Multi-platform media and the digital challenge: Strategy, Distribution and Policy

Lead Research Organisation: University of Glasgow
Department Name: School of Culture & Creative Arts

Abstract

This three-year project is about economic and social aspects of transformations taking place in the media industry as a result of digital convergence and growth of the internet. The study commenced in July 2012 and is led by Professor Gillian Doyle (PI), Professor Philip Schlesinger and Dr Katherine Champion at CCPR, University of Glasgow. It sets out to analyse the recent migration of media businesses towards diversified digital distribution and multi-platform growth strategies and the impact this has had on economic efficiency, the organisation of production, and on the nature and diversity of content. What challenges are faced by public policy?



Using key a multiple case study approach, the investigation involves interviews, document analysis, media content analysis and financial analysis and it aims to cover the following:






  • economic opportunities and advantages created by multi-platform expansion


  • the role of convergent digital technologies and the internet in encouraging such strategies


  • the impact of multi-platform on production of media content and on diversity and pluralism


  • implications for public policy and regulation.



Planned Impact

At a time of technological transition, media organizations operating both in the commercial and public sectors require knowledge of how the growth of the internet and advances in digital delivery have altered and potentially improved the economics of supplying media. They also need to know what impact this is having on the organization of cultural work. The proposed research, by examining how digital and multi-platform delivery has impacted on resource allocation and by identifying the economic advantages and opportunities which have encouraged migration towards a multi-platform outlook, promises to enhance understanding of current organizational strategies for adjusting to technological convergence. Therefore managers within the media industry are an important set of target beneficiaries. The project aims to provide industry participants with a deeper understanding of how technological transition can be negotiated and how to adapt their businesses to digitisation.

Policy-makers will also benefit from improved understanding of the implications of changing media technologies. Part of the aim of the project is to investigate how digital convergence and adoption of multi-platform strategies are affecting media content and content diversity. The potential drawbacks posed by concentrations of media ownership and by a lack of plurality within media provision are currently a pressing concern for policy and regulation both in the UK and internationally. The research-related knowledge which this project will generate about on the one hand, changing technology and the economic organization of media and, on the other, the changing nature of media output, will provide a timely and substantive evidence-based contribution to public policy debates on media pluralism and creative industries policies.

In addition to benefiting non-academic end users, the project aims to contribute to theory and to scholarship across a range of fields including media economics and management, media and cultural sociology and policy analysis as detailed in the 'Academic Beneficiaries' section above.

With regard to how exactly benefit and engagement will be ensured, the project team will use extensive existing contacts and establish new links with media industry participants and policy-making communities to create a dedicated network of stakeholders with a shared interest in the effects of changing technologies and growth in multi-platform strategies. Regular communication and exchange will be conducted via internet fora. The project's website will serve as a primary focus and access point for information. Target beneficiaries in professional industry and policy-making circles will be proactively alerted to key findings as they emerge to encourage engagement and ensure impact is maximised. The project team will foster dialogue with target users via participation in consultations and public debate. CCPR seminars on key emerging themes will be used to ensure productive engagement with target users within industry. Engagement will also be achieved through targeted dissemination of published outputs, attendance at conferences and industry meetings, and an End of Project symposium. We intend to produce a major research monograph (book) and several refereed journal articles (at least five) by project end in 2014 and will make sure our work is available through relevant online databases such as EUCLID. Accessible summaries of main outcomes will be posted on the project site and disseminated as a support resource at the final symposium.
 
Description This three-year project investigated how digital convergence and growth of the internet has affected media companies and content. It focused on the widespread migration of media businesses towards diversified digital distribution and multi-platform growth strategies and the impact this has had on economic efficiency, the organization of production, and on the nature and diversity of content.
Using key case studies in the television broadcasting, newspaper and magazine publishing sectors, the project examined:
Economic opportunities and advantages created by multi-platform expansion; how are digital platforms enabling media companies use their resources more cost effectively and serve their audiences and advertising clients better?
How multi-platform is affecting content decisions? How is it affecting production, commissioning and distribution decisions? To what extent has digital and multi-platform delivery encouraged innovation in content production and changed the organization of work?
How is more multi-platform production and distribution affecting diversity of media content and how, in a digital environment, is the role of brands changing?

