H., 2015. Coordinated international action to accelerate genome-to-phenome with FAANG, the Functional Annotation of Animal Genomes project. Genome Biology 16: 57). A workshop (GO-FAANG) to launch FAANG and to engage with potential funders was held at the US National Academy of Sciences, Washington DC over 7-8 October 2015. Funding has been secured to establish a COST Action Functional Annotation of Animal Genomes - European network (FAANG-Europe)) CA1152. A data sharing agreement has been completed and individuals who sign up as FAANG contributors are expected to comply with the data sharing agreement, including placing experimental data in the public domain in advance of publication. Further outcomes can be monitored through the FAANG web-site.
Start Year 2012
 
Description Functional Annotation of Animal Genomes (FAANG) 
Organisation University of California, Davis
Country United States of America 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I was a major initiator of the Functional Annotation of Animal Genomes (FAANG) initiative. Initially this initiative was known as AgENCODE. Scientists at The Roslin Institute contribute to this collaboration through membership of the FAANG Steering Committee (A Archibald, D Burt, M Watson); the Animals, Samples and Assays committee (D Burt, E Clark, M McCulloch, J Smith, M Watson, R Young); the Bioinformatics and Data Analysis committee (M Watson (co-chair), D Burt, L Eory, R Kuo, M McCulloch); Communication (A Archibald, M Watson); and Metadata and Data Sharing committee (A Archibald, S Bush, E Clark, M Watson, R Young).
Collaborator Contribution The FAANG initiative is an open international collaborative project. The project partners are developing agreed standards for i) experiments to generate the data required for functional annotation of animal genomes, ii) meta data, iii) data analysis and iv) data sharing. A few partners have secured funding for pilot data generation efforts and are producing initial data sets. The partners at EMBL-European Bioinformatics Insitute are establishing the Data Coordination Centre (DCC) function for FAANG. The EMBL-EBI partners, together with A Archibald and D Burt at The Roslin Institute are seeking funding to support the DCC in the medium term.
Impact 280 scientists from around the world have identified themselves as contributors to FAANG. To date (March 2016) the listed collaborators are limited to those institutions from which the authors of the paper below are drawn. The FAANG Consortium published their vision for this collaborative venture (The FAANG Consortium, Andersson, L., Archibald, A.L., Bottema, C.D., Brauning, R., Burgess, S.C., Burt, D.W., Casas, E., Cheng, H.H., Clarke, L., Couldrey, C., Dalrymple, B.P., Elsik, C.G., Foissac, S., Giuffra, E., Groenen, M.A., Hayes, B.J., Huang, L.S., Khattib, H., Kijas, J.W., Kim, H., Lunney, J.K., McCarthy, F.M., McEwan, J.C., Moore, S., Nanduri, B., Notredame, C., Palti, Y., Plastow, G.S., Reecy, J.M., Rohrer, G.A., Sarrapoulu, E., Schmidt, C.J., Silverstein, J., Tellam, R.L., Tixier-Boichard, M., Tosser-Klop, G., Tuggle, C.K., Vilkki, J., White, S.N., Zhao, S. and Zhou, H., 2015. Coordinated international action to accelerate genome-to-phenome with FAANG, the Functional Annotation of Animal Genomes project. Genome Biology 16: 57). A workshop (GO-FAANG) to launch FAANG and to engage with potential funders was held at the US National Academy of Sciences, Washington DC over 7-8 October 2015. Funding has been secured to establish a COST Action Functional Annotation of Animal Genomes - European network (FAANG-Europe)) CA1152. A data sharing agreement has been completed and individuals who sign up as FAANG contributors are expected to comply with the data sharing agreement, including placing experimental data in the public domain in advance of publication. Further outcomes can be monitored through the FAANG web-site.
Start Year 2012
 
Description Functional Annotation of Animal Genomes (FAANG) 
Organisation University of Wageningen
Country Netherlands, Kingdom of the 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I was a major initiator of the Functional Annotation of Animal Genomes (FAANG) initiative. Initially this initiative was known as AgENCODE. Scientists at The Roslin Institute contribute to this collaboration through membership of the FAANG Steering Committee (A Archibald, D Burt, M Watson); the Animals, Samples and Assays committee (D Burt, E Clark, M McCulloch, J Smith, M Watson, R Young); the Bioinformatics and Data Analysis committee (M Watson (co-chair), D Burt, L Eory, R Kuo, M McCulloch); Communication (A Archibald, M Watson); and Metadata and Data Sharing committee (A Archibald, S Bush, E Clark, M Watson, R Young).
Collaborator Contribution The FAANG initiative is an open international collaborative project. The project partners are developing agreed standards for i) experiments to generate the data required for functional annotation of animal genomes, ii) meta data, iii) data analysis and iv) data sharing. A few partners have secured funding for pilot data generation efforts and are producing initial data sets. The partners at EMBL-European Bioinformatics Insitute are establishing the Data Coordination Centre (DCC) function for FAANG. The EMBL-EBI partners, together with A Archibald and D Burt at The Roslin Institute are seeking funding to support the DCC in the medium term.
Impact 280 scientists from around the world have identified themselves as contributors to FAANG. To date (March 2016) the listed collaborators are limited to those institutions from which the authors of the paper below are drawn. The FAANG Consortium published their vision for this collaborative venture (The FAANG Consortium, Andersson, L., Archibald, A.L., Bottema, C.D., Brauning, R., Burgess, S.C., Burt, D.W., Casas, E., Cheng, H.H., Clarke, L., Couldrey, C., Dalrymple, B.P., Elsik, C.G., Foissac, S., Giuffra, E., Groenen, M.A., Hayes, B.J., Huang, L.S., Khattib, H., Kijas, J.W., Kim, H., Lunney, J.K., McCarthy, F.M., McEwan, J.C., Moore, S., Nanduri, B., Notredame, C., Palti, Y., Plastow, G.S., Reecy, J.M., Rohrer, G.A., Sarrapoulu, E., Schmidt, C.J., Silverstein, J., Tellam, R.L., Tixier-Boichard, M., Tosser-Klop, G., Tuggle, C.K., Vilkki, J., White, S.N., Zhao, S. and Zhou, H., 2015. Coordinated international action to accelerate genome-to-phenome with FAANG, the Functional Annotation of Animal Genomes project. Genome Biology 16: 57). A workshop (GO-FAANG) to launch FAANG and to engage with potential funders was held at the US National Academy of Sciences, Washington DC over 7-8 October 2015. Funding has been secured to establish a COST Action Functional Annotation of Animal Genomes - European network (FAANG-Europe)) CA1152. A data sharing agreement has been completed and individuals who sign up as FAANG contributors are expected to comply with the data sharing agreement, including placing experimental data in the public domain in advance of publication. Further outcomes can be monitored through the FAANG web-site.
Start Year 2012
 
Description Functional Annotation of Animal Genomes (FAANG) 
Organisation Uppsala University
Department Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology
Country Sweden, Kingdom of 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I was a major initiator of the Functional Annotation of Animal Genomes (FAANG) initiative. Initially this initiative was known as AgENCODE. Scientists at The Roslin Institute contribute to this collaboration through membership of the FAANG Steering Committee (A Archibald, D Burt, M Watson); the Animals, Samples and Assays committee (D Burt, E Clark, M McCulloch, J Smith, M Watson, R Young); the Bioinformatics and Data Analysis committee (M Watson (co-chair), D Burt, L Eory, R Kuo, M McCulloch); Communication (A Archibald, M Watson); and Metadata and Data Sharing committee (A Archibald, S Bush, E Clark, M Watson, R Young).
Collaborator Contribution The FAANG initiative is an open international collaborative project. The project partners are developing agreed standards for i) experiments to generate the data required for functional annotation of animal genomes, ii) meta data, iii) data analysis and iv) data sharing. A few partners have secured funding for pilot data generation efforts and are producing initial data sets. The partners at EMBL-European Bioinformatics Insitute are establishing the Data Coordination Centre (DCC) function for FAANG. The EMBL-EBI partners, together with A Archibald and D Burt at The Roslin Institute are seeking funding to support the DCC in the medium term.
Impact 280 scientists from around the world have identified themselves as contributors to FAANG. To date (March 2016) the listed collaborators are limited to those institutions from which the authors of the paper below are drawn. The FAANG Consortium published their vision for this collaborative venture (The FAANG Consortium, Andersson, L., Archibald, A.L., Bottema, C.D., Brauning, R., Burgess, S.C., Burt, D.W., Casas, E., Cheng, H.H., Clarke, L., Couldrey, C., Dalrymple, B.P., Elsik, C.G., Foissac, S., Giuffra, E., Groenen, M.A., Hayes, B.J., Huang, L.S., Khattib, H., Kijas, J.W., Kim, H., Lunney, J.K., McCarthy, F.M., McEwan, J.C., Moore, S., Nanduri, B., Notredame, C., Palti, Y., Plastow, G.S., Reecy, J.M., Rohrer, G.A., Sarrapoulu, E., Schmidt, C.J., Silverstein, J., Tellam, R.L., Tixier-Boichard, M., Tosser-Klop, G., Tuggle, C.K., Vilkki, J., White, S.N., Zhao, S. and Zhou, H., 2015. Coordinated international action to accelerate genome-to-phenome with FAANG, the Functional Annotation of Animal Genomes project. Genome Biology 16: 57). A workshop (GO-FAANG) to launch FAANG and to engage with potential funders was held at the US National Academy of Sciences, Washington DC over 7-8 October 2015. Funding has been secured to establish a COST Action Functional Annotation of Animal Genomes - European network (FAANG-Europe)) CA1152. A data sharing agreement has been completed and individuals who sign up as FAANG contributors are expected to comply with the data sharing agreement, including placing experimental data in the public domain in advance of publication. Further outcomes can be monitored through the FAANG web-site.
Start Year 2012
 
Description International Avian RNA-Seq Consortium 
Organisation Agrocampus Ouest
Country France, French Republic 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I organised the 6th International chick meeting, Edinburgh (2011) and also formed at that event the International Avian RNA-Seq Consortium. The purpose was to collaborate with national and international labs to pool RNA-seq data for the chicken (and other avian genomes). This data would provide a rich source of data for gene annotation of the chicken genome. This was used subsequently to annotate the chicken genes by the ENSEMBL gene annotation team, as part of our BBSRC funded work. We provided the organisation, advice for submission of data, provided early storage of data, and we provided all our data (20+ libraries).
Collaborator Contribution Many labs joined (21+) and one output was a joint publication and yearly updates to chicken genome.
Impact Jacqueline Smith, Bronwen L. Aken, Perry J. Blackshear, Shane C. Burgess, Amanda M. Cooksey, Dirk-Jan de Konig, Ian C. Dunn, Mario Fasold, Laure Frésard, David P. Froman, Valerie Garceau, Olivier Hanotte, Julien Häsler, David A. Hume, Pete Kaiser, Darek Kedra, Stephen J. Kemp, Richard Kuo, Sandrine Lagarrigue, Susan J. Lamont, Fiona M. McCarthy, Heather A. McCormack, Stefan A. Muljo, Andrea Münsterberg, Cedric Notredame, Harry Noyes, Andrew J. Oler, Sheila C. Ommeh, Helio Pais, Frédérique Pitel, Douglas D. Rhoads, Carl J. Schmidt, Matt Schwartz, Steve M. Searle, Michael A. Skinner, Peter F. Stadler, Cliff J. Tabin, Igor Ulitsky, Ying Wang, Huaijun Zhou, David W. Burt. (2015). In: "Chicken Genes and Chromosomes, Third Report 2015 (Editors: Schmid M., Smith J., Burt D.W.). The Avian RNASeq Consortium: a community effort to annotate the chicken genome. Cytogenetic and Genome Research 145, 83-88; DOI: 10.1159/isbn.978-3-318-05569-6.
Start Year 2011
 
Description International Avian RNA-Seq Consortium 
Organisation Arizona State University
Country United States of America 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I organised the 6th International chick meeting, Edinburgh (2011) and also formed at that event the International Avian RNA-Seq Consortium. The purpose was to collaborate with national and international labs to pool RNA-seq data for the chicken (and other avian genomes). This data would provide a rich source of data for gene annotation of the chicken genome. This was used subsequently to annotate the chicken genes by the ENSEMBL gene annotation team, as part of our BBSRC funded work. We provided the organisation, advice for submission of data, provided early storage of data, and we provided all our data (20+ libraries).
Collaborator Contribution Many labs joined (21+) and one output was a joint publication and yearly updates to chicken genome.
Impact Jacqueline Smith, Bronwen L. Aken, Perry J. Blackshear, Shane C. Burgess, Amanda M. Cooksey, Dirk-Jan de Konig, Ian C. Dunn, Mario Fasold, Laure Frésard, David P. Froman, Valerie Garceau, Olivier Hanotte, Julien Häsler, David A. Hume, Pete Kaiser, Darek Kedra, Stephen J. Kemp, Richard Kuo, Sandrine Lagarrigue, Susan J. Lamont, Fiona M. McCarthy, Heather A. McCormack, Stefan A. Muljo, Andrea Münsterberg, Cedric Notredame, Harry Noyes, Andrew J. Oler, Sheila C. Ommeh, Helio Pais, Frédérique Pitel, Douglas D. Rhoads, Carl J. Schmidt, Matt Schwartz, Steve M. Searle, Michael A. Skinner, Peter F. Stadler, Cliff J. Tabin, Igor Ulitsky, Ying Wang, Huaijun Zhou, David W. Burt. (2015). In: "Chicken Genes and Chromosomes, Third Report 2015 (Editors: Schmid M., Smith J., Burt D.W.). The Avian RNASeq Consortium: a community effort to annotate the chicken genome. Cytogenetic and Genome Research 145, 83-88; DOI: 10.1159/isbn.978-3-318-05569-6.
Start Year 2011
 
