Molecular Machines that use structured DNA for directed movement

Lead Research Organisation: University of Portsmouth
Department Name: Sch of Biological Sciences

Abstract

We propose to develop a dynamic nanotool for use in drug discovery. This nanotool is based around a nanoactuator that uses a biological molecular motor to manipulate DNA and attached objects, in this case a magnetic bead. An electronic sensing system, based on MagnetoResistive (MR) devices will detect motion of the magnetic bead and output an electronic signal. Both the DNA and the motors can be targets for drugs, which means that the device can be used in screening drug-target interactions. The major advantage this system offers is single molecule detection and reporting of events, which will improve sensitivity to limits that are possible. The concept will be expanded by making novel use of branched and hairpin structures to provide information about position of binding of DNA-binding proteins, which will allow us to identify drugs targeted at non-motor DNA-binding proteins such as transcription factors.

Publications


10 25 50
Freitas PP (2012) Spintronic platforms for biomedical applications. in Lab on a chip
Youell J (2012) Mechanistic insight into Type I restriction endonucleases. in Frontiers in bioscience (Landmark edition)
 
Description University of Portsmouth
Amount £296,955 (GBP)
Funding ID IBBS PhD bursary and fees for 3 yrs to Luke Evans. 
Organisation University of Portsmouth 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK)
Start 10/2009 
End 10/2012
 
Description Molecular Machines that use structured DNA 
Organisation Dresden University of Technology
Country Germany, Federal Republic of 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution DG is a biochemists and molecular biologist with a strong interest in developing biotechnology applications using expertise in DNA binding proteins.
Collaborator Contribution Our grant, 'Molecular Machines', involved an already-established and productive collaboration between four research teams based in the UK, France, Germany and Portugal, and built on developments from previous successful EU funding schemes (Mol-Switch and BioNano-Switch). The overall aim was to further develop a nanoactuator device for magnetoresistive (MR) sensing of molecular motor function and pursue how optical and magnetic tweezer set-ups, at the interface of biotechnology and electronic engineering, could be explored for new functions and uses in bionanotechnology.
Impact As listed in publications
Start Year 2009
 
Description Molecular Machines that use structured DNA 
Organisation Institute of Systems and Computer Engineering, Research and Development in Lisbon (INESC-ID)
Country Portugal, Portuguese Republic 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution DG is a biochemists and molecular biologist with a strong interest in developing biotechnology applications using expertise in DNA binding proteins.
Collaborator Contribution Our grant, 'Molecular Machines', involved an already-established and productive collaboration between four research teams based in the UK, France, Germany and Portugal, and built on developments from previous successful EU funding schemes (Mol-Switch and BioNano-Switch). The overall aim was to further develop a nanoactuator device for magnetoresistive (MR) sensing of molecular motor function and pursue how optical and magnetic tweezer set-ups, at the interface of biotechnology and electronic engineering, could be explored for new functions and uses in bionanotechnology.
Impact As listed in publications
Start Year 2009
 
Description Molecular Machines that use structured DNA 
Organisation École Normale Supérieure, Paris
Country France, French Republic 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution DG is a biochemists and molecular biologist with a strong interest in developing biotechnology applications using expertise in DNA binding proteins.
Collaborator Contribution Our grant, 'Molecular Machines', involved an already-established and productive collaboration between four research teams based in the UK, France, Germany and Portugal, and built on developments from previous successful EU funding schemes (Mol-Switch and BioNano-Switch). The overall aim was to further develop a nanoactuator device for magnetoresistive (MR) sensing of molecular motor function and pursue how optical and magnetic tweezer set-ups, at the interface of biotechnology and electronic engineering, could be explored for new functions and uses in bionanotechnology.
Impact As listed in publications
Start Year 2009