Family inclusive policy and practice after 'Think Family'

Lead Research Organisation: University of Birmingham
Department Name: Institute of Applied Social Sciences

Abstract

Although there is a long history of social work and other practitioners involving wider family in trying to resolve difficulties faced by particular family members, the evidence base to support this activity has been relatively weak. Since the early 1990s, a number of developments in law, policy and performance management have had the perhaps unintended consequence of directing agencies and practitioners to focus on specific needs and risks relating to particular individuals, rather than seeing the 'bigger picture' of how family networks actually operate and what might be their potential to provide more effective support or resolve issues for those experiencing difficulties.

In more recent years, there has been increasing recognition at government level that this tendency has been counter-productive in terms of delivering services that actually enable people to resolve or manage their difficulties - and has instead resulted in responses that are both costly and can hook people into an unnecessary longer term dependence on a range of public services. However, there has been much less clarity as how best to turn around approaches to service delivery and what might be the best models for delivering services that engage the potential of families and their social networks.

Policy initiatives such as 'Think Family' and 'Troubled Families' have fostered the development of new models and ways of working at a local level and in a variety of organisational contexts. From recent research studies and evaluations, we now have some emerging evidence as to 'what works' within specific service contexts - and also what may be barriers to implementing such approaches within existing organisational structures and processes. However, our understanding is far from complete - and what we currently know has not yet been pulled together across different service contexts in a systematic way that can be shared more widely with policy and practice organisations.

It is the purpose of this proposal to bring together academic and practice communities to facilitate an interchange of knowledge, ideas and evidence that can be used to drive forward effective and innovatory practice - with different service sectors learning from one another. Maximum impact would be achieved by three linked areas of work:
A. Building links within and between organisations to enable a two-way flow that brings in new knowledge and understanding from outside and, in return, gives space for reflection and evaluation of how service innovations are actually working (or not working) as they are applied on the ground.
B. A programme of knowledge exchange seminars and more informal workshops that bring together service managers and practitioners from across health, social care and the voluntary sector, with a particular emphasis on building bridges between services in different sectors.
C. Development of a protected 'partners' website for informal exchange of information and discussion of ideas in development. This would provide a platform for developing research summaries, descriptions of effective service models, discussion papers and training resources. Once developed, these would then be made publically accessible via the Family Potential Research Centre website for practitioners and managers.

Taken together, these three strands of knowledge exchange activity will achieve direct impact on policies and models of service delivery within around thirty participating organisations during the lifetime of the project. Beyond this, it will have wider cross-sector impact through making available the resources that have been developed, so that they can be utilised by other organisations who are facing similar challenges of how to to introduce ways of working that see beyond the individual, and mobilise the potential of wider family relationships in improving and sustaining positive outcomes for family members.

Planned Impact

It is recognised from the outset that there can be little space within many health and social care agencies for practitioners and mangers to learn from (and contribute to) relevant research. Nevertheless, we already have interest from a cross-section of organisations across England towards developing more family inclusive policies and modes of practice, as this is starting to be seen as essential if services are to meet the challenges that they are now facing.

This proposal builds on an emerging network of committed organisations that spans statutory and voluntary sector provision and offers an infrastructure whereby the space within organisations for learning, evaluating and training could be opened up to, and shared with, a wider supported community of practice. This would be facilitated by the lead Universities and the Family Potential Research Centre. By this approach, key staff in participating organisations can, in a real sense, feel ownership of driving forward and evaluating the implementation of new models of practice - thereby maximising the potential impact of research in this field.

In turn, this translation of ideas and evidence into practice, and the resultant exchange of knowledge between academia and the field, will be captured in the form of Papers and accessible learning resources that can be made available nationally via the development of the outward facing Family Potential website.

Who will benefit?
The intended beneficiaries of the knowledge exchange will be health, social care and voluntary sector service organisations and, more importantly, the families and family members who are seeking help from them. Around thirty participating organisations, and those who use their services, may be expected to receive the most immediate benefit. In the longer term, with the knowledge and learning resources that are generated through the project being made generally available via the Family Potential website, it is anticipated that there will be potential benefit across the sector nationally.