Description International Avian RNA-Seq Consortium 
Organisation EMBL European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL - EBI)
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I organised the 6th International chick meeting, Edinburgh (2011) and also formed at that event the International Avian RNA-Seq Consortium. The purpose was to collaborate with national and international labs to pool RNA-seq data for the chicken (and other avian genomes). This data would provide a rich source of data for gene annotation of the chicken genome. This was used subsequently to annotate the chicken genes by the ENSEMBL gene annotation team, as part of our BBSRC funded work. We provided the organisation, advice for submission of data, provided early storage of data, and we provided all our data (20+ libraries).
Collaborator Contribution Many labs joined (21+) and one output was a joint publication and yearly updates to chicken genome.
Impact Jacqueline Smith, Bronwen L. Aken, Perry J. Blackshear, Shane C. Burgess, Amanda M. Cooksey, Dirk-Jan de Konig, Ian C. Dunn, Mario Fasold, Laure Frésard, David P. Froman, Valerie Garceau, Olivier Hanotte, Julien Häsler, David A. Hume, Pete Kaiser, Darek Kedra, Stephen J. Kemp, Richard Kuo, Sandrine Lagarrigue, Susan J. Lamont, Fiona M. McCarthy, Heather A. McCormack, Stefan A. Muljo, Andrea Münsterberg, Cedric Notredame, Harry Noyes, Andrew J. Oler, Sheila C. Ommeh, Helio Pais, Frédérique Pitel, Douglas D. Rhoads, Carl J. Schmidt, Matt Schwartz, Steve M. Searle, Michael A. Skinner, Peter F. Stadler, Cliff J. Tabin, Igor Ulitsky, Ying Wang, Huaijun Zhou, David W. Burt. (2015). In: "Chicken Genes and Chromosomes, Third Report 2015 (Editors: Schmid M., Smith J., Burt D.W.). The Avian RNASeq Consortium: a community effort to annotate the chicken genome. Cytogenetic and Genome Research 145, 83-88; DOI: 10.1159/isbn.978-3-318-05569-6.
Start Year 2011
 
Description International Avian RNA-Seq Consortium 
Organisation French National Institute of Agricultural Research (INRA)
Department INRA Rennes Centre
Country France, French Republic 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution I organised the 6th International chick meeting, Edinburgh (2011) and also formed at that event the International Avian RNA-Seq Consortium. The purpose was to collaborate with national and international labs to pool RNA-seq data for the chicken (and other avian genomes). This data would provide a rich source of data for gene annotation of the chicken genome. This was used subsequently to annotate the chicken genes by the ENSEMBL gene annotation team, as part of our BBSRC funded work. We provided the organisation, advice for submission of data, provided early storage of data, and we provided all our data (20+ libraries).
Collaborator Contribution Many labs joined (21+) and one output was a joint publication and yearly updates to chicken genome.
Impact Jacqueline Smith, Bronwen L. Aken, Perry J. Blackshear, Shane C. Burgess, Amanda M. Cooksey, Dirk-Jan de Konig, Ian C. Dunn, Mario Fasold, Laure Frésard, David P. Froman, Valerie Garceau, Olivier Hanotte, Julien Häsler, David A. Hume, Pete Kaiser, Darek Kedra, Stephen J. Kemp, Richard Kuo, Sandrine Lagarrigue, Susan J. Lamont, Fiona M. McCarthy, Heather A. McCormack, Stefan A. Muljo, Andrea Münsterberg, Cedric Notredame, Harry Noyes, Andrew J. Oler, Sheila C. Ommeh, Helio Pais, Frédérique Pitel, Douglas D. Rhoads, Carl J. Schmidt, Matt Schwartz, Steve M. Searle, Michael A. Skinner, Peter F. Stadler, Cliff J. Tabin, Igor Ulitsky, Ying Wang, Huaijun Zhou, David W. Burt. (2015). In: "Chicken Genes and Chromosomes, Third Report 2015 (Editors: Schmid M., Smith J., Burt D.W.). The Avian RNASeq Consortium: a community effort to annotate the chicken genome. Cytogenetic and Genome Research 145, 83-88; DOI: 10.1159/isbn.978-3-318-05569-6.
Start Year 2011
 
Description International Avian RNA-Seq Consortium 
Organisation French National Institute of Agricultural Research (INRA)
Department INRA Toulouse
Country France, French Republic 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution I organised the 6th International chick meeting, Edinburgh (2011) and also formed at that event the International Avian RNA-Seq Consortium. The purpose was to collaborate with national and international labs to pool RNA-seq data for the chicken (and other avian genomes). This data would provide a rich source of data for gene annotation of the chicken genome. This was used subsequently to annotate the chicken genes by the ENSEMBL gene annotation team, as part of our BBSRC funded work. We provided the organisation, advice for submission of data, provided early storage of data, and we provided all our data (20+ libraries).
Collaborator Contribution Many labs joined (21+) and one output was a joint publication and yearly updates to chicken genome.
Impact Jacqueline Smith, Bronwen L. Aken, Perry J. Blackshear, Shane C. Burgess, Amanda M. Cooksey, Dirk-Jan de Konig, Ian C. Dunn, Mario Fasold, Laure Frésard, David P. Froman, Valerie Garceau, Olivier Hanotte, Julien Häsler, David A. Hume, Pete Kaiser, Darek Kedra, Stephen J. Kemp, Richard Kuo, Sandrine Lagarrigue, Susan J. Lamont, Fiona M. McCarthy, Heather A. McCormack, Stefan A. Muljo, Andrea Münsterberg, Cedric Notredame, Harry Noyes, Andrew J. Oler, Sheila C. Ommeh, Helio Pais, Frédérique Pitel, Douglas D. Rhoads, Carl J. Schmidt, Matt Schwartz, Steve M. Searle, Michael A. Skinner, Peter F. Stadler, Cliff J. Tabin, Igor Ulitsky, Ying Wang, Huaijun Zhou, David W. Burt. (2015). In: "Chicken Genes and Chromosomes, Third Report 2015 (Editors: Schmid M., Smith J., Burt D.W.). The Avian RNASeq Consortium: a community effort to annotate the chicken genome. Cytogenetic and Genome Research 145, 83-88; DOI: 10.1159/isbn.978-3-318-05569-6.
Start Year 2011
 
Description International Avian RNA-Seq Consortium 
Organisation Government of Catalonia
Department Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG)
Country Spain, Kingdom of 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I organised the 6th International chick meeting, Edinburgh (2011) and also formed at that event the International Avian RNA-Seq Consortium. The purpose was to collaborate with national and international labs to pool RNA-seq data for the chicken (and other avian genomes). This data would provide a rich source of data for gene annotation of the chicken genome. This was used subsequently to annotate the chicken genes by the ENSEMBL gene annotation team, as part of our BBSRC funded work. We provided the organisation, advice for submission of data, provided early storage of data, and we provided all our data (20+ libraries).
Collaborator Contribution Many labs joined (21+) and one output was a joint publication and yearly updates to chicken genome.
Impact Jacqueline Smith, Bronwen L. Aken, Perry J. Blackshear, Shane C. Burgess, Amanda M. Cooksey, Dirk-Jan de Konig, Ian C. Dunn, Mario Fasold, Laure Frésard, David P. Froman, Valerie Garceau, Olivier Hanotte, Julien Häsler, David A. Hume, Pete Kaiser, Darek Kedra, Stephen J. Kemp, Richard Kuo, Sandrine Lagarrigue, Susan J. Lamont, Fiona M. McCarthy, Heather A. McCormack, Stefan A. Muljo, Andrea Münsterberg, Cedric Notredame, Harry Noyes, Andrew J. Oler, Sheila C. Ommeh, Helio Pais, Frédérique Pitel, Douglas D. Rhoads, Carl J. Schmidt, Matt Schwartz, Steve M. Searle, Michael A. Skinner, Peter F. Stadler, Cliff J. Tabin, Igor Ulitsky, Ying Wang, Huaijun Zhou, David W. Burt. (2015). In: "Chicken Genes and Chromosomes, Third Report 2015 (Editors: Schmid M., Smith J., Burt D.W.). The Avian RNASeq Consortium: a community effort to annotate the chicken genome. Cytogenetic and Genome Research 145, 83-88; DOI: 10.1159/isbn.978-3-318-05569-6.
Start Year 2011
 
Description International Avian RNA-Seq Consortium 
Organisation Harvard University
Department Harvard Medical School
Country United States of America 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I organised the 6th International chick meeting, Edinburgh (2011) and also formed at that event the International Avian RNA-Seq Consortium. The purpose was to collaborate with national and international labs to pool RNA-seq data for the chicken (and other avian genomes). This data would provide a rich source of data for gene annotation of the chicken genome. This was used subsequently to annotate the chicken genes by the ENSEMBL gene annotation team, as part of our BBSRC funded work. We provided the organisation, advice for submission of data, provided early storage of data, and we provided all our data (20+ libraries).
Collaborator Contribution Many labs joined (21+) and one output was a joint publication and yearly updates to chicken genome.
Impact Jacqueline Smith, Bronwen L. Aken, Perry J. Blackshear, Shane C. Burgess, Amanda M. Cooksey, Dirk-Jan de Konig, Ian C. Dunn, Mario Fasold, Laure Frésard, David P. Froman, Valerie Garceau, Olivier Hanotte, Julien Häsler, David A. Hume, Pete Kaiser, Darek Kedra, Stephen J. Kemp, Richard Kuo, Sandrine Lagarrigue, Susan J. Lamont, Fiona M. McCarthy, Heather A. McCormack, Stefan A. Muljo, Andrea Münsterberg, Cedric Notredame, Harry Noyes, Andrew J. Oler, Sheila C. Ommeh, Helio Pais, Frédérique Pitel, Douglas D. Rhoads, Carl J. Schmidt, Matt Schwartz, Steve M. Searle, Michael A. Skinner, Peter F. Stadler, Cliff J. Tabin, Igor Ulitsky, Ying Wang, Huaijun Zhou, David W. Burt. (2015). In: "Chicken Genes and Chromosomes, Third Report 2015 (Editors: Schmid M., Smith J., Burt D.W.). The Avian RNASeq Consortium: a community effort to annotate the chicken genome. Cytogenetic and Genome Research 145, 83-88; DOI: 10.1159/isbn.978-3-318-05569-6.
Start Year 2011
 
Description International Avian RNA-Seq Consortium 
Organisation Imperial College London (ICL)
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I organised the 6th International chick meeting, Edinburgh (2011) and also formed at that event the International Avian RNA-Seq Consortium. The purpose was to collaborate with national and international labs to pool RNA-seq data for the chicken (and other avian genomes). This data would provide a rich source of data for gene annotation of the chicken genome. This was used subsequently to annotate the chicken genes by the ENSEMBL gene annotation team, as part of our BBSRC funded work. We provided the organisation, advice for submission of data, provided early storage of data, and we provided all our data (20+ libraries).
Collaborator Contribution Many labs joined (21+) and one output was a joint publication and yearly updates to chicken genome.
Impact Jacqueline Smith, Bronwen L. Aken, Perry J. Blackshear, Shane C. Burgess, Amanda M. Cooksey, Dirk-Jan de Konig, Ian C. Dunn, Mario Fasold, Laure Frésard, David P. Froman, Valerie Garceau, Olivier Hanotte, Julien Häsler, David A. Hume, Pete Kaiser, Darek Kedra, Stephen J. Kemp, Richard Kuo, Sandrine Lagarrigue, Susan J. Lamont, Fiona M. McCarthy, Heather A. McCormack, Stefan A. Muljo, Andrea Münsterberg, Cedric Notredame, Harry Noyes, Andrew J. Oler, Sheila C. Ommeh, Helio Pais, Frédérique Pitel, Douglas D. Rhoads, Carl J. Schmidt, Matt Schwartz, Steve M. Searle, Michael A. Skinner, Peter F. Stadler, Cliff J. Tabin, Igor Ulitsky, Ying Wang, Huaijun Zhou, David W. Burt. (2015). In: "Chicken Genes and Chromosomes, Third Report 2015 (Editors: Schmid M., Smith J., Burt D.W.). The Avian RNASeq Consortium: a community effort to annotate the chicken genome. Cytogenetic and Genome Research 145, 83-88; DOI: 10.1159/isbn.978-3-318-05569-6.
Start Year 2011
 
Description International Avian RNA-Seq Consortium 
Organisation Iowa State University
Country United States of America 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I organised the 6th International chick meeting, Edinburgh (2011) and also formed at that event the International Avian RNA-Seq Consortium. The purpose was to collaborate with national and international labs to pool RNA-seq data for the chicken (and other avian genomes). This data would provide a rich source of data for gene annotation of the chicken genome. This was used subsequently to annotate the chicken genes by the ENSEMBL gene annotation team, as part of our BBSRC funded work. We provided the organisation, advice for submission of data, provided early storage of data, and we provided all our data (20+ libraries).
Collaborator Contribution Many labs joined (21+) and one output was a joint publication and yearly updates to chicken genome.
Impact Jacqueline Smith, Bronwen L. Aken, Perry J. Blackshear, Shane C. Burgess, Amanda M. Cooksey, Dirk-Jan de Konig, Ian C. Dunn, Mario Fasold, Laure Frésard, David P. Froman, Valerie Garceau, Olivier Hanotte, Julien Häsler, David A. Hume, Pete Kaiser, Darek Kedra, Stephen J. Kemp, Richard Kuo, Sandrine Lagarrigue, Susan J. Lamont, Fiona M. McCarthy, Heather A. McCormack, Stefan A. Muljo, Andrea Münsterberg, Cedric Notredame, Harry Noyes, Andrew J. Oler, Sheila C. Ommeh, Helio Pais, Frédérique Pitel, Douglas D. Rhoads, Carl J. Schmidt, Matt Schwartz, Steve M. Searle, Michael A. Skinner, Peter F. Stadler, Cliff J. Tabin, Igor Ulitsky, Ying Wang, Huaijun Zhou, David W. Burt. (2015). In: "Chicken Genes and Chromosomes, Third Report 2015 (Editors: Schmid M., Smith J., Burt D.W.). The Avian RNASeq Consortium: a community effort to annotate the chicken genome. Cytogenetic and Genome Research 145, 83-88; DOI: 10.1159/isbn.978-3-318-05569-6.
Start Year 2011
 
Description International Avian RNA-Seq Consortium 
Organisation Kenya Agriculture & Livestock Research Organization (KALRO)
Country Kenya, Republic of 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution I organised the 6th International chick meeting, Edinburgh (2011) and also formed at that event the International Avian RNA-Seq Consortium. The purpose was to collaborate with national and international labs to pool RNA-seq data for the chicken (and other avian genomes). This data would provide a rich source of data for gene annotation of the chicken genome. This was used subsequently to annotate the chicken genes by the ENSEMBL gene annotation team, as part of our BBSRC funded work. We provided the organisation, advice for submission of data, provided early storage of data, and we provided all our data (20+ libraries).
Collaborator Contribution Many labs joined (21+) and one output was a joint publication and yearly updates to chicken genome.
Impact Jacqueline Smith, Bronwen L. Aken, Perry J. Blackshear, Shane C. Burgess, Amanda M. Cooksey, Dirk-Jan de Konig, Ian C. Dunn, Mario Fasold, Laure Frésard, David P. Froman, Valerie Garceau, Olivier Hanotte, Julien Häsler, David A. Hume, Pete Kaiser, Darek Kedra, Stephen J. Kemp, Richard Kuo, Sandrine Lagarrigue, Susan J. Lamont, Fiona M. McCarthy, Heather A. McCormack, Stefan A. Muljo, Andrea Münsterberg, Cedric Notredame, Harry Noyes, Andrew J. Oler, Sheila C. Ommeh, Helio Pais, Frédérique Pitel, Douglas D. Rhoads, Carl J. Schmidt, Matt Schwartz, Steve M. Searle, Michael A. Skinner, Peter F. Stadler, Cliff J. Tabin, Igor Ulitsky, Ying Wang, Huaijun Zhou, David W. Burt. (2015). In: "Chicken Genes and Chromosomes, Third Report 2015 (Editors: Schmid M., Smith J., Burt D.W.). The Avian RNASeq Consortium: a community effort to annotate the chicken genome. Cytogenetic and Genome Research 145, 83-88; DOI: 10.1159/isbn.978-3-318-05569-6.
Start Year 2011
 
