Moving Stories: Understanding the Role of Physical Activity on Experiences and Perceptions of (Self-)Ageing

Lead Research Organisation: University of Exeter
Department Name: University of Exeter Medical School

Abstract

This research aims to examine older adults experiences of sport and physical activity, and to understand how physically active older adults are perceived by others.

The project is divided into two stages. Stage one involves gathering experiences of ageing and physical activity from 40 adults (60 years+) recruited from a range of indoor and outdoor physical activity groups. Data will be collected using in-depth interviews and photography, and will be represented in the form of a DVD.

The second stage will involve a total of 24 focus groups with young, midlife and older adults (12 groups on two separate occasions). The first focus group meeting will explore the participants perceptions of (self-)ageing. The second will involve viewing the DVD as a means to elicit discussion regarding physical activity in older age, and expectations of ageing bodies. Multiple forms of analysis will be used with the data to generate in-depth understanding about the impact of physical activity on experiences and perceptions of (self-)ageing. This will enable the value of sport and physical activity to be captured in a more complete and nuanced way. In addition, the information gleaned will assist in promoting healthy ageing and improving perceptions of the ageing process.

 
Title Move - The Exhibition 
Description Images were produced of older adults doing their activity as part of the Moving Stories project. This exhibition, compiled of approx. 25 images was displayed in a number of public and academic arenas including: The Eden Project Café, St Austell; Truro City Library; Royal Cornwall Hospital; Truro College and at various conferences including the Ageing Bodies and Society Conference at the British Library. 
Type Of Art Image 
Year Produced 2012 
Impact Requests by third parties to use the images in their own reports / documentation (e.g. evaluation report of AgeUK's Fit as a Fiddle). Members of the public were invited to leave feedback in a comments box. Here, people highlighted the value of seeing 'different' and 'refreshing' images of older adults and also commented on the positive impact of using public spaces to display images. 
 
Title Moving Stories Moving On 
Description Working in collaboration with theatre company Theatrescience, Moving Stories - Moving On was a verbatim theatre piece based on the Moving Stories project. The purpose of Moving Stories was to investigate people's experiences of being physically active in older age and also how physically active older adults are perceived by others. Like much of the population, many older adults live inactive lifestyles and this can have negative consequences for their health and wellbeing. By listening to the stories of physically active older adults about 'moving', the research team were able to gain some understanding of how and why - at different points in their lives - they are able to deal with the barriers and challenges to being active that all of us can face. The performance was followed by a discussion with the audience. The production of MSMO was supported by the RCUK Catalyst Fund for public engagement. 
Type Of Art Performance (Music, Dance, Drama, etc) 
Year Produced 2014 
Impact Initial discussions are taking place with AgeUK regarding how MSMO might inform the training of staff who are involved in their Living Well programme. Key findings leaflets were distributed during the show. A request for a further 60 copies was made by AgeUK to distribute at a forthcoming meeting. Written audience feedback from this event included comments such as: It makes me think. Loneliness effects people that participate in these activities. I didn't know / realise that this was so much of an issue with this group. Teaching style was unique and enjoyable. It really showed how useful qualitative surveys are. I run a seated ballet class for clients with Parkinsons and now appreciate how important the social aspect is for them as well as the exercise. 
URL http://www.ecehh.org/news/ageing-research-on-stage/
 
Title Moving Stories: A Short Film 
Description A short film which captures many of the key themes that arose from our analysis of 50 life history interviews with physically active older adults. The film is being used in the next stage of the research to elicit discussion in a series of focus groups with people of different ages. It has been well received by a number of stakeholders that we are interacting with (e.g. Cornwall Sports Partnerships, Health and Wellbeing Board of Cornwall and Isles of Scilly PCT). 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2011 
Impact The impacts realised from this film have been around challenging stereotypes of ageing, encouraging (critical) reflection on one's own ageing process, being inspired to become involved in physical activity, or simply, to keep doing what one is doing. Examples of impact testimonies: I watched your film... it was excellent. Let's get together at the World Congress for Active Ageing, it would be good to met you. (Prof. Wojtek Chodzko-Zajko, University of Illinois, College of Applied Health Sciences). I showed your film in one of my undergraduate classes and the room was quiet when it finished. It really touched them. You could tell that it was so powerful and the discussions that followed afterwards about the way we promote physical activity in older age further reinforced that. (Dr Joe Piggin, Loughborough University). The photography and film exhibits were excellent. The film especially put across the inner enjoyment and wellbeing people get from physical exercise. it's all about fun as well as all the by-products" (Research Participant) 
URL http://vimeo.com/44922853
 