The research team conducted extensive research focusing on a range of leading UK media organisations and related prominent media brands. Empirical research included interviews, analysis of financial data and content analysis.

Findings show how, as media companies have made the journey from being single sector to digital multi-platform suppliers of content, this has altered conditions for production and distribution of content and impacted on the economics of supplying media. Evidence gathered provides valuable insights into how a multi-media approach is affecting flows of jobs and investments across industry and to what extent this approach is enabling companies exploit their resources and serve audience demands more effectively.

Findings suggest key motivations for switching to a multi-platform approach are generally centred on the promise of advantages in two main areas. One relates to providing additional and improved access to content while the other relates to new forms of audience engagement.

Distribution on a multi-platform rather than single platform basis facilitates extended exploitation of IPRs in content, thus potentially yielding economies of scale and scope.

Another way that multi-platform digital distribution potentially creates advantage is that it allows for different modes of engagement with audiences. Use of the digital return path can provide extensive and valuable feedback on audience preferences and tastes while also enabling closer relationships to be forged, thus building brand loyalty.

However, adopting a multi-platform approach also involves many challenges including, in particular, that of understanding how best to harness and utilize interactivity on digital platforms. Producers and suppliers of media need to make tricky judgments around use of return path data in content decisions and product development. Another challenge is adapting to and exploiting programmatic advertising. A further challenge is, at a time of transition, that of managing a 'hybrid' approach - maintaining the appeal of traditional forms of output while at the same time investing appropriately in new platforms.

Our project findings suggest that the current migration towards multi-platform has altered not just media industry processes and output but, more fundamentally, it has re-configured the ways in which content is now being conceptualised and the sort of skills needed by media managers. In the competitive ecology of digital delivery, ownership and control of content that translates and appeals across multiple platforms is obviously advantageous but so too is ownership of content that is capable of distinguishing itself and that audiences will seek out for themselves across platforms. In managing a more complex and more dialogical interface with digital end-users, the need for new tools and skills that are effective in sustaining engagement is increasing, especially branding.

Factor reallocation.
One aspect of our research has been to examine factor reallocation - the incidence and magnitude of investment in new resources (such as equipment and job functions) and the concomitant attrition and disappearance of others that have become obsolete - as a marker of how media companies are re-inventing themselves and how the business as a whole is being transformed as converging digital technology has transformed the nature and composition of factors required to be a successful media supplier.
Although the exact extent and pace of change through factor reallocation varies from one sector to another and from one organization to another, the general pattern emerging from our research is one of, across the board, a progressive strengthening of digital skills in areas such as, in television, interface design and software development; and in publishing, digital page editing, video production and interactive graphics. This change has been achieved partly through re-training but also through redundancies and new recruitment. In addition, legacy media companies in all sectors have made substantial investments in the systems and equipment needed to support digital multi-platform production and distribution. In print publishing, extensive investment has been made into content management systems (CMSs) that allow journalists to do more of the work on assembly, headlines, pictures, layout and so on that, in previous years, required separate specialist editorial staff. New CMSs also make it easier to publish and distribute across multiple digital as well the traditional print formats.

Content
With regard to how multi-platform strategies are affecting content, more distribution across digital platforms has generally increased reliance on and use of return path data in content decisions. But television companies and print publishers are wary of excessive reliance on automated responsive product development and most wish to avoid 'editing by numbers'.
Strategies and approaches to how content is adapted for and used across multiple distribution platforms vary by sector, company, product and revenue model. Some organisations are inherently more speedy and ambitious in adapting to technological change and perceived digital opportunities.
Multi-platform strategies have generally encouraged a vast expansion in the volumes of media content being supplied by companies and made available to media audiences. Some of the increase in volume of content is accounted for by additional material, E.g. addition of user/ audience generated content; addition of video content in digital formats for newspapers and magazines. But the need to supply content across multiple platforms has in some cases encouraged strategies of re-use and re-cycling of identical content.