Description International Avian RNA-Seq Consortium 
Organisation Medical Research Council (MRC) Centre Cambridge
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution I organised the 6th International chick meeting, Edinburgh (2011) and also formed at that event the International Avian RNA-Seq Consortium. The purpose was to collaborate with national and international labs to pool RNA-seq data for the chicken (and other avian genomes). This data would provide a rich source of data for gene annotation of the chicken genome. This was used subsequently to annotate the chicken genes by the ENSEMBL gene annotation team, as part of our BBSRC funded work. We provided the organisation, advice for submission of data, provided early storage of data, and we provided all our data (20+ libraries).
Collaborator Contribution Many labs joined (21+) and one output was a joint publication and yearly updates to chicken genome.
Impact Jacqueline Smith, Bronwen L. Aken, Perry J. Blackshear, Shane C. Burgess, Amanda M. Cooksey, Dirk-Jan de Konig, Ian C. Dunn, Mario Fasold, Laure Frésard, David P. Froman, Valerie Garceau, Olivier Hanotte, Julien Häsler, David A. Hume, Pete Kaiser, Darek Kedra, Stephen J. Kemp, Richard Kuo, Sandrine Lagarrigue, Susan J. Lamont, Fiona M. McCarthy, Heather A. McCormack, Stefan A. Muljo, Andrea Münsterberg, Cedric Notredame, Harry Noyes, Andrew J. Oler, Sheila C. Ommeh, Helio Pais, Frédérique Pitel, Douglas D. Rhoads, Carl J. Schmidt, Matt Schwartz, Steve M. Searle, Michael A. Skinner, Peter F. Stadler, Cliff J. Tabin, Igor Ulitsky, Ying Wang, Huaijun Zhou, David W. Burt. (2015). In: "Chicken Genes and Chromosomes, Third Report 2015 (Editors: Schmid M., Smith J., Burt D.W.). The Avian RNASeq Consortium: a community effort to annotate the chicken genome. Cytogenetic and Genome Research 145, 83-88; DOI: 10.1159/isbn.978-3-318-05569-6.
Start Year 2011
 
Description International Avian RNA-Seq Consortium 
Organisation National Institutes of Health (NIH)
Department National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)
Country United States of America 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution I organised the 6th International chick meeting, Edinburgh (2011) and also formed at that event the International Avian RNA-Seq Consortium. The purpose was to collaborate with national and international labs to pool RNA-seq data for the chicken (and other avian genomes). This data would provide a rich source of data for gene annotation of the chicken genome. This was used subsequently to annotate the chicken genes by the ENSEMBL gene annotation team, as part of our BBSRC funded work. We provided the organisation, advice for submission of data, provided early storage of data, and we provided all our data (20+ libraries).
Collaborator Contribution Many labs joined (21+) and one output was a joint publication and yearly updates to chicken genome.
Impact Jacqueline Smith, Bronwen L. Aken, Perry J. Blackshear, Shane C. Burgess, Amanda M. Cooksey, Dirk-Jan de Konig, Ian C. Dunn, Mario Fasold, Laure Frésard, David P. Froman, Valerie Garceau, Olivier Hanotte, Julien Häsler, David A. Hume, Pete Kaiser, Darek Kedra, Stephen J. Kemp, Richard Kuo, Sandrine Lagarrigue, Susan J. Lamont, Fiona M. McCarthy, Heather A. McCormack, Stefan A. Muljo, Andrea Münsterberg, Cedric Notredame, Harry Noyes, Andrew J. Oler, Sheila C. Ommeh, Helio Pais, Frédérique Pitel, Douglas D. Rhoads, Carl J. Schmidt, Matt Schwartz, Steve M. Searle, Michael A. Skinner, Peter F. Stadler, Cliff J. Tabin, Igor Ulitsky, Ying Wang, Huaijun Zhou, David W. Burt. (2015). In: "Chicken Genes and Chromosomes, Third Report 2015 (Editors: Schmid M., Smith J., Burt D.W.). The Avian RNASeq Consortium: a community effort to annotate the chicken genome. Cytogenetic and Genome Research 145, 83-88; DOI: 10.1159/isbn.978-3-318-05569-6.
Start Year 2011
 
Description International Avian RNA-Seq Consortium 
Organisation National Institutes of Health (NIH)
Department National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)
Country United States of America 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution I organised the 6th International chick meeting, Edinburgh (2011) and also formed at that event the International Avian RNA-Seq Consortium. The purpose was to collaborate with national and international labs to pool RNA-seq data for the chicken (and other avian genomes). This data would provide a rich source of data for gene annotation of the chicken genome. This was used subsequently to annotate the chicken genes by the ENSEMBL gene annotation team, as part of our BBSRC funded work. We provided the organisation, advice for submission of data, provided early storage of data, and we provided all our data (20+ libraries).
Collaborator Contribution Many labs joined (21+) and one output was a joint publication and yearly updates to chicken genome.
Impact Jacqueline Smith, Bronwen L. Aken, Perry J. Blackshear, Shane C. Burgess, Amanda M. Cooksey, Dirk-Jan de Konig, Ian C. Dunn, Mario Fasold, Laure Frésard, David P. Froman, Valerie Garceau, Olivier Hanotte, Julien Häsler, David A. Hume, Pete Kaiser, Darek Kedra, Stephen J. Kemp, Richard Kuo, Sandrine Lagarrigue, Susan J. Lamont, Fiona M. McCarthy, Heather A. McCormack, Stefan A. Muljo, Andrea Münsterberg, Cedric Notredame, Harry Noyes, Andrew J. Oler, Sheila C. Ommeh, Helio Pais, Frédérique Pitel, Douglas D. Rhoads, Carl J. Schmidt, Matt Schwartz, Steve M. Searle, Michael A. Skinner, Peter F. Stadler, Cliff J. Tabin, Igor Ulitsky, Ying Wang, Huaijun Zhou, David W. Burt. (2015). In: "Chicken Genes and Chromosomes, Third Report 2015 (Editors: Schmid M., Smith J., Burt D.W.). The Avian RNASeq Consortium: a community effort to annotate the chicken genome. Cytogenetic and Genome Research 145, 83-88; DOI: 10.1159/isbn.978-3-318-05569-6.
Start Year 2011
 
Description International Avian RNA-Seq Consortium 
Organisation Oregon State University
Country United States of America 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I organised the 6th International chick meeting, Edinburgh (2011) and also formed at that event the International Avian RNA-Seq Consortium. The purpose was to collaborate with national and international labs to pool RNA-seq data for the chicken (and other avian genomes). This data would provide a rich source of data for gene annotation of the chicken genome. This was used subsequently to annotate the chicken genes by the ENSEMBL gene annotation team, as part of our BBSRC funded work. We provided the organisation, advice for submission of data, provided early storage of data, and we provided all our data (20+ libraries).
Collaborator Contribution Many labs joined (21+) and one output was a joint publication and yearly updates to chicken genome.
Impact Jacqueline Smith, Bronwen L. Aken, Perry J. Blackshear, Shane C. Burgess, Amanda M. Cooksey, Dirk-Jan de Konig, Ian C. Dunn, Mario Fasold, Laure Frésard, David P. Froman, Valerie Garceau, Olivier Hanotte, Julien Häsler, David A. Hume, Pete Kaiser, Darek Kedra, Stephen J. Kemp, Richard Kuo, Sandrine Lagarrigue, Susan J. Lamont, Fiona M. McCarthy, Heather A. McCormack, Stefan A. Muljo, Andrea Münsterberg, Cedric Notredame, Harry Noyes, Andrew J. Oler, Sheila C. Ommeh, Helio Pais, Frédérique Pitel, Douglas D. Rhoads, Carl J. Schmidt, Matt Schwartz, Steve M. Searle, Michael A. Skinner, Peter F. Stadler, Cliff J. Tabin, Igor Ulitsky, Ying Wang, Huaijun Zhou, David W. Burt. (2015). In: "Chicken Genes and Chromosomes, Third Report 2015 (Editors: Schmid M., Smith J., Burt D.W.). The Avian RNASeq Consortium: a community effort to annotate the chicken genome. Cytogenetic and Genome Research 145, 83-88; DOI: 10.1159/isbn.978-3-318-05569-6.
Start Year 2011
 
Description International Avian RNA-Seq Consortium 
Organisation Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
Country Sweden, Kingdom of 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I organised the 6th International chick meeting, Edinburgh (2011) and also formed at that event the International Avian RNA-Seq Consortium. The purpose was to collaborate with national and international labs to pool RNA-seq data for the chicken (and other avian genomes). This data would provide a rich source of data for gene annotation of the chicken genome. This was used subsequently to annotate the chicken genes by the ENSEMBL gene annotation team, as part of our BBSRC funded work. We provided the organisation, advice for submission of data, provided early storage of data, and we provided all our data (20+ libraries).
Collaborator Contribution Many labs joined (21+) and one output was a joint publication and yearly updates to chicken genome.
Impact Jacqueline Smith, Bronwen L. Aken, Perry J. Blackshear, Shane C. Burgess, Amanda M. Cooksey, Dirk-Jan de Konig, Ian C. Dunn, Mario Fasold, Laure Frésard, David P. Froman, Valerie Garceau, Olivier Hanotte, Julien Häsler, David A. Hume, Pete Kaiser, Darek Kedra, Stephen J. Kemp, Richard Kuo, Sandrine Lagarrigue, Susan J. Lamont, Fiona M. McCarthy, Heather A. McCormack, Stefan A. Muljo, Andrea Münsterberg, Cedric Notredame, Harry Noyes, Andrew J. Oler, Sheila C. Ommeh, Helio Pais, Frédérique Pitel, Douglas D. Rhoads, Carl J. Schmidt, Matt Schwartz, Steve M. Searle, Michael A. Skinner, Peter F. Stadler, Cliff J. Tabin, Igor Ulitsky, Ying Wang, Huaijun Zhou, David W. Burt. (2015). In: "Chicken Genes and Chromosomes, Third Report 2015 (Editors: Schmid M., Smith J., Burt D.W.). The Avian RNASeq Consortium: a community effort to annotate the chicken genome. Cytogenetic and Genome Research 145, 83-88; DOI: 10.1159/isbn.978-3-318-05569-6.
Start Year 2011
 
Description International Avian RNA-Seq Consortium 
Organisation University of Arkansas
Country United States of America 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I organised the 6th International chick meeting, Edinburgh (2011) and also formed at that event the International Avian RNA-Seq Consortium. The purpose was to collaborate with national and international labs to pool RNA-seq data for the chicken (and other avian genomes). This data would provide a rich source of data for gene annotation of the chicken genome. This was used subsequently to annotate the chicken genes by the ENSEMBL gene annotation team, as part of our BBSRC funded work. We provided the organisation, advice for submission of data, provided early storage of data, and we provided all our data (20+ libraries).
Collaborator Contribution Many labs joined (21+) and one output was a joint publication and yearly updates to chicken genome.
Impact Jacqueline Smith, Bronwen L. Aken, Perry J. Blackshear, Shane C. Burgess, Amanda M. Cooksey, Dirk-Jan de Konig, Ian C. Dunn, Mario Fasold, Laure Frésard, David P. Froman, Valerie Garceau, Olivier Hanotte, Julien Häsler, David A. Hume, Pete Kaiser, Darek Kedra, Stephen J. Kemp, Richard Kuo, Sandrine Lagarrigue, Susan J. Lamont, Fiona M. McCarthy, Heather A. McCormack, Stefan A. Muljo, Andrea Münsterberg, Cedric Notredame, Harry Noyes, Andrew J. Oler, Sheila C. Ommeh, Helio Pais, Frédérique Pitel, Douglas D. Rhoads, Carl J. Schmidt, Matt Schwartz, Steve M. Searle, Michael A. Skinner, Peter F. Stadler, Cliff J. Tabin, Igor Ulitsky, Ying Wang, Huaijun Zhou, David W. Burt. (2015). In: "Chicken Genes and Chromosomes, Third Report 2015 (Editors: Schmid M., Smith J., Burt D.W.). The Avian RNASeq Consortium: a community effort to annotate the chicken genome. Cytogenetic and Genome Research 145, 83-88; DOI: 10.1159/isbn.978-3-318-05569-6.
Start Year 2011
 
Description International Avian RNA-Seq Consortium 
Organisation University of California, Davis
Department UC Davis Genome Cente
Country United States of America 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I organised the 6th International chick meeting, Edinburgh (2011) and also formed at that event the International Avian RNA-Seq Consortium. The purpose was to collaborate with national and international labs to pool RNA-seq data for the chicken (and other avian genomes). This data would provide a rich source of data for gene annotation of the chicken genome. This was used subsequently to annotate the chicken genes by the ENSEMBL gene annotation team, as part of our BBSRC funded work. We provided the organisation, advice for submission of data, provided early storage of data, and we provided all our data (20+ libraries).
Collaborator Contribution Many labs joined (21+) and one output was a joint publication and yearly updates to chicken genome.
Impact Jacqueline Smith, Bronwen L. Aken, Perry J. Blackshear, Shane C. Burgess, Amanda M. Cooksey, Dirk-Jan de Konig, Ian C. Dunn, Mario Fasold, Laure Frésard, David P. Froman, Valerie Garceau, Olivier Hanotte, Julien Häsler, David A. Hume, Pete Kaiser, Darek Kedra, Stephen J. Kemp, Richard Kuo, Sandrine Lagarrigue, Susan J. Lamont, Fiona M. McCarthy, Heather A. McCormack, Stefan A. Muljo, Andrea Münsterberg, Cedric Notredame, Harry Noyes, Andrew J. Oler, Sheila C. Ommeh, Helio Pais, Frédérique Pitel, Douglas D. Rhoads, Carl J. Schmidt, Matt Schwartz, Steve M. Searle, Michael A. Skinner, Peter F. Stadler, Cliff J. Tabin, Igor Ulitsky, Ying Wang, Huaijun Zhou, David W. Burt. (2015). In: "Chicken Genes and Chromosomes, Third Report 2015 (Editors: Schmid M., Smith J., Burt D.W.). The Avian RNASeq Consortium: a community effort to annotate the chicken genome. Cytogenetic and Genome Research 145, 83-88; DOI: 10.1159/isbn.978-3-318-05569-6.
Start Year 2011
 