Description Details of our Key Findings have been published as a booklet and circulated widely to specialist and non-specialist audiences. A copy can be accessed using this link:

http://www.ecehh.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/Moving-Stories-Booklet.pdf

Our research identified five key issues that were significant for the older physically active adults involved in our study in relation to their inclination and ability to engage in a physically active lifestyle. These were:

The pleasures of physical activity - The research showed that while older adults are generally aware of health benefits associated with regular physical activity, these functional outcomes are not always what sustain this behaviour. Instead, it is the various pleasures gained from participation. The research showed for the first time, how pleasure can be experienced in different ways, places and at different times by older adults, thereby advancing our theoretical understanding of pleasure, and how this relates to the lives of (physically active) older adults.

The relevance of relationships - Our research demonstrated how physical activity in older age is embedded within various relationships. Some older adults exercise with their partner. Others take time away from their partner to exercise alone or with friends. For women in particular, time away from significant others to fulfil their exercise needs could often cause feelings of guilt, especially when that relationship was based around care giving. The loss of an exercise partner can impact negatively on people's desire and ability to continue.

A life course approach to physical activity engagement - The research illustrated the importance of considering how physical activity in older age fits within the context of a persons 'whole life' and indeed, their life history. This has implications for how we might study, or research this topic in the future and also for how physical activity is promoted in 'real world' settings. Crucially, this research showed how people find themselves on and off an exercise 'bandwagon' throughout their life due to a range of circumstances. The knowledge that it is normal to 'fall off' and possible to climb back on - even if it for the first time - 'worked well' for our participants in terms of initiating and sustaining an overall physically active lifestyle. This was especially pertinent for women, whose activity levels were heavily impacted by child raising and negative experiences of school PE where the identity of 'not being the sporty type' were often heavily ingrained and enduring.

The mindset - Perhaps contrary to popular belief that 'some people just find it easy because they like it', physically active older adults do not always find it easy to sustain their exercise habit. This research demonstrated how a positive mindset was used to overcome periods where the inclination to do less felt especially persuasive! Here, knowledge of the health benefits associated with regular participation in physical activity coupled with previous experiences of doing exercise, which left them "feeling better" we important in directing them to healthy behaviours. Crucially however, this latter type of knowledge had to be 'felt' first hand rather than conveyed through the words of a health professional.

This research generated important knowledge into broader perceptions of ageing. Many of the participants were aware that as they were growing older, there were expectations about how they should behave. They reported feelings of being "put in a box" once people learned of their age and that because they were considered "old" it was assumed they would not be interested in certain things (e.g. learning new hobbies, the bodily pleasures associated with physical activity). This lends support to the importance of physical activity promoters increasing the visibility of a diverse group of older adults being active in order to challenge limited stereotypes concerning what it means to grow older. This outcome of the research was advanced in a practical manner through the numerous public photography exhibitions which show cased images of our research participants doing their activity.

The issues highlighted above help us to understand 'what works' well' for this group of people. Such knowledge is useful when trying to understand how and why some older adults find themselves willing and able to live a physically active older age when others may not. Moreover, it has relevance to the level of success that can be expected of policy initiatives promoting physical activity in older age, alongside positive images of ageing and meaningful intergenerational relationships.

Alongside the advances made in how we understand the role of physical activity in shaping perceptions of (self)-ageing, the research also developed new knowledge regarding the use of qualitative methods. Specifically, our critical reflection on the use of photography interviews has made a unique contribution to the literature on visual methods. In addition, the use of focus groups within this project as a means of identifying how stories of physical activity might shift between different generational groups and the role of film in supporting this process has much to offer knowledge around focus group research, which is currently largely devoid of a theoretical basis.
Exploitation Route Currently in early discussions with AgeUK regarding how these findings can inform their work.