Cost effectiveness.
One of the interesting findings is that multi-platform strategies have encouraged a vast expansion in the volumes of media content supplied and made available to media audiences at a time when, generally, the production budgets of media organisations have been tightly constrained. How is this possible? How has the transition to a multi-platform environment facilitated such abundance in output and an apparently miraculous increase in levels of productivity across the media industry?

Our project findings indicate that the journey to multi-platform has created some pressures towards focusing on a relatively small number of high profile stories and brands because this is the most practical way to meet audience and advertiser demand for a multi-layered multi-platform experience from within constrained budgets.

Newspapers and Magazines.
While strategies for renewal based on adoption of a multi- platform approach can vary considerably from one press group to the next, the experience of the UK national newspaper sector indicates some communalities of experience that offer potentially valuable lessons for media and publishing businesses more widely. Our findings suggest that the adoption of a multiplatform distribution strategy is affecting the organization of production activities, with much more emphasis on data analytics. One very key challenge for newspaper publishers is to overcome the ongoing supremacy of traditional journalistic cultures. Production routines at many newspapers and magazines still reflect the contingencies of the print era (with fresh material being posted up online as the print deadline approaches) and, despite ambitions to adopt a 'digital first' approach, getting work practices to adjust to digital consumption patterns remains a substantial challenge.
Findings also highlight the crucial importance to the success of a digital multiplatform strategy of effective integration between IT, commercial and editorial functions and a willingness to experiment and innovate in relation to harnessing the benefits of two-way connectivity.

Television.
One of the issues considered in the course of our research has been how the role of the broadcast channel - traditionally the main vector via which audiences have enjoyed television content - may now be threatened by the rise of online rivals and accompanying pressures to adjust to a digital multiplatform environment. Drawing on the experience of BBC Three, we considered: to what extent is there an economic justification for switching from 'the channel' as the distribution format to an online-only service? Our findings suggest that, for established channels switching to online-only unlikely to be economically justified. Although consumption habits (especially among the young) are changing and SVOD services such as Netflix are growing in importance, linear channels remain the key touch point for delivery of TV content and are likely to remain so well into the future.

Policy.
Our project findings concerning how content is affected by multi-platform strategies contributes to the knowledge available to support and inform policy-making, particularly in relation to diversity and pluralism, at a time when these are recurrent concerns on national and international media policy agendas. While multi-platform publishing is in some ways contributing to a widening of content diversity and choice it is also, as our findings demonstrate, in many cases encouraging re-cycling of the same content across multiple platforms and therefore promoting greater emphasis on a narrow range of high impact material. A further aspect of the transition to distribution across digital platforms which raises questions for pluralism is that of personalized products. To the extent that use of return path data by news media to tailor and individualize services so that they contain only those stories deemed to be of relevance to any particular reader (thus assisting targeted advertising) in on the increase, from the individual reader's point of view such filtering comes at the cost of a progressive diminution in the range and diversity of content to which s/he is exposed. Thus, our project findings underline critical questions about the implications for content and for policy of an ever-growing commitment to multi-platform strategies.
Exploitation Route Emerging findings concerning strategic responses to digital convergence offer valuable lessons for media industry end users. Managers of media organisations, in designing and implementing suitable corporate and operational strategies for the digital era, can draw on the insights provided by this project about how distribution on multiple digital platforms is enabling differing forms of audience engagement and offering opportunities for more cost-effective use of media resources more cost. Project findings provide useful knowledge in relation to how a multi-media approach has altered conditions for production of media and media content and how the transition to multi-platform is affecting flows of jobs and investments across industry. This knowledge can be put to use by industry participants as they seek to adjust effectively and successfully to the challenges of a digitally convergent media environment.
Data concerning the association between, on the one hand, digital convergence and the adoption of multi-platform strategies and, on the other, emerging trends in diversity of media content have strong potential to inform policy debate. Project findings may also contribute knowledge in other key areas including the role of creative industries policies, copyright and emerging business models.
Sectors Creative Economy,Digital/Communication/Information Technologies (including Software),Other
URL http://www.gla.ac.uk/schools/cca/research/ccpr/researchinccpr/multi-platformmediaandthedigitalchallengestrategydistributionandpolicy/
 