How will they benefit?
Service organisations will benefit through using research evidence and knowledge from the field to embed ways of working that are more effective in mobilising family resources. Such a shift would reduce the likelihood of re-referral or ongoing dependence on services - thereby both improving outcomes and cutting costs so as to achieve a more efficient use of limited human and financial resources.
Families will benefit from services that include and take seriously the concerns and aspirations of all family members - and which help them to build on their collective resources, strengths and capabilities, rather than focusing just on what they cannot do or have not been able to do well. In turn, this should lead to their having more control and greater confidence in their ability to resolve their own difficulties and improve their lives - resulting in enhanced wellbeing and greater opportunity for family members to participate in the social and economic life of their communities.

Publications


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Featherstone B (2016) Let's stop feeding the risk monster: Towards a social model of 'child protection' in Families, Relationships and Societies
Morris K (2017) Out of time: theorizing family in social work practice in Child & Family Social Work
 
Title Audiofiles 
Description During the course of the ESRC Knowledge Exchange seminar series, recordings of the speakers and subsequent debates were made. These recordings were uploaded onto the Family Potential website under the previous events listings, so that they are available for people to listen to. In addition to the general podcasts, a traditional Maori birth song sung by Moana Eruera was recorded relating to her presentation 'Whakapapa, whanau - relational identity in care and protection'. This can also be found on the Family Potential website. 
Type Of Art Artefact (including digital) 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact There were requests made by practitioners (in health and social care) who attended the events and those who were unable to make it, for materials to be made available from the seminars. There has been good engagement from practitioner audiences and the resources developed from those seminars are now openly available online for use in both informing local authority planning and development around families, or for training purposes. 
URL http://www.familypotential.org/?page_id=29
 
Description Key Findings

The Knowledge Exchange has achieved the mobilisation of a broad community of interest around the development and understanding of family-inclusive ways of working - with a focus on models and approaches that are genuinely innovative, and the theories, policies and practices that underpin these. A key finding has been that, despite changes in government and a shifting policy agenda, there has been a continuous and ongoing process of development and innovation, across a range of organisations and sectors, since the unveiling of the Cabinet Office 'Think Family' policy initiative in 2007 - which was based on a commissioned literature review that was led by members of the research team (Morris et al, 2008).

At a policy level, a comprehensive literature review of developments since the inception of the 'Think Family' stream of policy and practice has been augmented by current knowledge from the field. The latter has identified particular sites of development (Local Authority and wider) and also systemic factors that may be inhibiting the development of such approaches. This has been summarised for a policy and practitioner audience in Tew et al (2016). This chapter, together with more specific information about promising initiatives, has been made available via the Family Potential Research Centre website www.familypotential.org.

At a theoretical level, the Knowledge Exchange has been helpful in teasing out a more sophisticated understanding of the levels of 'family mindedness' first identified in the 2007 'Think Family' literature review - and, in particular, identifying practice and policy models that start with a relational conception of family processes and practices, rather than those which start with a focus just on an individual's needs or on a binary (or 'axial') relationships in which one family member is just defined as a 'carer' or 'parent'. It has also provided a forum for developing thinking around more specific ideas such as researching and theorising the impact of trauma at a system level - the subject of a Journal article in preparation.

The Knowledge Exchange has provided a forum for exploring research evidence in relation not just to 'what works' but also 'how it works'. This has included presenting research on established and innovative approaches in mental health and how approaches such as Family Group Conferencing or young carers' initiatives can be transformative in relation, not just to outcomes for particular families, but also in bringing about wider system change. Associated with this, a Paper entitled 'Family-inclusive approaches to reablement in mental health: models, mechanisms and outcomes' has been accepted for publication by the British Journal of Social Work. Perhaps the most productive aspect of the Knowledge Exchange has been learning across sectors - for example, with links (and challenges) being made between relationally oriented approaches rooted in ideas of restorative practice (e.g. in youth justice) and those rooted in ideas of recovery (primarily in mental health and in family support projects).