Based on the knowledge we have generated through this project, we have advised Cornwall Sport Partnerships on how best to serve the needs and desires of older adults.

Educational - Wide circulation of this research (including visual images) to people of all age groups as a means of challenging negative perceptions of older age and assumptions about physical activity in older age.

Health - feedback from Prof George Morris (Independent Environment and Health Policy Officer) via email: "I've been working quite a bit recently with the World Health Organisation, Europe on environmental health inequalities. Some of this relates to identifying good and promising practice for engaging disadvantaged groups in physical activity. Age is one of the dimensions of disadvantage which WHO are interested in... This all has relevance to Moving Stories and implies the policy relevance at European level".

Since the Primary Investigators move to the University of Bath (January, 2016), I am currently in the process of establishing new networks within organisations and partner groups who have an interest in this topic and the capacity to initiate change.
Sectors Education,Healthcare,Leisure Activities, including Sports, Recreation and Tourism
URL https://vimeo.com/42829169
 
Description Moving Stories has led to a wide array of impacts with different audiences and non-academic collaborators. This has arisen, primarily at a 'grass roots' level (in keeping with the design and objectives of the project) through a number of different routes. The impact achieved to date via this project cohere around three broad areas: 1. Strategic Development. The involvement of non-academic partners in our project both in the form of advisory board members (e.g. Mike Thomas, Director of Cornwall Sport Partnerships, and Jan Howell, 'Fit as Fiddle' co-ordinator, AgeUK), and as attendees at our public engagement events (e.g. Felicity Owen, Director of Public Health at Cornwall County Council & Cornwall & Isles of Scilly PCT; Carolyn Rule, Cabinet member for health & wellbeing, Cornwall Council) enabled our research to feed into strategic discussions regarding the health and wellbeing of older adults, including provision of physical activity. This is evidenced by the following correspondence from key stakeholders: 'We are working with a group about signposting older people to appropriate levels of exercise and I think the perceptions work would be of great interest. I would be very happy to give it an airing at the next meeting if you think appropriate and I'm sure the team here at Cornwall Sports Partnership would find it of interest'; (email, 28/5/12, Mike Thomas, Director of Cornwall Sport Partnerships). 'I do feel it would be very useful to use the work in what we are doing under the Health and Wellbeing banner for Cornwall, trying to get everyone to be more active. I'm sure the film will be quite inspirational so would be grateful if we could make use of it ahead of launching our work plan'; (email, 7/9/12. Carolyn Rule, Cabinet member for Health and Wellbeing, Cornwall Council). 'Bruce Lockie (Physical Activity Lead Officer) and I are working on behalf of the Physical Activity Working Group, which is accountable to the Health and Wellbeing Board, to produce a Physical Activity Strategy for Cornwall. The strategy will be drafted towards the end of January, finalised and presented to the Health and Wellbeing Board later this year (probably in May/June). I am carrying out an assessment of existing activity and identifying potential future action/scenarios. I would like to meet with you to discuss your work and role and to find out what you think should happen to increase levels of physical activity in Cornwall.' (email, 10/1/13, Jonathan Woods, Consultant for Cornwall Sports Partnership). Our findings also informed the design of a community based initiative aimed at increasing levels of physical activity among older people in Cornwall, for which Cornwall Sports Partnership submitted an application to Sport England's 'Get Healthy, Get Active' fund. 2. Inspiring Individuals The research achieved societal impact in the form of inspiring individuals with regards to physical activity in older age (planning to be, being, continuing to be). Collecting data on physical activity levels before and after people were 'exposed' to the research was beyond the scope of the objectives set out for this particular project. That said, personal testimonies supporting the impact that the research has had on people's beliefs and in some instances behaviours were offered in various environments throughout the course of the research. These testimonies give credence to the value of stories in providing people with resources with which to make sense of their own ageing process and the lives of older people around them. For example: I found the video of others involvement very inspiring ... and I have been persuaded to start a T'ai Chi group for the U3A group, which I have been doing for the last month and it is going very well. (email, participant [T'ai Chi], 14/7/12). 