Description International Avian RNA-Seq Consortium 
Organisation University of Delaware
Country United States of America 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I organised the 6th International chick meeting, Edinburgh (2011) and also formed at that event the International Avian RNA-Seq Consortium. The purpose was to collaborate with national and international labs to pool RNA-seq data for the chicken (and other avian genomes). This data would provide a rich source of data for gene annotation of the chicken genome. This was used subsequently to annotate the chicken genes by the ENSEMBL gene annotation team, as part of our BBSRC funded work. We provided the organisation, advice for submission of data, provided early storage of data, and we provided all our data (20+ libraries).
Collaborator Contribution Many labs joined (21+) and one output was a joint publication and yearly updates to chicken genome.
Impact Jacqueline Smith, Bronwen L. Aken, Perry J. Blackshear, Shane C. Burgess, Amanda M. Cooksey, Dirk-Jan de Konig, Ian C. Dunn, Mario Fasold, Laure Frésard, David P. Froman, Valerie Garceau, Olivier Hanotte, Julien Häsler, David A. Hume, Pete Kaiser, Darek Kedra, Stephen J. Kemp, Richard Kuo, Sandrine Lagarrigue, Susan J. Lamont, Fiona M. McCarthy, Heather A. McCormack, Stefan A. Muljo, Andrea Münsterberg, Cedric Notredame, Harry Noyes, Andrew J. Oler, Sheila C. Ommeh, Helio Pais, Frédérique Pitel, Douglas D. Rhoads, Carl J. Schmidt, Matt Schwartz, Steve M. Searle, Michael A. Skinner, Peter F. Stadler, Cliff J. Tabin, Igor Ulitsky, Ying Wang, Huaijun Zhou, David W. Burt. (2015). In: "Chicken Genes and Chromosomes, Third Report 2015 (Editors: Schmid M., Smith J., Burt D.W.). The Avian RNASeq Consortium: a community effort to annotate the chicken genome. Cytogenetic and Genome Research 145, 83-88; DOI: 10.1159/isbn.978-3-318-05569-6.
Start Year 2011
 
Description International Avian RNA-Seq Consortium 
Organisation University of East Anglia
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I organised the 6th International chick meeting, Edinburgh (2011) and also formed at that event the International Avian RNA-Seq Consortium. The purpose was to collaborate with national and international labs to pool RNA-seq data for the chicken (and other avian genomes). This data would provide a rich source of data for gene annotation of the chicken genome. This was used subsequently to annotate the chicken genes by the ENSEMBL gene annotation team, as part of our BBSRC funded work. We provided the organisation, advice for submission of data, provided early storage of data, and we provided all our data (20+ libraries).
Collaborator Contribution Many labs joined (21+) and one output was a joint publication and yearly updates to chicken genome.
Impact Jacqueline Smith, Bronwen L. Aken, Perry J. Blackshear, Shane C. Burgess, Amanda M. Cooksey, Dirk-Jan de Konig, Ian C. Dunn, Mario Fasold, Laure Frésard, David P. Froman, Valerie Garceau, Olivier Hanotte, Julien Häsler, David A. Hume, Pete Kaiser, Darek Kedra, Stephen J. Kemp, Richard Kuo, Sandrine Lagarrigue, Susan J. Lamont, Fiona M. McCarthy, Heather A. McCormack, Stefan A. Muljo, Andrea Münsterberg, Cedric Notredame, Harry Noyes, Andrew J. Oler, Sheila C. Ommeh, Helio Pais, Frédérique Pitel, Douglas D. Rhoads, Carl J. Schmidt, Matt Schwartz, Steve M. Searle, Michael A. Skinner, Peter F. Stadler, Cliff J. Tabin, Igor Ulitsky, Ying Wang, Huaijun Zhou, David W. Burt. (2015). In: "Chicken Genes and Chromosomes, Third Report 2015 (Editors: Schmid M., Smith J., Burt D.W.). The Avian RNASeq Consortium: a community effort to annotate the chicken genome. Cytogenetic and Genome Research 145, 83-88; DOI: 10.1159/isbn.978-3-318-05569-6.
Start Year 2011
 
Description International Avian RNA-Seq Consortium 
Organisation University of Leipzig
Country Germany, Federal Republic of 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I organised the 6th International chick meeting, Edinburgh (2011) and also formed at that event the International Avian RNA-Seq Consortium. The purpose was to collaborate with national and international labs to pool RNA-seq data for the chicken (and other avian genomes). This data would provide a rich source of data for gene annotation of the chicken genome. This was used subsequently to annotate the chicken genes by the ENSEMBL gene annotation team, as part of our BBSRC funded work. We provided the organisation, advice for submission of data, provided early storage of data, and we provided all our data (20+ libraries).
Collaborator Contribution Many labs joined (21+) and one output was a joint publication and yearly updates to chicken genome.
Impact Jacqueline Smith, Bronwen L. Aken, Perry J. Blackshear, Shane C. Burgess, Amanda M. Cooksey, Dirk-Jan de Konig, Ian C. Dunn, Mario Fasold, Laure Frésard, David P. Froman, Valerie Garceau, Olivier Hanotte, Julien Häsler, David A. Hume, Pete Kaiser, Darek Kedra, Stephen J. Kemp, Richard Kuo, Sandrine Lagarrigue, Susan J. Lamont, Fiona M. McCarthy, Heather A. McCormack, Stefan A. Muljo, Andrea Münsterberg, Cedric Notredame, Harry Noyes, Andrew J. Oler, Sheila C. Ommeh, Helio Pais, Frédérique Pitel, Douglas D. Rhoads, Carl J. Schmidt, Matt Schwartz, Steve M. Searle, Michael A. Skinner, Peter F. Stadler, Cliff J. Tabin, Igor Ulitsky, Ying Wang, Huaijun Zhou, David W. Burt. (2015). In: "Chicken Genes and Chromosomes, Third Report 2015 (Editors: Schmid M., Smith J., Burt D.W.). The Avian RNASeq Consortium: a community effort to annotate the chicken genome. Cytogenetic and Genome Research 145, 83-88; DOI: 10.1159/isbn.978-3-318-05569-6.
Start Year 2011
 
Description International Avian RNA-Seq Consortium 
Organisation University of Nottingham
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I organised the 6th International chick meeting, Edinburgh (2011) and also formed at that event the International Avian RNA-Seq Consortium. The purpose was to collaborate with national and international labs to pool RNA-seq data for the chicken (and other avian genomes). This data would provide a rich source of data for gene annotation of the chicken genome. This was used subsequently to annotate the chicken genes by the ENSEMBL gene annotation team, as part of our BBSRC funded work. We provided the organisation, advice for submission of data, provided early storage of data, and we provided all our data (20+ libraries).
Collaborator Contribution Many labs joined (21+) and one output was a joint publication and yearly updates to chicken genome.
Impact Jacqueline Smith, Bronwen L. Aken, Perry J. Blackshear, Shane C. Burgess, Amanda M. Cooksey, Dirk-Jan de Konig, Ian C. Dunn, Mario Fasold, Laure Frésard, David P. Froman, Valerie Garceau, Olivier Hanotte, Julien Häsler, David A. Hume, Pete Kaiser, Darek Kedra, Stephen J. Kemp, Richard Kuo, Sandrine Lagarrigue, Susan J. Lamont, Fiona M. McCarthy, Heather A. McCormack, Stefan A. Muljo, Andrea Münsterberg, Cedric Notredame, Harry Noyes, Andrew J. Oler, Sheila C. Ommeh, Helio Pais, Frédérique Pitel, Douglas D. Rhoads, Carl J. Schmidt, Matt Schwartz, Steve M. Searle, Michael A. Skinner, Peter F. Stadler, Cliff J. Tabin, Igor Ulitsky, Ying Wang, Huaijun Zhou, David W. Burt. (2015). In: "Chicken Genes and Chromosomes, Third Report 2015 (Editors: Schmid M., Smith J., Burt D.W.). The Avian RNASeq Consortium: a community effort to annotate the chicken genome. Cytogenetic and Genome Research 145, 83-88; DOI: 10.1159/isbn.978-3-318-05569-6.
Start Year 2011
 
Description International Avian RNA-Seq Consortium 
Organisation Weizmann Institute of Science
Country Israel, State of 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I organised the 6th International chick meeting, Edinburgh (2011) and also formed at that event the International Avian RNA-Seq Consortium. The purpose was to collaborate with national and international labs to pool RNA-seq data for the chicken (and other avian genomes). This data would provide a rich source of data for gene annotation of the chicken genome. This was used subsequently to annotate the chicken genes by the ENSEMBL gene annotation team, as part of our BBSRC funded work. We provided the organisation, advice for submission of data, provided early storage of data, and we provided all our data (20+ libraries).
Collaborator Contribution Many labs joined (21+) and one output was a joint publication and yearly updates to chicken genome.
Impact Jacqueline Smith, Bronwen L. Aken, Perry J. Blackshear, Shane C. Burgess, Amanda M. Cooksey, Dirk-Jan de Konig, Ian C. Dunn, Mario Fasold, Laure Frésard, David P. Froman, Valerie Garceau, Olivier Hanotte, Julien Häsler, David A. Hume, Pete Kaiser, Darek Kedra, Stephen J. Kemp, Richard Kuo, Sandrine Lagarrigue, Susan J. Lamont, Fiona M. McCarthy, Heather A. McCormack, Stefan A. Muljo, Andrea Münsterberg, Cedric Notredame, Harry Noyes, Andrew J. Oler, Sheila C. Ommeh, Helio Pais, Frédérique Pitel, Douglas D. Rhoads, Carl J. Schmidt, Matt Schwartz, Steve M. Searle, Michael A. Skinner, Peter F. Stadler, Cliff J. Tabin, Igor Ulitsky, Ying Wang, Huaijun Zhou, David W. Burt. (2015). In: "Chicken Genes and Chromosomes, Third Report 2015 (Editors: Schmid M., Smith J., Burt D.W.). The Avian RNASeq Consortium: a community effort to annotate the chicken genome. Cytogenetic and Genome Research 145, 83-88; DOI: 10.1159/isbn.978-3-318-05569-6.
Start Year 2011
 
Description International Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium 
Organisation Aarhus University Hospital
Country Denmark, Kingdom of 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Roslin Institute partner in the Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium contributed to the leadership of the pig genome sequencing project, coordination of analysis and annotation and writing the genome paper. On-going commitments to the SGSC include efforts to improve the reference genome sequence and assembly, including generating additional genome sequence data and ancillary sequence data for annotation.
Collaborator Contribution The other partners in the SGSC have contributed in multiple roles, including genome sequencing and analysis. The roles of each partner are recorded in the pig genome sequence paper as published in Nature in 2012 (Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398)
Impact The primary output from this collaborative partnership was the publication of the draft reference genome sequence of the pig (Sus scrofa) in Nature in November 2012. Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398 and associated companion papers. The genome sequence data are accessible in the public DNA sequence repositories and the annotated sequence can be accessed in the three main genome browsers (Ensembl, NCBI, UCSC). The SGSC has a continuing interest in improving the reference genome sequence. However, this task is mainly being pursued by the founding core partners.
 
Description International Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium 
Organisation Aberystwyth University
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Roslin Institute partner in the Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium contributed to the leadership of the pig genome sequencing project, coordination of analysis and annotation and writing the genome paper. On-going commitments to the SGSC include efforts to improve the reference genome sequence and assembly, including generating additional genome sequence data and ancillary sequence data for annotation.
Collaborator Contribution The other partners in the SGSC have contributed in multiple roles, including genome sequencing and analysis. The roles of each partner are recorded in the pig genome sequence paper as published in Nature in 2012 (Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398)
Impact The primary output from this collaborative partnership was the publication of the draft reference genome sequence of the pig (Sus scrofa) in Nature in November 2012. Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398 and associated companion papers. The genome sequence data are accessible in the public DNA sequence repositories and the annotated sequence can be accessed in the three main genome browsers (Ensembl, NCBI, UCSC). The SGSC has a continuing interest in improving the reference genome sequence. However, this task is mainly being pursued by the founding core partners.
 
Description International Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium 
Organisation Australian Government
Department National Health and Medical Research Council (Australia)
Country Australia, Commonwealth of 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution The Roslin Institute partner in the Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium contributed to the leadership of the pig genome sequencing project, coordination of analysis and annotation and writing the genome paper. On-going commitments to the SGSC include efforts to improve the reference genome sequence and assembly, including generating additional genome sequence data and ancillary sequence data for annotation.
Collaborator Contribution The other partners in the SGSC have contributed in multiple roles, including genome sequencing and analysis. The roles of each partner are recorded in the pig genome sequence paper as published in Nature in 2012 (Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398)
Impact The primary output from this collaborative partnership was the publication of the draft reference genome sequence of the pig (Sus scrofa) in Nature in November 2012. Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398 and associated companion papers. The genome sequence data are accessible in the public DNA sequence repositories and the annotated sequence can be accessed in the three main genome browsers (Ensembl, NCBI, UCSC). The SGSC has a continuing interest in improving the reference genome sequence. However, this task is mainly being pursued by the founding core partners.
 
Description International Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium 
Organisation Beijing Genomics Institute (BGI)
Country China, People's Republic of 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Roslin Institute partner in the Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium contributed to the leadership of the pig genome sequencing project, coordination of analysis and annotation and writing the genome paper. On-going commitments to the SGSC include efforts to improve the reference genome sequence and assembly, including generating additional genome sequence data and ancillary sequence data for annotation.
Collaborator Contribution The other partners in the SGSC have contributed in multiple roles, including genome sequencing and analysis. The roles of each partner are recorded in the pig genome sequence paper as published in Nature in 2012 (Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398)
Impact The primary output from this collaborative partnership was the publication of the draft reference genome sequence of the pig (Sus scrofa) in Nature in November 2012. Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398 and associated companion papers. The genome sequence data are accessible in the public DNA sequence repositories and the annotated sequence can be accessed in the three main genome browsers (Ensembl, NCBI, UCSC). The SGSC has a continuing interest in improving the reference genome sequence. However, this task is mainly being pursued by the founding core partners.
 