References:
Morris, K, Hughes, N, Clarke, H, Tew, J, et al (2008) Think family: a literature review of whole family approaches. Cabinet Office Social Exclusion Task Force

Tew, J, Morris, K, White, S Featherstone, B and Fenton S-J (2016) What has happened to 'Think Family': challenges and achievements in implementing family inclusive practice' in Dickens, M (ed) Parental Mental Health and Child Welfare Work Vol 1. Pavilion.


At a theoretical level, the Knowledge Exchange has been teasing out a more sophisticated understanding of the levels of 'family mindedness' first identified in the 2008 'Think Family' literature review - and, in particular, identifying practice and policy models that start with a relational conception of family processes and practices, rather than those which start with an individual's needs or a binary or axial relationship in which one family member is just defined as 'carer' or 'parent'. This will be the subject of a Journal article in preparation. It has also provided a forum for developing thinking around more specific ideas such as researching and theorising the impact of trauma at a system level.

At a policy level, a comprehensive literature review of developments since the inception of the 'Think Family' stream of policy and practice in 2008 has been augmented by current knowledge from the field. The latter has identified particular sites of development (Local Authority and wider) and also what are currently being identified as systemic factors or drivers that may be inhibiting the development of such approaches. This has been summarised for a policy and practitioner audience in the Paper What has happened to 'Think Family': challenges and achievements in implementing family inclusive practice - with more specific information about promising initiatives being made available via the Family Potential Research Centre website www.familypotential.org.

The Knowledge Exchange has provided a forum for exploring research evidence in relation not just to 'what works' but also 'how it works'. This has included presenting research on established and innovative approaches in mental health (Journal Paper in submission) and how approaches such as Family Group Conferencing or family-oriented young carers initiatives can be transformative in relation, not just to outcomes for particular families, but also in bringing about wider system change. Perhaps the most productive aspect of this has been learning across sectors - for example, with links (and challenges) being made between relationally oriented approaches rooted in ideas of restorative practice (e.g. in criminal justice and child protection) and those rooted in ideas of recovery (primarily in mental health).
Exploitation Route The Knowledge Exchange has identified, explored and evaluated models of 'whole family' policy and practice that go beyond the range of existing approaches - such as parenting programmes and carers' initiatives - that are currently on offer in many localities. The most immediate impact will be on agencies that were already actively moving in this direction.

A number of public and voluntary sector services are considering the reconfiguration of their services so that they more family inclusive. Some such developments are taking place within a specific sector - e.g. child protection services in Leeds and the piloting of Open Dialogue mental health services in NHS Trusts in London, Kent, Somerset and Nottinghamshire. Some Local Authorities are now embarking on a more holistic transformation that brings together the work of the Authority across children's and adults' social care, 'troubled families', public health and education (e.g. West Berkshire and, to a significant extent, Birmingham). Some initiatives cross agency boundaries with the lead coming from voluntary sector organisations who are working with both Local Authorities and NHS Trusts (e.g. Liverpool, Manchester, Gloucestershire).

Through the seminars and the materials available via the web, a second tranche of agencies are showing interest - and academic co-applicants of the Knowledge Exchange have been invited to provide consultancy, evaluation and 'masterclasses' for practitioners and managers. Dr Jerry Tew and Prof Brid Featherstone have each been invited to contribute webinars on the Children's Social Work Matters portal in the Yorkshire and Humber region which give a reach to over 1,600 Children's Social Work professionals.
Sectors Communities and Social Services/Policy,Healthcare,Government, Democracy and Justice
URL http://www.familypotential.org
 