'I thought you might like to know that our focus group discussions with you were having a lasting effect. When you interviewed our Book Club last year you raised our awareness of the importance of exercise. All of us now often discuss diet and exercise with each other. Although we probably see each other at least once a week as part of the village community, our Book Club meets once a month. One of our members whom you did not meet has moved out of the village to [name of town] and when it is her turn to host the Book Club meeting, [names] and I now drive over to [name of town] a few hours early and incorporate a walk and lunch together before the meeting. Last Wednesday we walked for two hours on [name of town] beach and the footpaths around the beach for almost two hours before going for a healthy lunch and then on to Book Club. [Names] also walk together for quite long distances more often. They are both on their own and have recently decided to meet every Wednesday to walk, weather permitting or do an indoor activity if the weather is bad. [Name] has set herself the challenge of walking the whole South-West Coastal Path in the Spring. She has done sections of it before but is now going to attempt to do the whole distance in April/May, taking about eight weeks! [Name] and I have said that we will join her for the odd day or half day to keep her company. At the other end of the spectrum, My husband and I have recently moved house within the village and one of my priorities has been to create a dedicated exercise room so that there are no barriers to give me an excuse not to do anything. Yesterday I managed to clear the majority of packing boxes out of the conservatory (the dedicated room) and used my exercise video this morning for the first time in months. I also have my exercise bike in there with plenty of space around it and intend to use it while the weather is bad so that I shall be fit enough to do real cycling when the weather improves. Thank you for including us in the project. It has been a really worthwhile experience and has had lasting impact on our lifestyles.' (feedback following participation in focus group. email, participant, 18/1/13) The experience of the interview was strange in that talking about yourself for so long is unusual and yet it opened up questions that had not really struck me before. it was a 'legitimate' opportunity to reflect upon the 'now' and has left me feeling that I understand being 60+ a little better. (participant, written feedback received after participant workshop, May 2013). Responses within focus groups (data collection) to watching the film: 'I think the film pointed out to me that there is, actually, a lot going on for elderly people to do sport and physical activity, which I wasn't really aware of' (midlife male) It definitely influenced me to make sure I stay more steady in exercise so it becomes second nature and then the gaps don't happen. Because then, obviously, otherwise the gaps would happen when I'm older. If it becomes part of your day to day, you know, it will pave the way for healthy ageing. (midlife female). '(Seeing the film) just made me feel more positive about growing older, really. It showed it in a more positive light' (young female) 3. New images of the ageing body Given the significant use of visual methods within this research (i.e. film and photography), a key output was to produce a wealth of visual data which could counter traditionally dominant stereotypes of decline, deterioration, isolation, disengagement, and so forth. That noted, such counter images also needed to represent (active) ageing realistically and in a variety of ways. Images of those who appear to defy the ageing process through heroic accomplishments (e.g. marathon running, bodybuilding) can in some instanced be equally unhelpful in preventing the marginalisation of ageing bodies. Our success in this venture - both in terms of production and appropriate circulation of counter images - is evidenced by their inclusion in a range of publications. Specifically, images produced from the research were used in the evaluation of AgeUK's 'Fit as a Fiddle' programme in the South West, the 2012 Director of Public Health Cornwall and Isles of Scilly Annual Report, and published book 'Physical Activity & Sport in Later Life: Critical Perspectives' (Palgrave). The findings from this research were instrumental in shaping the successful application to the ESRC Seminar Series (ES/M001709/1) which has further solidified the establishment of an engaged network of researchers, stakeholders and users within the field of ageing and physical activity.
First Year Of Impact 2012
Sector Education,Healthcare,Leisure Activities, including Sports, Recreation and Tourism
Impact Types Societal,Policy & public services
 
Description Catalyst Public Engagement Funding
Amount £4,000 (GBP)
Funding ID Catalyst Fund for Public Engagement 
Organisation Research Councils UK (RCUK) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK)
Start 08/2014 
End 01/2015
 
Description Physical activity among older people with sight loss : a qualitative research study to inform policy and practice
Amount £45,000 (GBP)
Organisation Thomas Pocklington Trust 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK)
Start 08/2012 
End 11/2013
 