Description International Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium 
Organisation Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC)
Department Earlham Institute
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Roslin Institute partner in the Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium contributed to the leadership of the pig genome sequencing project, coordination of analysis and annotation and writing the genome paper. On-going commitments to the SGSC include efforts to improve the reference genome sequence and assembly, including generating additional genome sequence data and ancillary sequence data for annotation.
Collaborator Contribution The other partners in the SGSC have contributed in multiple roles, including genome sequencing and analysis. The roles of each partner are recorded in the pig genome sequence paper as published in Nature in 2012 (Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398)
Impact The primary output from this collaborative partnership was the publication of the draft reference genome sequence of the pig (Sus scrofa) in Nature in November 2012. Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398 and associated companion papers. The genome sequence data are accessible in the public DNA sequence repositories and the annotated sequence can be accessed in the three main genome browsers (Ensembl, NCBI, UCSC). The SGSC has a continuing interest in improving the reference genome sequence. However, this task is mainly being pursued by the founding core partners.
 
Description International Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium 
Organisation Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies (ICREA)
Department ICREA Centre for Research in Agricultural Genomics (CRAG)
Country Spain, Kingdom of 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Roslin Institute partner in the Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium contributed to the leadership of the pig genome sequencing project, coordination of analysis and annotation and writing the genome paper. On-going commitments to the SGSC include efforts to improve the reference genome sequence and assembly, including generating additional genome sequence data and ancillary sequence data for annotation.
Collaborator Contribution The other partners in the SGSC have contributed in multiple roles, including genome sequencing and analysis. The roles of each partner are recorded in the pig genome sequence paper as published in Nature in 2012 (Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398)
Impact The primary output from this collaborative partnership was the publication of the draft reference genome sequence of the pig (Sus scrofa) in Nature in November 2012. Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398 and associated companion papers. The genome sequence data are accessible in the public DNA sequence repositories and the annotated sequence can be accessed in the three main genome browsers (Ensembl, NCBI, UCSC). The SGSC has a continuing interest in improving the reference genome sequence. However, this task is mainly being pursued by the founding core partners.
 
Description International Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium 
Organisation Department of Medical Biochemistry
Department Science for Life Laboratory
Country Sweden, Kingdom of 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Roslin Institute partner in the Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium contributed to the leadership of the pig genome sequencing project, coordination of analysis and annotation and writing the genome paper. On-going commitments to the SGSC include efforts to improve the reference genome sequence and assembly, including generating additional genome sequence data and ancillary sequence data for annotation.
Collaborator Contribution The other partners in the SGSC have contributed in multiple roles, including genome sequencing and analysis. The roles of each partner are recorded in the pig genome sequence paper as published in Nature in 2012 (Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398)
Impact The primary output from this collaborative partnership was the publication of the draft reference genome sequence of the pig (Sus scrofa) in Nature in November 2012. Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398 and associated companion papers. The genome sequence data are accessible in the public DNA sequence repositories and the annotated sequence can be accessed in the three main genome browsers (Ensembl, NCBI, UCSC). The SGSC has a continuing interest in improving the reference genome sequence. However, this task is mainly being pursued by the founding core partners.
 
Description International Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium 
Organisation Durham University
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Roslin Institute partner in the Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium contributed to the leadership of the pig genome sequencing project, coordination of analysis and annotation and writing the genome paper. On-going commitments to the SGSC include efforts to improve the reference genome sequence and assembly, including generating additional genome sequence data and ancillary sequence data for annotation.
Collaborator Contribution The other partners in the SGSC have contributed in multiple roles, including genome sequencing and analysis. The roles of each partner are recorded in the pig genome sequence paper as published in Nature in 2012 (Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398)
Impact The primary output from this collaborative partnership was the publication of the draft reference genome sequence of the pig (Sus scrofa) in Nature in November 2012. Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398 and associated companion papers. The genome sequence data are accessible in the public DNA sequence repositories and the annotated sequence can be accessed in the three main genome browsers (Ensembl, NCBI, UCSC). The SGSC has a continuing interest in improving the reference genome sequence. However, this task is mainly being pursued by the founding core partners.
 
Description International Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium 
Organisation European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL)
Department European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI)
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Roslin Institute partner in the Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium contributed to the leadership of the pig genome sequencing project, coordination of analysis and annotation and writing the genome paper. On-going commitments to the SGSC include efforts to improve the reference genome sequence and assembly, including generating additional genome sequence data and ancillary sequence data for annotation.
Collaborator Contribution The other partners in the SGSC have contributed in multiple roles, including genome sequencing and analysis. The roles of each partner are recorded in the pig genome sequence paper as published in Nature in 2012 (Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398)
Impact The primary output from this collaborative partnership was the publication of the draft reference genome sequence of the pig (Sus scrofa) in Nature in November 2012. Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398 and associated companion papers. The genome sequence data are accessible in the public DNA sequence repositories and the annotated sequence can be accessed in the three main genome browsers (Ensembl, NCBI, UCSC). The SGSC has a continuing interest in improving the reference genome sequence. However, this task is mainly being pursued by the founding core partners.
 
Description International Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium 
Organisation Eversole Associates
Country United States of America 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution The Roslin Institute partner in the Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium contributed to the leadership of the pig genome sequencing project, coordination of analysis and annotation and writing the genome paper. On-going commitments to the SGSC include efforts to improve the reference genome sequence and assembly, including generating additional genome sequence data and ancillary sequence data for annotation.
Collaborator Contribution The other partners in the SGSC have contributed in multiple roles, including genome sequencing and analysis. The roles of each partner are recorded in the pig genome sequence paper as published in Nature in 2012 (Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398)
Impact The primary output from this collaborative partnership was the publication of the draft reference genome sequence of the pig (Sus scrofa) in Nature in November 2012. Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398 and associated companion papers. The genome sequence data are accessible in the public DNA sequence repositories and the annotated sequence can be accessed in the three main genome browsers (Ensembl, NCBI, UCSC). The SGSC has a continuing interest in improving the reference genome sequence. However, this task is mainly being pursued by the founding core partners.
 
Description International Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium 
Organisation French National Institute of Agricultural Research (INRA)
Department GABI: Animal Genetics and Integrative Biology unit
Country France, French Republic 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution The Roslin Institute partner in the Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium contributed to the leadership of the pig genome sequencing project, coordination of analysis and annotation and writing the genome paper. On-going commitments to the SGSC include efforts to improve the reference genome sequence and assembly, including generating additional genome sequence data and ancillary sequence data for annotation.
Collaborator Contribution The other partners in the SGSC have contributed in multiple roles, including genome sequencing and analysis. The roles of each partner are recorded in the pig genome sequence paper as published in Nature in 2012 (Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398)
Impact The primary output from this collaborative partnership was the publication of the draft reference genome sequence of the pig (Sus scrofa) in Nature in November 2012. Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398 and associated companion papers. The genome sequence data are accessible in the public DNA sequence repositories and the annotated sequence can be accessed in the three main genome browsers (Ensembl, NCBI, UCSC). The SGSC has a continuing interest in improving the reference genome sequence. However, this task is mainly being pursued by the founding core partners.
 
Description International Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium 
Organisation French National Institute of Agricultural Research (INRA)
Department Physiology of Reproduction and Behavior
Country France, French Republic 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution The Roslin Institute partner in the Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium contributed to the leadership of the pig genome sequencing project, coordination of analysis and annotation and writing the genome paper. On-going commitments to the SGSC include efforts to improve the reference genome sequence and assembly, including generating additional genome sequence data and ancillary sequence data for annotation.
Collaborator Contribution The other partners in the SGSC have contributed in multiple roles, including genome sequencing and analysis. The roles of each partner are recorded in the pig genome sequence paper as published in Nature in 2012 (Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398)
Impact The primary output from this collaborative partnership was the publication of the draft reference genome sequence of the pig (Sus scrofa) in Nature in November 2012. Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398 and associated companion papers. The genome sequence data are accessible in the public DNA sequence repositories and the annotated sequence can be accessed in the three main genome browsers (Ensembl, NCBI, UCSC). The SGSC has a continuing interest in improving the reference genome sequence. However, this task is mainly being pursued by the founding core partners.
 
Description International Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium 
Organisation French National Institute of Agricultural Research (INRA)
Country France, French Republic 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution The Roslin Institute partner in the Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium contributed to the leadership of the pig genome sequencing project, coordination of analysis and annotation and writing the genome paper. On-going commitments to the SGSC include efforts to improve the reference genome sequence and assembly, including generating additional genome sequence data and ancillary sequence data for annotation.
Collaborator Contribution The other partners in the SGSC have contributed in multiple roles, including genome sequencing and analysis. The roles of each partner are recorded in the pig genome sequence paper as published in Nature in 2012 (Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398)
Impact The primary output from this collaborative partnership was the publication of the draft reference genome sequence of the pig (Sus scrofa) in Nature in November 2012. Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398 and associated companion papers. The genome sequence data are accessible in the public DNA sequence repositories and the annotated sequence can be accessed in the three main genome browsers (Ensembl, NCBI, UCSC). The SGSC has a continuing interest in improving the reference genome sequence. However, this task is mainly being pursued by the founding core partners.
 
Description International Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium 
Organisation Genetic Information Research Institute
Country United States of America 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The Roslin Institute partner in the Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium contributed to the leadership of the pig genome sequencing project, coordination of analysis and annotation and writing the genome paper. On-going commitments to the SGSC include efforts to improve the reference genome sequence and assembly, including generating additional genome sequence data and ancillary sequence data for annotation.
Collaborator Contribution The other partners in the SGSC have contributed in multiple roles, including genome sequencing and analysis. The roles of each partner are recorded in the pig genome sequence paper as published in Nature in 2012 (Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398)
Impact The primary output from this collaborative partnership was the publication of the draft reference genome sequence of the pig (Sus scrofa) in Nature in November 2012. Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398 and associated companion papers. The genome sequence data are accessible in the public DNA sequence repositories and the annotated sequence can be accessed in the three main genome browsers (Ensembl, NCBI, UCSC). The SGSC has a continuing interest in improving the reference genome sequence. However, this task is mainly being pursued by the founding core partners.
 
Description International Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium 
Organisation Glasgow Caledonian University (GCU)
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Roslin Institute partner in the Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium contributed to the leadership of the pig genome sequencing project, coordination of analysis and annotation and writing the genome paper. On-going commitments to the SGSC include efforts to improve the reference genome sequence and assembly, including generating additional genome sequence data and ancillary sequence data for annotation.
Collaborator Contribution The other partners in the SGSC have contributed in multiple roles, including genome sequencing and analysis. The roles of each partner are recorded in the pig genome sequence paper as published in Nature in 2012 (Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398)
Impact The primary output from this collaborative partnership was the publication of the draft reference genome sequence of the pig (Sus scrofa) in Nature in November 2012. Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398 and associated companion papers. The genome sequence data are accessible in the public DNA sequence repositories and the annotated sequence can be accessed in the three main genome browsers (Ensembl, NCBI, UCSC). The SGSC has a continuing interest in improving the reference genome sequence. However, this task is mainly being pursued by the founding core partners.
 
Description International Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium 
Organisation Huazhong Agricultural University
Country China, People's Republic of 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Roslin Institute partner in the Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium contributed to the leadership of the pig genome sequencing project, coordination of analysis and annotation and writing the genome paper. On-going commitments to the SGSC include efforts to improve the reference genome sequence and assembly, including generating additional genome sequence data and ancillary sequence data for annotation.
Collaborator Contribution The other partners in the SGSC have contributed in multiple roles, including genome sequencing and analysis. The roles of each partner are recorded in the pig genome sequence paper as published in Nature in 2012 (Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398)
Impact The primary output from this collaborative partnership was the publication of the draft reference genome sequence of the pig (Sus scrofa) in Nature in November 2012. Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398 and associated companion papers. The genome sequence data are accessible in the public DNA sequence repositories and the annotated sequence can be accessed in the three main genome browsers (Ensembl, NCBI, UCSC). The SGSC has a continuing interest in improving the reference genome sequence. However, this task is mainly being pursued by the founding core partners.
 
Description International Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium 
Organisation Iowa State University
Country United States of America 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Roslin Institute partner in the Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium contributed to the leadership of the pig genome sequencing project, coordination of analysis and annotation and writing the genome paper. On-going commitments to the SGSC include efforts to improve the reference genome sequence and assembly, including generating additional genome sequence data and ancillary sequence data for annotation.
Collaborator Contribution The other partners in the SGSC have contributed in multiple roles, including genome sequencing and analysis. The roles of each partner are recorded in the pig genome sequence paper as published in Nature in 2012 (Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398)
Impact The primary output from this collaborative partnership was the publication of the draft reference genome sequence of the pig (Sus scrofa) in Nature in November 2012. Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398 and associated companion papers. The genome sequence data are accessible in the public DNA sequence repositories and the annotated sequence can be accessed in the three main genome browsers (Ensembl, NCBI, UCSC). The SGSC has a continuing interest in improving the reference genome sequence. However, this task is mainly being pursued by the founding core partners.
 
Description International Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium 
Organisation Jeju National University
Country Korea, Republic of 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Roslin Institute partner in the Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium contributed to the leadership of the pig genome sequencing project, coordination of analysis and annotation and writing the genome paper. On-going commitments to the SGSC include efforts to improve the reference genome sequence and assembly, including generating additional genome sequence data and ancillary sequence data for annotation.
Collaborator Contribution The other partners in the SGSC have contributed in multiple roles, including genome sequencing and analysis. The roles of each partner are recorded in the pig genome sequence paper as published in Nature in 2012 (Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398)
Impact The primary output from this collaborative partnership was the publication of the draft reference genome sequence of the pig (Sus scrofa) in Nature in November 2012. Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398 and associated companion papers. The genome sequence data are accessible in the public DNA sequence repositories and the annotated sequence can be accessed in the three main genome browsers (Ensembl, NCBI, UCSC). The SGSC has a continuing interest in improving the reference genome sequence. However, this task is mainly being pursued by the founding core partners.
 