Description At a time when growth in digital media distribution has transformed relationships between suppliers of media and audiences, this project has created research-based knowledge about how development of digital delivery platforms has altered and potentially improved the economics of supplying media. The research has contributed impact by building a deeper and clearer understanding of the creative and commercial opportunities created by these developments. The nature of the project involved extensive contact with senior level industry participants across all sectors of the media and, drawing on their existing links, the investigators used this to develop a community of industry stakeholders who were engaged with the project throughout its lifetime and beyond completion. Through ongoing dialogue and through participation, organisation and/or involvement in a range of knowledge exchange events attended by key industry stakeholders including broadcasters, newspaper and magazine executives and other media practitioners and decision-makers, the investigators promoted user interaction discussion, debate and engagement with key findings. Thus, impact was achieved by engaging, imparting knowledge to and therefore contributing towards the ability of incumbent media suppliers operating in the commercial or private sector and also in the public sector (e.g. the BBC) to understand better how to adjust successfully to technological change and to provide innovative content and services that meet audience needs and desires. Our project also achieved impact by contributing to improved knowledge concerning public policy responses to digital convergence. The findings we produced concerned how multi-platform distribution is affecting content and how diversity within media provision is affected constitute an original empirically-based contribution to knowledge in an area of ongoing concern to media policy-making - pluralism. The knowledge exchange aspects of the project have facilitated impact through enabling the investigators to engage policy-makers in events promoting discussion and debate around the use of new distribution technologies by media organisations; the economic effectiveness of indigenous UK and European media suppliers; and the implications of changing content strategies for diversity, audiences and society. Because of this work, the project investigators have been invited to engage with and provide advice to public policy-making institutions and bodies and to present findings at meetings attended by policy-makers. For example the PI (Doyle) was invited by UK regulator Ofcom to participate in roundtable discussion of measures for online audience measurement; and was invited to address an EPP Hearing at the European Parliament on the implications for media and for policy-making of digital convergence; and, in 2016 (following completion of the project) has been appointed a member of the European Expert Network on Culture and Audiovisual (EENCA) funded by DG Education and Culture whose purpose is to provide research-based advice and analysis that enhances the Commission's understanding of the challenges faced by cultural and creative sectors and that supports the development of cultural and audiovisual policies in the European Union. Thus, the legacy created by this project through engagement of users from industry and policy-making communities continues to develop.
First Year Of Impact 2012
Sector Creative Economy,Digital/Communication/Information Technologies (including Software),Other
Impact Types Cultural,Societal,Economic,Policy & public services
 
Description Converged Media: opportunities and challenges for the European audiovisual media sector
Geographic Reach Asia 
Policy Influence Type Gave evidence to a government review
Impact Gillian Doyle gave an invited address, based on research findings, at EPP Hearing on 'Converged Media: opportunities and challenges for the European audiovisual media sector' at the European Parliament on October 16th 2013. The event was attended by high level industry practitioners and EU policy-makers, including Lorena Boix-Alonso, Head of Unit, Converging Media and Content, DG CONNECT, European Commission and the research findings presented and discussed helped inform thinking about the emerging commercial, regulatory and public policy challenges for the European audiovisual sector in the context of the European Commission Green Paper, Preparing for a Fully Converged Audiovisual World: Growth, Creation and Values.
URL http://www.eppgroup.eu/event/Hearing-on-Converged-Media
 
Description Multi-platform media and the digital challenge: Strategy, Distribution and Policy, End-of-project Symposium, RSA, London, 12 June 2015.
Geographic Reach Europe 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
Impact Event contributed to improved understanding on the part of practitioners and policy-makers of the economic and social effects of multi-platform strategies thus helping to inform thinking on emerging challenges for policy-making, for example in relation to regulation of converged industries, plurality of media provision, consumer privacy, and promotion of competition.
 
Description Participation in 'Measuring Online News Consumption and Supply' Roundtable event
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
Impact Participation in this closed roundtable event organised by Reuters Institute and Ofcom in London on 9th December 2014 helped contribute to improved understanding on the part of practitioners and policy-makers of emerging methods of online and multi-platform audience measurement.
 