Description Research for Patient Benefit (co-applicant)
Amount £250,000 (GBP)
Funding ID PB-PG-0214-33020 
Organisation National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK)
Start 05/2014 
End 07/2015
 
Description The Leverhulme Trust - Artist in Residence
Amount £15,000 (GBP)
Funding ID AIR_2012_22 
Organisation The Leverhulme Trust 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK)
Start 01/2012 
End 10/2012
 
Description Ageing and Physical Activity Network 
Organisation Birmingham City Council
Department Public Health Birmingham
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution I led collaborations with the above partners to establish a Ageing and Physical Activity Network. The purpose of this network was to build upon findings from the current project (and other recent literature), which calls for a more critical approach to be taken when researching later life physical activity. As primary investigator, I was successful in securing funding (£30k) for 8 seminars around this topic from the ESRC Seminar Series Scheme.
Collaborator Contribution Contributions were made in the from of disciplinary expertise, previous experience in applying for research funding (Brunel, Birmingham) and the sharing of contacts / established partnerships.
Impact (1/10/14 - 1/6/17). ESRC Seminar Series. (£30k) More of the Same is not Enough: New Directions in Ageing and Physical Activity. (with Wheeler, Victor, Thompson, Tulle, Piggin, Gough, Orr).
Start Year 2013
 
Description Ageing and Physical Activity Network 
Organisation Brunel University
Department Brunel Institute for Ageing Studies (BIAS)
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I led collaborations with the above partners to establish a Ageing and Physical Activity Network. The purpose of this network was to build upon findings from the current project (and other recent literature), which calls for a more critical approach to be taken when researching later life physical activity. As primary investigator, I was successful in securing funding (£30k) for 8 seminars around this topic from the ESRC Seminar Series Scheme.
Collaborator Contribution Contributions were made in the from of disciplinary expertise, previous experience in applying for research funding (Brunel, Birmingham) and the sharing of contacts / established partnerships.
Impact (1/10/14 - 1/6/17). ESRC Seminar Series. (£30k) More of the Same is not Enough: New Directions in Ageing and Physical Activity. (with Wheeler, Victor, Thompson, Tulle, Piggin, Gough, Orr).
Start Year 2013
 
Description Ageing and Physical Activity Network 
Organisation Leeds Metropolitan University
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I led collaborations with the above partners to establish a Ageing and Physical Activity Network. The purpose of this network was to build upon findings from the current project (and other recent literature), which calls for a more critical approach to be taken when researching later life physical activity. As primary investigator, I was successful in securing funding (£30k) for 8 seminars around this topic from the ESRC Seminar Series Scheme.
Collaborator Contribution Contributions were made in the from of disciplinary expertise, previous experience in applying for research funding (Brunel, Birmingham) and the sharing of contacts / established partnerships.
Impact (1/10/14 - 1/6/17). ESRC Seminar Series. (£30k) More of the Same is not Enough: New Directions in Ageing and Physical Activity. (with Wheeler, Victor, Thompson, Tulle, Piggin, Gough, Orr).
Start Year 2013
 
Description Ageing and Physical Activity Network 
Organisation Loughborough University
Department School of Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences (SSEHS)
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I led collaborations with the above partners to establish a Ageing and Physical Activity Network. The purpose of this network was to build upon findings from the current project (and other recent literature), which calls for a more critical approach to be taken when researching later life physical activity. As primary investigator, I was successful in securing funding (£30k) for 8 seminars around this topic from the ESRC Seminar Series Scheme.
Collaborator Contribution Contributions were made in the from of disciplinary expertise, previous experience in applying for research funding (Brunel, Birmingham) and the sharing of contacts / established partnerships.
Impact (1/10/14 - 1/6/17). ESRC Seminar Series. (£30k) More of the Same is not Enough: New Directions in Ageing and Physical Activity. (with Wheeler, Victor, Thompson, Tulle, Piggin, Gough, Orr).
Start Year 2013
 