Description International Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium 
Organisation Kansas State University
Country United States of America 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Roslin Institute partner in the Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium contributed to the leadership of the pig genome sequencing project, coordination of analysis and annotation and writing the genome paper. On-going commitments to the SGSC include efforts to improve the reference genome sequence and assembly, including generating additional genome sequence data and ancillary sequence data for annotation.
Collaborator Contribution The other partners in the SGSC have contributed in multiple roles, including genome sequencing and analysis. The roles of each partner are recorded in the pig genome sequence paper as published in Nature in 2012 (Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398)
Impact The primary output from this collaborative partnership was the publication of the draft reference genome sequence of the pig (Sus scrofa) in Nature in November 2012. Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398 and associated companion papers. The genome sequence data are accessible in the public DNA sequence repositories and the annotated sequence can be accessed in the three main genome browsers (Ensembl, NCBI, UCSC). The SGSC has a continuing interest in improving the reference genome sequence. However, this task is mainly being pursued by the founding core partners.
 
Description International Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium 
Organisation Konkuk University
Country Korea, Republic of 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Roslin Institute partner in the Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium contributed to the leadership of the pig genome sequencing project, coordination of analysis and annotation and writing the genome paper. On-going commitments to the SGSC include efforts to improve the reference genome sequence and assembly, including generating additional genome sequence data and ancillary sequence data for annotation.
Collaborator Contribution The other partners in the SGSC have contributed in multiple roles, including genome sequencing and analysis. The roles of each partner are recorded in the pig genome sequence paper as published in Nature in 2012 (Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398)
Impact The primary output from this collaborative partnership was the publication of the draft reference genome sequence of the pig (Sus scrofa) in Nature in November 2012. Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398 and associated companion papers. The genome sequence data are accessible in the public DNA sequence repositories and the annotated sequence can be accessed in the three main genome browsers (Ensembl, NCBI, UCSC). The SGSC has a continuing interest in improving the reference genome sequence. However, this task is mainly being pursued by the founding core partners.
 
Description International Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium 
Organisation Konkuk University
Country Korea, Republic of 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Roslin Institute partner in the Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium contributed to the leadership of the pig genome sequencing project, coordination of analysis and annotation and writing the genome paper. On-going commitments to the SGSC include efforts to improve the reference genome sequence and assembly, including generating additional genome sequence data and ancillary sequence data for annotation.
Collaborator Contribution The other partners in the SGSC have contributed in multiple roles, including genome sequencing and analysis. The roles of each partner are recorded in the pig genome sequence paper as published in Nature in 2012 (Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398)
Impact The primary output from this collaborative partnership was the publication of the draft reference genome sequence of the pig (Sus scrofa) in Nature in November 2012. Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398 and associated companion papers. The genome sequence data are accessible in the public DNA sequence repositories and the annotated sequence can be accessed in the three main genome browsers (Ensembl, NCBI, UCSC). The SGSC has a continuing interest in improving the reference genome sequence. However, this task is mainly being pursued by the founding core partners.
 
Description International Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium 
Organisation Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology (KRIBB)
Country Korea, Republic of 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Roslin Institute partner in the Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium contributed to the leadership of the pig genome sequencing project, coordination of analysis and annotation and writing the genome paper. On-going commitments to the SGSC include efforts to improve the reference genome sequence and assembly, including generating additional genome sequence data and ancillary sequence data for annotation.
Collaborator Contribution The other partners in the SGSC have contributed in multiple roles, including genome sequencing and analysis. The roles of each partner are recorded in the pig genome sequence paper as published in Nature in 2012 (Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398)
Impact The primary output from this collaborative partnership was the publication of the draft reference genome sequence of the pig (Sus scrofa) in Nature in November 2012. Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398 and associated companion papers. The genome sequence data are accessible in the public DNA sequence repositories and the annotated sequence can be accessed in the three main genome browsers (Ensembl, NCBI, UCSC). The SGSC has a continuing interest in improving the reference genome sequence. However, this task is mainly being pursued by the founding core partners.
 
Description International Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium 
Organisation National Institute of Agrobiological Science, Japan
Country Japan 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution The Roslin Institute partner in the Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium contributed to the leadership of the pig genome sequencing project, coordination of analysis and annotation and writing the genome paper. On-going commitments to the SGSC include efforts to improve the reference genome sequence and assembly, including generating additional genome sequence data and ancillary sequence data for annotation.
Collaborator Contribution The other partners in the SGSC have contributed in multiple roles, including genome sequencing and analysis. The roles of each partner are recorded in the pig genome sequence paper as published in Nature in 2012 (Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398)
Impact The primary output from this collaborative partnership was the publication of the draft reference genome sequence of the pig (Sus scrofa) in Nature in November 2012. Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398 and associated companion papers. The genome sequence data are accessible in the public DNA sequence repositories and the annotated sequence can be accessed in the three main genome browsers (Ensembl, NCBI, UCSC). The SGSC has a continuing interest in improving the reference genome sequence. However, this task is mainly being pursued by the founding core partners.
 
Description International Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium 
Organisation National Institute of Animal Science, Korea
Country Korea, Republic of 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution The Roslin Institute partner in the Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium contributed to the leadership of the pig genome sequencing project, coordination of analysis and annotation and writing the genome paper. On-going commitments to the SGSC include efforts to improve the reference genome sequence and assembly, including generating additional genome sequence data and ancillary sequence data for annotation.
Collaborator Contribution The other partners in the SGSC have contributed in multiple roles, including genome sequencing and analysis. The roles of each partner are recorded in the pig genome sequence paper as published in Nature in 2012 (Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398)
Impact The primary output from this collaborative partnership was the publication of the draft reference genome sequence of the pig (Sus scrofa) in Nature in November 2012. Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398 and associated companion papers. The genome sequence data are accessible in the public DNA sequence repositories and the annotated sequence can be accessed in the three main genome browsers (Ensembl, NCBI, UCSC). The SGSC has a continuing interest in improving the reference genome sequence. However, this task is mainly being pursued by the founding core partners.
 
Description International Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium 
Organisation National Institute of Animal Science, Korea
Country Korea, Republic of 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution The Roslin Institute partner in the Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium contributed to the leadership of the pig genome sequencing project, coordination of analysis and annotation and writing the genome paper. On-going commitments to the SGSC include efforts to improve the reference genome sequence and assembly, including generating additional genome sequence data and ancillary sequence data for annotation.
Collaborator Contribution The other partners in the SGSC have contributed in multiple roles, including genome sequencing and analysis. The roles of each partner are recorded in the pig genome sequence paper as published in Nature in 2012 (Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398)
Impact The primary output from this collaborative partnership was the publication of the draft reference genome sequence of the pig (Sus scrofa) in Nature in November 2012. Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398 and associated companion papers. The genome sequence data are accessible in the public DNA sequence repositories and the annotated sequence can be accessed in the three main genome browsers (Ensembl, NCBI, UCSC). The SGSC has a continuing interest in improving the reference genome sequence. However, this task is mainly being pursued by the founding core partners.
 
Description International Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium 
Organisation Parco Tecnologico Padano
Country Italy, Italian Republic 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution The Roslin Institute partner in the Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium contributed to the leadership of the pig genome sequencing project, coordination of analysis and annotation and writing the genome paper. On-going commitments to the SGSC include efforts to improve the reference genome sequence and assembly, including generating additional genome sequence data and ancillary sequence data for annotation.
Collaborator Contribution The other partners in the SGSC have contributed in multiple roles, including genome sequencing and analysis. The roles of each partner are recorded in the pig genome sequence paper as published in Nature in 2012 (Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398)
Impact The primary output from this collaborative partnership was the publication of the draft reference genome sequence of the pig (Sus scrofa) in Nature in November 2012. Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398 and associated companion papers. The genome sequence data are accessible in the public DNA sequence repositories and the annotated sequence can be accessed in the three main genome browsers (Ensembl, NCBI, UCSC). The SGSC has a continuing interest in improving the reference genome sequence. However, this task is mainly being pursued by the founding core partners.
 
Description International Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium 
Organisation Penn State University
Country United States of America 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Roslin Institute partner in the Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium contributed to the leadership of the pig genome sequencing project, coordination of analysis and annotation and writing the genome paper. On-going commitments to the SGSC include efforts to improve the reference genome sequence and assembly, including generating additional genome sequence data and ancillary sequence data for annotation.
Collaborator Contribution The other partners in the SGSC have contributed in multiple roles, including genome sequencing and analysis. The roles of each partner are recorded in the pig genome sequence paper as published in Nature in 2012 (Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398)
Impact The primary output from this collaborative partnership was the publication of the draft reference genome sequence of the pig (Sus scrofa) in Nature in November 2012. Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398 and associated companion papers. The genome sequence data are accessible in the public DNA sequence repositories and the annotated sequence can be accessed in the three main genome browsers (Ensembl, NCBI, UCSC). The SGSC has a continuing interest in improving the reference genome sequence. However, this task is mainly being pursued by the founding core partners.
 
Description International Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium 
Organisation Seoul National University
Country Korea, Republic of 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Roslin Institute partner in the Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium contributed to the leadership of the pig genome sequencing project, coordination of analysis and annotation and writing the genome paper. On-going commitments to the SGSC include efforts to improve the reference genome sequence and assembly, including generating additional genome sequence data and ancillary sequence data for annotation.
Collaborator Contribution The other partners in the SGSC have contributed in multiple roles, including genome sequencing and analysis. The roles of each partner are recorded in the pig genome sequence paper as published in Nature in 2012 (Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398)
Impact The primary output from this collaborative partnership was the publication of the draft reference genome sequence of the pig (Sus scrofa) in Nature in November 2012. Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398 and associated companion papers. The genome sequence data are accessible in the public DNA sequence repositories and the annotated sequence can be accessed in the three main genome browsers (Ensembl, NCBI, UCSC). The SGSC has a continuing interest in improving the reference genome sequence. However, this task is mainly being pursued by the founding core partners.
 
Description International Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium 
Organisation The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The Roslin Institute partner in the Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium contributed to the leadership of the pig genome sequencing project, coordination of analysis and annotation and writing the genome paper. On-going commitments to the SGSC include efforts to improve the reference genome sequence and assembly, including generating additional genome sequence data and ancillary sequence data for annotation.
Collaborator Contribution The other partners in the SGSC have contributed in multiple roles, including genome sequencing and analysis. The roles of each partner are recorded in the pig genome sequence paper as published in Nature in 2012 (Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398)
Impact The primary output from this collaborative partnership was the publication of the draft reference genome sequence of the pig (Sus scrofa) in Nature in November 2012. Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398 and associated companion papers. The genome sequence data are accessible in the public DNA sequence repositories and the annotated sequence can be accessed in the three main genome browsers (Ensembl, NCBI, UCSC). The SGSC has a continuing interest in improving the reference genome sequence. However, this task is mainly being pursued by the founding core partners.
 
Description International Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium 
Organisation U.S. Department of Agriculture USDA
Country United States of America 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution The Roslin Institute partner in the Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium contributed to the leadership of the pig genome sequencing project, coordination of analysis and annotation and writing the genome paper. On-going commitments to the SGSC include efforts to improve the reference genome sequence and assembly, including generating additional genome sequence data and ancillary sequence data for annotation.
Collaborator Contribution The other partners in the SGSC have contributed in multiple roles, including genome sequencing and analysis. The roles of each partner are recorded in the pig genome sequence paper as published in Nature in 2012 (Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398)
Impact The primary output from this collaborative partnership was the publication of the draft reference genome sequence of the pig (Sus scrofa) in Nature in November 2012. Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398 and associated companion papers. The genome sequence data are accessible in the public DNA sequence repositories and the annotated sequence can be accessed in the three main genome browsers (Ensembl, NCBI, UCSC). The SGSC has a continuing interest in improving the reference genome sequence. However, this task is mainly being pursued by the founding core partners.
 
Description International Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium 
Organisation USDA ARS BARC
Country United States of America 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Roslin Institute partner in the Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium contributed to the leadership of the pig genome sequencing project, coordination of analysis and annotation and writing the genome paper. On-going commitments to the SGSC include efforts to improve the reference genome sequence and assembly, including generating additional genome sequence data and ancillary sequence data for annotation.
Collaborator Contribution The other partners in the SGSC have contributed in multiple roles, including genome sequencing and analysis. The roles of each partner are recorded in the pig genome sequence paper as published in Nature in 2012 (Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398)
Impact The primary output from this collaborative partnership was the publication of the draft reference genome sequence of the pig (Sus scrofa) in Nature in November 2012. Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398 and associated companion papers. The genome sequence data are accessible in the public DNA sequence repositories and the annotated sequence can be accessed in the three main genome browsers (Ensembl, NCBI, UCSC). The SGSC has a continuing interest in improving the reference genome sequence. However, this task is mainly being pursued by the founding core partners.
 
Description International Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium 
Organisation USDA, ARS, US Meat Animal Research Center
Country United States of America 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution The Roslin Institute partner in the Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium contributed to the leadership of the pig genome sequencing project, coordination of analysis and annotation and writing the genome paper. On-going commitments to the SGSC include efforts to improve the reference genome sequence and assembly, including generating additional genome sequence data and ancillary sequence data for annotation.
Collaborator Contribution The other partners in the SGSC have contributed in multiple roles, including genome sequencing and analysis. The roles of each partner are recorded in the pig genome sequence paper as published in Nature in 2012 (Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398)
Impact The primary output from this collaborative partnership was the publication of the draft reference genome sequence of the pig (Sus scrofa) in Nature in November 2012. Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398 and associated companion papers. The genome sequence data are accessible in the public DNA sequence repositories and the annotated sequence can be accessed in the three main genome browsers (Ensembl, NCBI, UCSC). The SGSC has a continuing interest in improving the reference genome sequence. However, this task is mainly being pursued by the founding core partners.
 
Description International Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium 
Organisation University College London (UCL)
Department UCL Division of Infection & Immunity
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Roslin Institute partner in the Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium contributed to the leadership of the pig genome sequencing project, coordination of analysis and annotation and writing the genome paper. On-going commitments to the SGSC include efforts to improve the reference genome sequence and assembly, including generating additional genome sequence data and ancillary sequence data for annotation.
Collaborator Contribution The other partners in the SGSC have contributed in multiple roles, including genome sequencing and analysis. The roles of each partner are recorded in the pig genome sequence paper as published in Nature in 2012 (Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398)
Impact The primary output from this collaborative partnership was the publication of the draft reference genome sequence of the pig (Sus scrofa) in Nature in November 2012. Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398 and associated companion papers. The genome sequence data are accessible in the public DNA sequence repositories and the annotated sequence can be accessed in the three main genome browsers (Ensembl, NCBI, UCSC). The SGSC has a continuing interest in improving the reference genome sequence. However, this task is mainly being pursued by the founding core partners.
 