Description Participation in 'Pilot implementation of the Media Pluralism Monitor (MPM2014): Conclusions and recommendations for future implementation',
Geographic Reach Asia 
Policy Influence Type Participation in advisory committee
Impact Gillian Doyle, Invited participant in 'Pilot implementation of the Media Pluralism Monitor (MPM2014): Conclusions and recommendations for future implementation', Workshop held at the Centre for Media Pluralism and Media Freedom (CMPF), EUI, Florence on September 30, 2014. Event, which was well attended by European media industry practitioners and policy-makers, stimulated discussion and debate about efficacy of revised MPM and about need for further adjustments.
URL http://cmpf.eui.eu/News/All/140929MPM14conclusions.aspx
 
Title Content in a Multi-Platform Context 
Description As part of the 'Multi-platform media and the digital challenge' project, data concerning the composition of media content for selected content bundles at case study organisations was collected and analysed over the three year period (2013-2015). Using Excel spreadsheets, coding and analysis was carried out of a sample of content outputs for selected case studies in the broadcasting, newspaper and magazine sectors during specified time intervals in Spring 2013, 2014 and 2015. The resulting data set provides a basis for preliminary comparative analysis, across organisations, sectors of the media and time, of how the composition of media content outputs has changed while suppliers of media have migrated towards multi-platform delivery. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2015 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact The dataset 'Content in a Multi-Platform Context' plus a brief description of methods used in data collection have been submitted to the UK data service: Reshare. This is intended to enable other other end-users to benefit both from an understanding of the methodologies used in this project and from access to dataset generated by the project from which additional new insights may potentially be derived. 
 
Description 'Converged Media: opportunities and challenges for the European audiovisual media sector', EPP Hearing at the European Parliament 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/parliamentarians
Results and Impact Gillian Doyle, Invited address at EPP Hearing on Converged Media: opportunities and challenges for the European audiovisual media sector at the European Parliament on October 16, 2013. Event well attended by European media industry practitioners and policy-makers. Event stimulated debate and discussion.

Discussion during and after event helped inform thinking about the emerging commercial, regulatory and public policy challenges for the European audiovisual sector in the context of the European Commission Green Paper, Preparing for a Fully Converged Audiovisual World: Growth, Creation and Values.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
URL http://www.eppgroup.eu/event/Hearing-on-Converged-Media
 
Description 'Opportunities in a digital age' 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Philip Schlesinger, 'Opportunities in a digital age', Scottish Newspaper Society Conference 2014, Glasgow, 24th April 2014, presentation. Attendance by high level industry practitioners which resulted in lively discussion and questions.

Increased interest in project outcomes.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.scotns.org.uk/
 
Description 'Pilot implementation of the Media Pluralism Monitor (MPM2014): Conclusions and recommendations for future implementation', Workshop held at the CMPF, EUI, Florence 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/parliamentarians
Results and Impact Gillian Doyle, Invited participant in 'Pilot implementation of the Media Pluralism Monitor (MPM2014): Conclusions and recommendations for future implementation', Workshop held at the Centre for Media Pluralism and Media Freedom (CMPF), EUI, Florence on September 30, 2014. Event attended by media industry practitioners from across Europe and EU policy-makers.

After participation, I had further dialogue with the MPM formulation team about adjustments needed to the Media Pluralism Monitor to ensure it is up-to-date with multi-platform developments.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://cmpf.eui.eu/News/All/140929MPM14conclusions.aspx
 
Description Can we trust the media? Public event at the Edinburgh International Book Festival 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Philip Schlesinger, Invited panel member, Can we trust the media? Public event at the Edinburgh International Book Festival, Edinburgh, August 17, 2013

Presentation stimulated discussion and debate.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
URL https://www.edbookfest.co.uk/the-festival/whats-on/can-we-trust-the-media
 
Description Internet markets, advertising, news publishing and pluralism in the Multi-platform Era 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Gillian Doyle, Invited presentation on 'Internet markets, advertising, news publishing and pluralism' to journalists and media practitioners from across Europe at the EU-funded Centre for Media Pluralism and Media Freedom (CMPF) based at the European University Institute in Florence on May 26th, 2015. Presentation stimulated discussion, questions and debate.