Description Ageing and Physical Activity Network 
Organisation School of Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences
Department British Heart Foundation National Centre for Physical Activity and Health (BHFNC)
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I led collaborations with the above partners to establish a Ageing and Physical Activity Network. The purpose of this network was to build upon findings from the current project (and other recent literature), which calls for a more critical approach to be taken when researching later life physical activity. As primary investigator, I was successful in securing funding (£30k) for 8 seminars around this topic from the ESRC Seminar Series Scheme.
Collaborator Contribution Contributions were made in the from of disciplinary expertise, previous experience in applying for research funding (Brunel, Birmingham) and the sharing of contacts / established partnerships.
Impact (1/10/14 - 1/6/17). ESRC Seminar Series. (£30k) More of the Same is not Enough: New Directions in Ageing and Physical Activity. (with Wheeler, Victor, Thompson, Tulle, Piggin, Gough, Orr).
Start Year 2013
 
Description Ageing and Physical Activity Network 
Organisation University of Birmingham
Department School of Sport and Exercise Sciences Birmingham
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I led collaborations with the above partners to establish a Ageing and Physical Activity Network. The purpose of this network was to build upon findings from the current project (and other recent literature), which calls for a more critical approach to be taken when researching later life physical activity. As primary investigator, I was successful in securing funding (£30k) for 8 seminars around this topic from the ESRC Seminar Series Scheme.
Collaborator Contribution Contributions were made in the from of disciplinary expertise, previous experience in applying for research funding (Brunel, Birmingham) and the sharing of contacts / established partnerships.
Impact (1/10/14 - 1/6/17). ESRC Seminar Series. (£30k) More of the Same is not Enough: New Directions in Ageing and Physical Activity. (with Wheeler, Victor, Thompson, Tulle, Piggin, Gough, Orr).
Start Year 2013
 
Description Co-Editing a Book 
Organisation Glasgow Caledonian University (GCU)
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Development of a book proposal for an edited collection of chapters focusing on critical approaches to ageing and physical activity. This venture was a direct result of the end of award 2-day event held in July, 2012.
Collaborator Contribution The partner has contributed to the development of the proposal, the identification of authors, project management.
Impact Tulle, E. & Phoenix, C. (Eds.) (2015). Sport and Physical Activity across the Life Course: Critical Perspectives. Palgrave Macmillan.
Start Year 2013
 
Description Theatrescience 
Organisation Theatrescience
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Expertise on the topic of physical activity in later life. A collection of transcripts of life history interviews with 51 physically active older adults, which were used to develop a piece of verbatim theatre.
Collaborator Contribution Expertise in translating 'science' into theatre. Development of script, production and direction of Moving Stories Moving On. This public engagement event received funding from the RCUK Catalyst Fund.
Impact A theatrical production (one night) followed by audience discussion "Moving Stories Moving On" http://www.ecehh.org/events/moving-stories-theatre/ This was a multidisciplinary production between social science research and the arts.
Start Year 2013
 
Description Thomas Pocklington Trust 
Organisation Thomas Pocklington Trust
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution I (along with colleagues Griffin, Smith and Howe) responded to a commissioned call to conduct research into the experiences of physical activity amongst older adults with late onset sight loss. My expertise in and international reputation for both research on ageing and physical activity, and qualitative research methods ensured that this work was undertaken rigorously and in ways that could inform practice and policy.
Collaborator Contribution Funded further research into experiences of physical activity amongst older adults with late onset sight loss.
Impact Phoenix, C. Griffin, M. & Smith, B. (in press). Physical activity among older adults with sight loss: A qualitative research study to inform policy and practice. Public Health.
Start Year 2012
 
Description Article for The Conversation 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Invited contribution to The Conversation . This has currently read by over 8000 people around the world. The Story has been picked up by The Independent and The Western Australia News. A link to the article was Tweeted 110 times, shared on Facebook 315 times and shared 18 times on Linkedin.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://theconversation.com/improving-with-age-our-perception-of-growing-old-needs-some-get-up-and-g...
 
Description Grand Rounds (University of Miami) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact Talk sparked questions and discussion afterwards, particularly in relation to the use of qualitative methods to understand ageing and physical activity.