Description International Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium 
Organisation University of California
Department University of California, Berkeley
Country United States of America 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Roslin Institute partner in the Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium contributed to the leadership of the pig genome sequencing project, coordination of analysis and annotation and writing the genome paper. On-going commitments to the SGSC include efforts to improve the reference genome sequence and assembly, including generating additional genome sequence data and ancillary sequence data for annotation.
Collaborator Contribution The other partners in the SGSC have contributed in multiple roles, including genome sequencing and analysis. The roles of each partner are recorded in the pig genome sequence paper as published in Nature in 2012 (Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398)
Impact The primary output from this collaborative partnership was the publication of the draft reference genome sequence of the pig (Sus scrofa) in Nature in November 2012. Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398 and associated companion papers. The genome sequence data are accessible in the public DNA sequence repositories and the annotated sequence can be accessed in the three main genome browsers (Ensembl, NCBI, UCSC). The SGSC has a continuing interest in improving the reference genome sequence. However, this task is mainly being pursued by the founding core partners.
 
Description International Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium 
Organisation University of California, Davis
Department UC Davis Genome Cente
Country United States of America 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Roslin Institute partner in the Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium contributed to the leadership of the pig genome sequencing project, coordination of analysis and annotation and writing the genome paper. On-going commitments to the SGSC include efforts to improve the reference genome sequence and assembly, including generating additional genome sequence data and ancillary sequence data for annotation.
Collaborator Contribution The other partners in the SGSC have contributed in multiple roles, including genome sequencing and analysis. The roles of each partner are recorded in the pig genome sequence paper as published in Nature in 2012 (Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398)
Impact The primary output from this collaborative partnership was the publication of the draft reference genome sequence of the pig (Sus scrofa) in Nature in November 2012. Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398 and associated companion papers. The genome sequence data are accessible in the public DNA sequence repositories and the annotated sequence can be accessed in the three main genome browsers (Ensembl, NCBI, UCSC). The SGSC has a continuing interest in improving the reference genome sequence. However, this task is mainly being pursued by the founding core partners.
 
Description International Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium 
Organisation University of Copenhagen (Københavns Universitet UCPH)
Department Department of Basic Animal and Veterinary Sciences (IBHV)
Country Denmark, Kingdom of 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Roslin Institute partner in the Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium contributed to the leadership of the pig genome sequencing project, coordination of analysis and annotation and writing the genome paper. On-going commitments to the SGSC include efforts to improve the reference genome sequence and assembly, including generating additional genome sequence data and ancillary sequence data for annotation.
Collaborator Contribution The other partners in the SGSC have contributed in multiple roles, including genome sequencing and analysis. The roles of each partner are recorded in the pig genome sequence paper as published in Nature in 2012 (Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398)
Impact The primary output from this collaborative partnership was the publication of the draft reference genome sequence of the pig (Sus scrofa) in Nature in November 2012. Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398 and associated companion papers. The genome sequence data are accessible in the public DNA sequence repositories and the annotated sequence can be accessed in the three main genome browsers (Ensembl, NCBI, UCSC). The SGSC has a continuing interest in improving the reference genome sequence. However, this task is mainly being pursued by the founding core partners.
 
Description International Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium 
Organisation University of Illinois
Department University of Illinois (Urbana-Champaign)
Country United States of America 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Roslin Institute partner in the Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium contributed to the leadership of the pig genome sequencing project, coordination of analysis and annotation and writing the genome paper. On-going commitments to the SGSC include efforts to improve the reference genome sequence and assembly, including generating additional genome sequence data and ancillary sequence data for annotation.
Collaborator Contribution The other partners in the SGSC have contributed in multiple roles, including genome sequencing and analysis. The roles of each partner are recorded in the pig genome sequence paper as published in Nature in 2012 (Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398)
Impact The primary output from this collaborative partnership was the publication of the draft reference genome sequence of the pig (Sus scrofa) in Nature in November 2012. Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398 and associated companion papers. The genome sequence data are accessible in the public DNA sequence repositories and the annotated sequence can be accessed in the three main genome browsers (Ensembl, NCBI, UCSC). The SGSC has a continuing interest in improving the reference genome sequence. However, this task is mainly being pursued by the founding core partners.
 
Description International Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium 
Organisation University of Illinois
Department University of Illinois (Urbana-Champaign)
Country United States of America 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Roslin Institute partner in the Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium contributed to the leadership of the pig genome sequencing project, coordination of analysis and annotation and writing the genome paper. On-going commitments to the SGSC include efforts to improve the reference genome sequence and assembly, including generating additional genome sequence data and ancillary sequence data for annotation.
Collaborator Contribution The other partners in the SGSC have contributed in multiple roles, including genome sequencing and analysis. The roles of each partner are recorded in the pig genome sequence paper as published in Nature in 2012 (Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398)
Impact The primary output from this collaborative partnership was the publication of the draft reference genome sequence of the pig (Sus scrofa) in Nature in November 2012. Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398 and associated companion papers. The genome sequence data are accessible in the public DNA sequence repositories and the annotated sequence can be accessed in the three main genome browsers (Ensembl, NCBI, UCSC). The SGSC has a continuing interest in improving the reference genome sequence. However, this task is mainly being pursued by the founding core partners.
 
Description International Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium 
Organisation University of Illinois
Department University of Illinois (Urbana-Champaign)
Country United States of America 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Roslin Institute partner in the Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium contributed to the leadership of the pig genome sequencing project, coordination of analysis and annotation and writing the genome paper. On-going commitments to the SGSC include efforts to improve the reference genome sequence and assembly, including generating additional genome sequence data and ancillary sequence data for annotation.
Collaborator Contribution The other partners in the SGSC have contributed in multiple roles, including genome sequencing and analysis. The roles of each partner are recorded in the pig genome sequence paper as published in Nature in 2012 (Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398)
Impact The primary output from this collaborative partnership was the publication of the draft reference genome sequence of the pig (Sus scrofa) in Nature in November 2012. Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398 and associated companion papers. The genome sequence data are accessible in the public DNA sequence repositories and the annotated sequence can be accessed in the three main genome browsers (Ensembl, NCBI, UCSC). The SGSC has a continuing interest in improving the reference genome sequence. However, this task is mainly being pursued by the founding core partners.
 
Description International Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium 
Organisation University of Illinois
Department University of Illinois (Urbana-Champaign)
Country United States of America 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Roslin Institute partner in the Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium contributed to the leadership of the pig genome sequencing project, coordination of analysis and annotation and writing the genome paper. On-going commitments to the SGSC include efforts to improve the reference genome sequence and assembly, including generating additional genome sequence data and ancillary sequence data for annotation.
Collaborator Contribution The other partners in the SGSC have contributed in multiple roles, including genome sequencing and analysis. The roles of each partner are recorded in the pig genome sequence paper as published in Nature in 2012 (Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398)
Impact The primary output from this collaborative partnership was the publication of the draft reference genome sequence of the pig (Sus scrofa) in Nature in November 2012. Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398 and associated companion papers. The genome sequence data are accessible in the public DNA sequence repositories and the annotated sequence can be accessed in the three main genome browsers (Ensembl, NCBI, UCSC). The SGSC has a continuing interest in improving the reference genome sequence. However, this task is mainly being pursued by the founding core partners.
 
Description International Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium 
Organisation University of Illinois
Department University of Illinois (Urbana-Champaign)
Country United States of America 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Roslin Institute partner in the Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium contributed to the leadership of the pig genome sequencing project, coordination of analysis and annotation and writing the genome paper. On-going commitments to the SGSC include efforts to improve the reference genome sequence and assembly, including generating additional genome sequence data and ancillary sequence data for annotation.
Collaborator Contribution The other partners in the SGSC have contributed in multiple roles, including genome sequencing and analysis. The roles of each partner are recorded in the pig genome sequence paper as published in Nature in 2012 (Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398)
Impact The primary output from this collaborative partnership was the publication of the draft reference genome sequence of the pig (Sus scrofa) in Nature in November 2012. Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398 and associated companion papers. The genome sequence data are accessible in the public DNA sequence repositories and the annotated sequence can be accessed in the three main genome browsers (Ensembl, NCBI, UCSC). The SGSC has a continuing interest in improving the reference genome sequence. However, this task is mainly being pursued by the founding core partners.
 
Description International Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium 
Organisation University of Illinois
Country United States of America 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Roslin Institute partner in the Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium contributed to the leadership of the pig genome sequencing project, coordination of analysis and annotation and writing the genome paper. On-going commitments to the SGSC include efforts to improve the reference genome sequence and assembly, including generating additional genome sequence data and ancillary sequence data for annotation.
Collaborator Contribution The other partners in the SGSC have contributed in multiple roles, including genome sequencing and analysis. The roles of each partner are recorded in the pig genome sequence paper as published in Nature in 2012 (Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398)
Impact The primary output from this collaborative partnership was the publication of the draft reference genome sequence of the pig (Sus scrofa) in Nature in November 2012. Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398 and associated companion papers. The genome sequence data are accessible in the public DNA sequence repositories and the annotated sequence can be accessed in the three main genome browsers (Ensembl, NCBI, UCSC). The SGSC has a continuing interest in improving the reference genome sequence. However, this task is mainly being pursued by the founding core partners.
 
Description International Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium 
Organisation University of Kent
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Roslin Institute partner in the Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium contributed to the leadership of the pig genome sequencing project, coordination of analysis and annotation and writing the genome paper. On-going commitments to the SGSC include efforts to improve the reference genome sequence and assembly, including generating additional genome sequence data and ancillary sequence data for annotation.
Collaborator Contribution The other partners in the SGSC have contributed in multiple roles, including genome sequencing and analysis. The roles of each partner are recorded in the pig genome sequence paper as published in Nature in 2012 (Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398)
Impact The primary output from this collaborative partnership was the publication of the draft reference genome sequence of the pig (Sus scrofa) in Nature in November 2012. Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398 and associated companion papers. The genome sequence data are accessible in the public DNA sequence repositories and the annotated sequence can be accessed in the three main genome browsers (Ensembl, NCBI, UCSC). The SGSC has a continuing interest in improving the reference genome sequence. However, this task is mainly being pursued by the founding core partners.
 
Description International Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium 
Organisation University of Leipzig
Country Germany, Federal Republic of 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Roslin Institute partner in the Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium contributed to the leadership of the pig genome sequencing project, coordination of analysis and annotation and writing the genome paper. On-going commitments to the SGSC include efforts to improve the reference genome sequence and assembly, including generating additional genome sequence data and ancillary sequence data for annotation.
Collaborator Contribution The other partners in the SGSC have contributed in multiple roles, including genome sequencing and analysis. The roles of each partner are recorded in the pig genome sequence paper as published in Nature in 2012 (Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398)
Impact The primary output from this collaborative partnership was the publication of the draft reference genome sequence of the pig (Sus scrofa) in Nature in November 2012. Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398 and associated companion papers. The genome sequence data are accessible in the public DNA sequence repositories and the annotated sequence can be accessed in the three main genome browsers (Ensembl, NCBI, UCSC). The SGSC has a continuing interest in improving the reference genome sequence. However, this task is mainly being pursued by the founding core partners.
 
Description International Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium 
Organisation University of Minnesota
Country United States of America 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Roslin Institute partner in the Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium contributed to the leadership of the pig genome sequencing project, coordination of analysis and annotation and writing the genome paper. On-going commitments to the SGSC include efforts to improve the reference genome sequence and assembly, including generating additional genome sequence data and ancillary sequence data for annotation.
Collaborator Contribution The other partners in the SGSC have contributed in multiple roles, including genome sequencing and analysis. The roles of each partner are recorded in the pig genome sequence paper as published in Nature in 2012 (Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398)
Impact The primary output from this collaborative partnership was the publication of the draft reference genome sequence of the pig (Sus scrofa) in Nature in November 2012. Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398 and associated companion papers. The genome sequence data are accessible in the public DNA sequence repositories and the annotated sequence can be accessed in the three main genome browsers (Ensembl, NCBI, UCSC). The SGSC has a continuing interest in improving the reference genome sequence. However, this task is mainly being pursued by the founding core partners.
 
Description International Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium 
Organisation University of Uppsala
Country Sweden, Kingdom of 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Roslin Institute partner in the Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium contributed to the leadership of the pig genome sequencing project, coordination of analysis and annotation and writing the genome paper. On-going commitments to the SGSC include efforts to improve the reference genome sequence and assembly, including generating additional genome sequence data and ancillary sequence data for annotation.
Collaborator Contribution The other partners in the SGSC have contributed in multiple roles, including genome sequencing and analysis. The roles of each partner are recorded in the pig genome sequence paper as published in Nature in 2012 (Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398)
Impact The primary output from this collaborative partnership was the publication of the draft reference genome sequence of the pig (Sus scrofa) in Nature in November 2012. Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398 and associated companion papers. The genome sequence data are accessible in the public DNA sequence repositories and the annotated sequence can be accessed in the three main genome browsers (Ensembl, NCBI, UCSC). The SGSC has a continuing interest in improving the reference genome sequence. However, this task is mainly being pursued by the founding core partners.
 
Description International Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium 
Organisation University of Uppsala
Country Sweden, Kingdom of 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Roslin Institute partner in the Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium contributed to the leadership of the pig genome sequencing project, coordination of analysis and annotation and writing the genome paper. On-going commitments to the SGSC include efforts to improve the reference genome sequence and assembly, including generating additional genome sequence data and ancillary sequence data for annotation.
Collaborator Contribution The other partners in the SGSC have contributed in multiple roles, including genome sequencing and analysis. The roles of each partner are recorded in the pig genome sequence paper as published in Nature in 2012 (Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398)
Impact The primary output from this collaborative partnership was the publication of the draft reference genome sequence of the pig (Sus scrofa) in Nature in November 2012. Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398 and associated companion papers. The genome sequence data are accessible in the public DNA sequence repositories and the annotated sequence can be accessed in the three main genome browsers (Ensembl, NCBI, UCSC). The SGSC has a continuing interest in improving the reference genome sequence. However, this task is mainly being pursued by the founding core partners.
 
Description International Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium 
Organisation University of Wageningen
Country Netherlands, Kingdom of the 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Roslin Institute partner in the Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium contributed to the leadership of the pig genome sequencing project, coordination of analysis and annotation and writing the genome paper. On-going commitments to the SGSC include efforts to improve the reference genome sequence and assembly, including generating additional genome sequence data and ancillary sequence data for annotation.
Collaborator Contribution The other partners in the SGSC have contributed in multiple roles, including genome sequencing and analysis. The roles of each partner are recorded in the pig genome sequence paper as published in Nature in 2012 (Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398)
Impact The primary output from this collaborative partnership was the publication of the draft reference genome sequence of the pig (Sus scrofa) in Nature in November 2012. Groenen et al. 2012. Nature 491: 393-398 and associated companion papers. The genome sequence data are accessible in the public DNA sequence repositories and the annotated sequence can be accessed in the three main genome browsers (Ensembl, NCBI, UCSC). The SGSC has a continuing interest in improving the reference genome sequence. However, this task is mainly being pursued by the founding core partners.
 