My presentation stimulated interest in the findings of the Multi-platform media and the Digital Challenge project.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Invited address on 'Challenges facing EU Audiovisual and Cultural Industries' at Cultural Industries: Pivoting to Asia? symposium 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Gillian Doyle gave an invited address on 'Challenges facing EU Audiovisual and Cultural Industries' at Cultural Industries: Pivoting to Asia? a symposium organised by the Academy of Korean Studies (AKS) and European Centre for International Political Economy (ECIPE) in Brussels on December 7th 2015.
Presentation stimulated discussion and debate and contributed to improved understanding on the part of industry practitioners and EU policy-makers of how adjustment to a digital environment is affecting the performance of the EU audiovisual sector and implications for policy.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Multi-platform media and the digital challenge: Strategy, Distribution and Policy, End-of-project Symposium 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Gillian Doyle organised 'Multi-platform media and the digital challenge: Strategy, Distribution and Policy, End-of-project Symposium' at the RSA, London, on 12 June 2015. Presentation of project findings stimulated discussion and debate amongst media industry strategists and senior managers and Uk and EU policy-makers.

This event was well attended by media industry leaders and strategists and also UK and EU policy-makers and it stimulated their interest in engaging with the findings of the Multi-platform project and in using project findings to inform strategy and decision-making.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Plenary presentation on multi-platform distribution and windowing strategies 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Gillian Doyle delivered an invited plenary presentation on multi-platform distribution and changes in windowing strategies at the international conference on Private Television in Europe in Brussels on 3rd June 2015 which focused on competition issues in television broadcasting markets. Presentation stimulated discussion and debate.

My presentation stimulated interest in the findings of the Multi-platform media and the digital challenge project amongst European media practitioners and policy-makers.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Reflections on Future of the Printed Media 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Philip Schlesinger, Invited panel member, 'The Future of the Printed Media', public event at the University of Glasgow, chaired by Andrew Neil, March 4 2013. Event well attended by Scottish newspaper industry practitioners, policy-makers and public. Presentation stimulated discussion and debate.

Increased interest in project outcomes.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Researching Media at a Time of Transition 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Gillian Doyle organised Researching Media at a Time of Transition, a Workshop for PhDs and early career researchers, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, 10 June 2015. Workshop stimulated questions, discussion and debate.

Workshop provided an opportunity to disseminate and exchange information about methodologies thus contributing to capacity building amongst early stage researchers. It also stimulated interest in the findings of the Multi-platform project.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Securing Scotland's voice: strategic responses to the digital media revolution in the national press 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Type Of Presentation workshop facilitator
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Philip Schlesinger, Co-chair/co-organiser, Securing Scotland's voice: strategic responses to the digital media revolution in the national press, RSE Workshops Award-supported CCPR seminar, University of Glasgow, 4 June 2013. Event well attended by media industry practitioners, policy-makers and international scholars. Presentation stimulated discussion and debate.

Increased interest in project outcomes.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Stateless Nations and Independent Nation States: Digital Press Ecologies in Catalonia, the Basque Country, Norway, Denmark and Quebec 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Type Of Presentation workshop facilitator
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Philip Schlesinger, Co-Chair/ Co-Organiser, Stateless Nations and Independent Nation States: Digital Press Ecologies in Catalonia, the Basque Country, Norway, Denmark and Quebec, RSE Workshops Award-Supported CCPR Seminar, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, October 14th 2013. Event well attended by media industry practitioners, policy-makers and international scholars. Presentation stimulated discussion and debate.

Increased interest in project outcomes.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description UK Press: Current challenges and Business Models 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Gillian Doyle, Invited speaker on 'UK Press: Current challenges and Business Models', at Securing Scotland's voice: strategic responses to the digital media revolution in the national press, RSE Workshops Award-supported CCPR seminar, University of Glasgow, June 4 2013. Event well attended by media industry practitioners, policy-makers and international scholars. Presentation stimulated discussion and debate.

Increased interest in project outcomes.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013