After my talk, I had a more in depth discussions with PhD students and advised them on appropriate methodologies.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012
 
Description Images of Research Competition (Highly Commended) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Approx. 100 people attended an Exhibition at the Edge Arts Centre, University of Bath as part of the Images of Research Competition at the University of Bath. My image was highly commended and displayed on the University website thereafter. As a consequence of this event, I was approached by the Conversation to submit an article on perceptions of ageing.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://www.flickr.com/photos/uniofbath/26718056902/in/album-72157667954297595/
 
Description Invited speaker: Bath University Physical Cultural Studies Group seminar series 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact A 40 minute presentation followed by 20 minutes of discussion to the Bath PCS group, during which I outlined the Moving Stories project, shared the short film produced as part of this project and discussed the politics of pleasure in relation to physical activity in older age.

After my talk, members of the audience contacted me to ask if they could use the short film produced as part of this research in their teaching activities. In addition, a member of the audience and I are currently exploring collaborative possibilities in the form of a joint publication.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Launch of Ageing & Physical Activity Blog site 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact A blog site was developed to communicate important outcomes from the Seminars to a broad and largely non-academic audience. The blog was visited by a member of Haringey Council's Adult's and Health Scrutiny Panel, who subsequently invited C. Phoenix to contribute to evidence gathering sessions re community level physical activity interventions.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://ageingpa.tumblr.com
 
Description Launch of photographic exhibition - Move. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact A photographic exhibition using images produced as part of the Moving Stories project. A launch night was held for this exhibition at a community café and included guests from the local council, primary care trust, health and fitness organisations (public and private), Director of AgeUK etc.

The launch sparked discussion about how the images could be used to challenge negative perceptions of ageing and inspire older adults to engage in physical activity.

The MOVE exhibition was made as a 'commitment' to the European Year of Active Ageing and Solidarity Between Generations and featured on their website: http://europa.eu/ey2012/ey2012main.jsp?catId=975?Id=en&mode=initDetail?itiativeId=431?itLangId=en

After the launch, contact was made by numerous attendees to request further information about the project and suggest venues for the exhibition in the future.
Requests have also been made by third parties to use the images in their own reports (e.g. evaluation of AgeUK's fit as a fiddle programme).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012
 
Description Leisure Studies Association newsletter 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact I was invited to write an article for the LSA newsletter for a special themed issue around Narrative and the Body in Sport and Leisure (see pg. 28). For this, I referred to the Moving Stories project to demonstrate how narrative can be used to gain insight into the lives of physically active older adults.

Recognition from peers who now associate me with leading research in narrative approaches to ageing and physical activity.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Peninsula Public Health Network: 'So you think you know ageing?' 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Health professionals
Results and Impact Invited to present at this event ("Ageing, exercise and the narrative of decline : insights from the lives of active older adults"). Talk sparked questions and discussion afterwards regarding practice.

After my talk, I was contacted by 3 members of the audience for further information about the audience. One of these worked at Westbank Community centre, Devon and I was subsequently invited to speak as part of their healthy Lifestyles programme.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012
 
Description University of Toronto - Guest Speaker 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact 30 minute discussion with the audience following this presentation regarding the results of the research and how they might be applied to ongoing work within the department.

After my talk, I was contacted by members of the audience who asked for further information about the study. It is likely that I will also act as an external examiner for one of the PhD students who attended. In this sense, impact was achieved by enhancing my academic profile internationally. This is central to the First Awards Scheme.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Westbank Community Centre, Devon 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Presentation at Westbank Community Centre, Devon as part of their 'Healthy Lifestyles' programme ("Health and wellbeing throughout the ageing process : lessons from physically active older adults"). Audience included programme members and health professionals delivering the programme. Talk sparked questions and discussion afterwards.

Following this event, people who used the community centre volunteered to participate in the research. I have received informal reports that members of the audience have since taken up new exercise behaviours (e.g. started riding a bike, joined a local tennis club for beginner lessons).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012
 
Description Workshop at Valencia University (Visual Methods in relation to Moving Stories project) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Visual methods workshop for postgraduate students (predominantly PhD) within the physical cultural studies research group at the University of Valencia, Spain.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017