Description Pig HD SNP chip 
Organisation Affymetrix
Country United States of America 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution The Roslin partner initiated this collaboration, contributed to the selection of SNPs for the chip design, provided DNA samples and performed the genotyping.
Collaborator Contribution The Wageningen partner mined sequence data from multiple domestic pigs and wild boar in order to identify putative Single Nucelotide Polymorphisms (SNPs); performed sequence analyses and provided Affymetrix with prioritised SNPs and associated sequence information. Affymetrix designed and manufactured the SNP chips.
Impact The Affymetrix PigHD_v1 SNP chip has been used for genotyping pigs in genetic studies led by the Roslin partner. The Affymetrix PigHD_v1 SNP chip will be released as a catalogue product by Affymetrix Inc. This high density SNP genotyping chip facilitates the simultaneous genotyping of ten times more SNP loci than previous SNP chips on 96 DNA samples in parallel and has potential for high resolution genetics studies in pigs.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Pig HD SNP chip 
Organisation University of Edinburgh
Department The Roslin Institute
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Roslin partner initiated this collaboration, contributed to the selection of SNPs for the chip design, provided DNA samples and performed the genotyping.
Collaborator Contribution The Wageningen partner mined sequence data from multiple domestic pigs and wild boar in order to identify putative Single Nucelotide Polymorphisms (SNPs); performed sequence analyses and provided Affymetrix with prioritised SNPs and associated sequence information. Affymetrix designed and manufactured the SNP chips.
Impact The Affymetrix PigHD_v1 SNP chip has been used for genotyping pigs in genetic studies led by the Roslin partner. The Affymetrix PigHD_v1 SNP chip will be released as a catalogue product by Affymetrix Inc. This high density SNP genotyping chip facilitates the simultaneous genotyping of ten times more SNP loci than previous SNP chips on 96 DNA samples in parallel and has potential for high resolution genetics studies in pigs.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Pig HD SNP chip 
Organisation University of Wageningen
Country Netherlands, Kingdom of the 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Roslin partner initiated this collaboration, contributed to the selection of SNPs for the chip design, provided DNA samples and performed the genotyping.
Collaborator Contribution The Wageningen partner mined sequence data from multiple domestic pigs and wild boar in order to identify putative Single Nucelotide Polymorphisms (SNPs); performed sequence analyses and provided Affymetrix with prioritised SNPs and associated sequence information. Affymetrix designed and manufactured the SNP chips.
Impact The Affymetrix PigHD_v1 SNP chip has been used for genotyping pigs in genetic studies led by the Roslin partner. The Affymetrix PigHD_v1 SNP chip will be released as a catalogue product by Affymetrix Inc. This high density SNP genotyping chip facilitates the simultaneous genotyping of ten times more SNP loci than previous SNP chips on 96 DNA samples in parallel and has potential for high resolution genetics studies in pigs.
Start Year 2014
 
Description SRUC - Rainer Roehe 
Organisation SRUC
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We have collaborated with Rainer Roehe at SRUC since 2011, and we provide expertise in genomics, DNA sequencing, metagenomics and bioinformatics. We use this to investigate the role of the microbiome in methane emissions and feed conversion ratio.
Collaborator Contribution The SRUC partners provide expertise in rumen biology and function, alongside samples collected and measured for methane emissions and feed conversion ratio
Impact • Rumen metagenomics: we have sequenced the rumen metagenome of 8 cattle selected for high- and low- methane emissions, matched for breed and diet; and we have demonstrated that high methane emitters are enriched for (i) methanogenic Archaea and (ii) enzymes involved in the methane production pathway. Of the latter, we show that there exists over 5000 novel versions of known enzymes involved in methane production. We have made available a database of over 1.9 million proteins, the majority of them novel, as part of this study (10.1186/s12864-015-2032-0) • Host control of the microbiome: using the same dataset, we demonstrate that largely speaking the rumen microbiome structure and function if under genetic control; and can be significantly associated with both methane emissions and feed-conversion-ratio (FCR) (journal.pgen.1005846)
Start Year 2011
 
Title ArkDB 
Description ArkDB is a generic, species-independent database and associated web interface built to capture the (then) state of published information on genome mapping in a given species. It stores details of references, markers and loci and genetic linkage and cytogenetic maps which can be drawn using the online map-drawing application. Data from linkage maps held within the ArkDB system can be drawn alongside their corresponding genome sequence maps 
Type Of Technology Webtool/Application 
Year Produced 2008 
Impact Comparative genomics got a whole lot easier. Comparing the genetic architecture of multiple species is now possible in an interactive graphical environment 
URL http://www.thearkdb.org/
 
Title ArkMAP 
Description Draws genetic linkage, radiation hybrid or other genomic/genetic linkage mapping representations 
Type Of Technology Webtool/Application 
Year Produced 2010 
Impact Several studies/papers facilitated, particularly in the area of fish comparative genomics 
URL http://www.bioinformatics.roslin.ed.ac.uk/arkmap/
 
Title JEnsembl Java API to Ensembl data systems 
Description This is an implementation of a modular Java-based API to the Ensemble data systems. The demonstration architecture addresses a number of objectives: specifically, it provides access to all versions of databases at Ensembl and EnsemblGenomes. It implements a varied selection of data access functions to demonstrate data retrieval from 'Core', 'Variation' and 'Compara' databases; mapping between CoordinateSystems and mapping transparently between database versions where there has been a change in schema requiring alternate data access methods. 
Type Of Technology Software 
Year Produced 2012 
Open Source License? Yes  
Impact The modular architecture allows us to update access as the Ensemble schema evolves whilst maintaining backwards compatibility with previous releases. This allows across-release comparisons to be conducted within a single code base, something that is not possible with other available APIs. 
URL http://jensembl.sourceforge.net
 
Title VIPER 
Description VIPER combines an improved ResSpecies algorithm for genotype inheritance checking and inference with a novel space-efficient visualisation of pedigree structure in a desktop tool for exploring then cleaning data errors in pedigree/genotype datasets. Datapoint errors in pedigree genotype datasets are difficult to identify and adversely affect downstream genetic analyses. Errors that are inconsistent with the rules of Mendelian inheritance typically invalidate linkage analysis algorithms, and cause such analyses to fail. Genotype errors may arise from a variety of systematic or sporadic errors in either the genotyping assay, or in recording the pedigree or genotype information. By applying an inheritance-checking algorithm for markers across the pedigree and visualising the inheritance data in an exploratory user interface, VIPER allows the sources of data inconsistency can be resolved. VIPER displays the structure of the study population in a novel pedigree visualisation of generation sandwiches. Error rates reported by the inheritance algorithm are overlaid on the pedigree structure, allowing the inheritance pattern of reported errors to be explored, and the likely underlying bad datapoint resolved. 
Type Of Technology Webtool/Application 
Year Produced 2012 
Impact Permits more rapid and efficient cleaning and repair of genotype data from pedigree populations. Greatly speeds the analysis and improves the power of genetic linkage studies. 
URL http://bioinformatics.roslin.ed.ac.uk/viper/
 
Title resSpecies 
Description Database and associated web interface to handle pedigree populations, genotypes and phenotypes for genetic linkage mapping and quantitative trait linkage mapping studies. System checks inheritance of markers and formats/reformats data in readiness for import into common analysis programs. 
Type Of Technology Webtool/Application 
Year Produced 2008 
Impact Non computer-literate scientists can manipulate data - error free - within minutes rather than days 
URL http://www.resspecies.org/
 
Description So many avian genomes - problems of annotation and data access 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presented a talk at Genome10K Conference: So many avian genomes - problems of annotation and data access, 1-5 March, 2015, California, USA
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Avian Genomics: current status and future opportunities. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presented a talk: Avian Genomics: current status and future opportunities. International Ornithological Congress (ioc26) 18-24th August 2014, Tokyo, Japan
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Avian genome evolution and the origins of species diversity. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Invited lecture: Avian genome evolution and the origins of species diversity. In "Molecular evolution of avian species", SMBE2016, Queensland's Gold Coast, Australia, 3-7 July, 2016.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Avian genomics: current status and future opportunities 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Talk at 16th ADNAT Convention on Animal Genetics and Genomics. Talk: Avian genomics: current status and future opportunities. Hyderabad, Dec 17-19, 2012.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012
 
Description Chicken Genome: Current Status and Future Trends from Next Generation Sequencing 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presented a talk at the 3rd Annual NGS Asia Congress. Talk: Chicken Genome: Current Status and Future Trends from Next Generation Sequencing. 8 - 9 Oct 2013, Singapore.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Chicken genome update, consortia for RNAseq, SNPs and more ... 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Talk at Avian Model Systems 7. Talk: Chicken genome update, consortia for RNAseq, SNPs and more " 14-19 Nov, Nagoya, Japan 2012.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012
 
Description Chromosome evolution and comparative genomics 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presented a research talk "Chromosome evolution and comparative genomics" to the 18th International Chromosome Conference, Manchester, UK (2011). Aim was to inform and open up collaborations.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2011
 
Description Development of New Tools for Genetic Selection for a Sustainable Poultry Industry 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presented a talk: Development of New Tools for Genetic Selection for a Sustainable Poultry Industry (2014), Veterinary Advances in Animal Health and Welfare Research - Impact and Opportunities, Feb 20-24, 2014, NIANP Auditorium, Adugodi, Bangalore, India
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Edinburgh India Institute, Inaugural conference on 15-16 May 2014 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Gave a short talk about avian influenza BBSRC-DBT project and how it came about, joint talk with our India collaborators. Edinburgh India Institute, Inaugural conference on 15-16 May 2014. John McIntyre Conference Centre, Edinburgh. Conference theme: Innovative Engagement for Sustainable Development: the Edinburgh-India Story.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Gene annotation of the chicken genome. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Invited lecture: Gene annotation of the chicken genome. Next Generation Sequencing Conference (NGS) 2016, Barcelona, Spain, 4-6 April, 2016.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description ISAG Conference 2012. Talk: NGS of multiple chicken lines and development of a high-density 600K SNP genotyping array, 16-20 July, Cairns, Australia 2012. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presented a talk at ISAG Conference 2012. Talk: NGS of multiple chicken lines and development of a high-density 600K SNP genotyping array, 16-20 July, Cairns, Australia 2012.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012
 
Description Interactive presentations at the Royal Highland Show 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact I supported the Roslin Institute's interactive presentation at the Royal Highland Show. Topics we covered were widely varied, including genetics and genomics, infection and immunity, farm animal health, and companion animal welfare.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014,2015
URL http://royalhighlandshow.org
 
Description NODAI International Symposium "Genome Research: Current Challenges and Future Directions" 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact presented a talk at •the NODAI International Symposium "Genome Research: Current Challenges and Future Directions", Kokuyo Hall in Shinagawa, Tokyo, Japan, on 21st January, 2012
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012
 
Description New tools and prospects for chicken genomics 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Talk at Genetics Society of Australia (GSA), July 2015, University of Adelaide, Australia
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Next Generation Sequencing of multiple chicken lines reveals a rich source of Single nucleotide polymorphisms for high resolution genetic studies 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Talk at The 1st International Conference on Genomics in the Americas. Talk: Next Generation Sequencing of multiple chicken lines reveals a rich source of Single nucleotide polymorphisms for high resolution genetic studies, 27-28 Sept, Philadelphia, USA.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012
 
Description Organised a British Council Researcher Links conference in Mexico 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Co-organised a Researcher Links conference about Genomics in Aquaculture in Merida, Mexico in January 2017. This 5 day event featured around 40 scientists, with a mix of young researchers and mentors from both the UK and Mexico. This has already led to several collaborative links between UK and Mexico in this field.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://sites.google.com/site/genomicsinaquaculturemxuk/home
 
Description Past, Present and Future of Genomics in Poultry Breeding. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Talk: Past, Present and Future of Genomics in Poultry Breeding. 25th World's Poultry Congress, Beijing, 5-9 September, 2016.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Poultry Genomics: Current Status and Future Trends from Next Generation Sequencing 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presented a talk at the 8th International Conference on Genomics (ICG-8). Talk: Poultry Genomics: Current Status and Future Trends from Next Generation Sequencing. 29 Oct - 1 Nov 2013, Shenzhen, China.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Poultry Genomics: Current Status and Future Trends from Next Generation Sequencing 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Talk at Animal Genomics Research Group "The global genomic approaches to climate change impact on livestock production". Talk: Poultry Genomics: Current Status and Future Trends from Next Generation Sequencing. 10-15 July, Seoul, Korea, 2013.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Production Animal Health and Welfare Research: Impacts and Opportunities. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Talk at Production Animal Health and Welfare Research: Impacts and Opportunities. 19-20 Feb, 2015, Indian Council for Agricultural Research (ICAR), New Delhi, India
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Structural aspects of genomes across species 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presented a talk at The 8th European Poultry Genetics Symposium. Talk: Structural aspects of genomes across species. 25-27 Sept, Venice Italy, 2013.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Teaching Animal Body 1 Lectures (R(D)SVS) on Cell and Molecular Biology 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Undergraduate students
Results and Impact Starting in 2016 I give lecturers and administer exams to first year veterinary medicine students. Classes size is approximately 110 students. The topics I cover include cell and molecular biology and I incorporate medically relevant examples of genetic conditions that affect livestock and companion animals.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description The 6th International chick meeting, Edinburgh (2011) Avian Genome Evolution 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Organised conference and presented a talk "Avian Genome Evolution" at the 6th International chick meeting, Edinburgh (2011). Aim was to inform, build network, seek collaborations, etc. in the avian research community. Further consortia (e.g. the chicken RNAseq consortium) and projects were created.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2011
 
Description The Chicken and other Avian Genomes: new insights and opportunities for all from high throughput sequencing and bioinformatics. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Talk: the Chicken and other Avian Genomes: new insights and opportunities for all from high throughput sequencing and bioinformatics. In "Avian Model Systems 9: a new integrative platform", Taipei, Taiwan, 38 March to 3 April, 2016.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description The chicken genome 10 years on. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Keynote lecture: chicken genome - 10 years on. Avian Model Systems - the 8th International Meeting, Cold Spring Harbour, USA, 4-8th March, 2014.

CSHL Leading Strand - Keynote Lecture Series (http://theleadingstrand.cshl.edu/Course/Keynote/2014/AVIAN/150

The chicken genome 10 years on - BBSRC (http://www.bbsrc.ac.uk/news/events/1403-chicken-genome.aspx)
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014