Description The purpose of the ESRC grant was to explore developments in 'whole family' thinking in policy and practice. There were three identified workstreams: Workstream A - Developing research and innovation infrastructure within and between partner organisations Workstream B - Knowledge Exchange seminars Workstream C - Web-based Knowledge Exchange. Delivering the Knowledge Exchange across the three workstreams has been achieved through hosting four 'headline' seminar events; the development of resources which are made available to the wider policy and practice community though the website; reviewing the literature around whole-family approaches; and establishing, managing and maintaining a growing network of academics, practitioners, managers and policy makers. Workstream A - the Knowledge Exchange has engaged with a network of around 25 partner organisations, including a range of Local Authorities, NHS and voluntary sector organisations, together with the Department of Health. These included both organisations that had offered contributions as part of the original bid and other organisations that subsequently joined the programme of activity. The Knowledge Exchange has also linked in to and contributed to the development of existing or emerging policy and practice networks, such as those around parental mental health and child welfare, and the development of Family Group Conferencing across children's and adult services. Through development work with these partner organisations, practitioners and managers have been enabled to evaluate and learn in relation to their specific areas of experience; to (co)present at events both linked specifically to the Knowledge Exchange and at conferences and meetings linked to these other networks; and to publish alongside academic contributors in a format suitable for a wider practitioner audience. We worked closely with the editor of the Pavilion Annual on Parental Mental Health and Child Welfare Work, and the 2015/16 edition included 6 Papers that arose directly from the Knowledge Exchange. Alongside this, the academic leads of the Knowledge Exchange have provided masterclasses and other such inputs for local and regional practitioner networks. An indication of the 'reach' of the Knowledge Exchange has been that over 170 individuals from outside the academic sector have so far signed up to the mailing list - the majority from Local Authorities, but with substantial representation from the voluntary sector, NHS organisations and central government. Workstream B - Across the four Knowledge Exchange Seminars that have taken place so far, a total of 178 individuals have participated - attracting both an academic audience (approximately 25% of attendees were academics from a range of universities) and a wider audience from policy and practice roles, including Chief Social Workers from England and New Zealand. The format of each seminar has included a balance of short presentations from academic researchers and from practitioners, trainers, service directors and family members with a view to stimulating round-table or workshop discussion between participants that capitalised on their varied experience and backgrounds. The final event in April 2016 was oversubscribed - and over one half of the participants were newly joining the Knowledge Exchange process. By holding seminars in different locations (London, Sheffield, Birmingham and Huddersfield) we have been able to draw in participants from across England, including Cornwall, Kent, Merseyside and Northumberland (see map www.familypotential.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/ESRCKE-FPRCmap2016.pdf). In addition to the seminars, specialist groups have been brought together to look at issues of mutual interest and to share practice learning and experience (for example parental mental health and child welfare; development of Family Group Conferencing in adult services). Workstream C: The ESRC Knowledge Exchange was nested deliberately within a virtual environment - the website of the Family Potential Research Centre www.familypotential.org, which was launched to coincide with the Knowledge Exchange programme. This has been particularly important when building a brand identity around this area of work for practitioner audiences. In nesting the networks and relationships developed through the ESRC Knowledge Exchange process in this way, it has allowed for the conversation to continue and for collaborations and partnerships to continue to occur once the grant-funded work was completed at the end of April 2016. A broader community of interest in the policy and practice communities has been engaged through twitter, e-mail correspondence, and through interest generated by the website. During the course of the Knowledge Exchange, the website generated over 4300 page views. On the website, the presentations and discussions from the Knowledge Exchange seminars have been made accessible to the wider policy and practitioner community via downloadable audio podcasts as well as written notes of presentations and summaries of discussions. Presenters and attendees have posted blogs as a way of promoting debate and knowledge exchange beyond the specific events - and twitter has provided an effective means of alerting the wider policy and practice community about new ideas, evidence and dialogues. In addition, the website hosts and provides an opportunity for disseminating information about projects and services adopting innovative approaches for engaging with whole families - together with digests of and links to relevant research reports and publications. At a more practical level, it also provides a noticeboard for upcoming conferences and training events of interest to the practitioner community. The most tangible impact on policy is to be found in the joint Care Act implementation guidance on The Care Act and Whole-Family Approaches which has been published in draft form by the Department of Health, the Association of Directors of Adult Services, the Local Government Association, the Children's Society and the Carers' Trust http://www.local.gov.uk/documents/10180/5756320/The+Care+Act+and+whole+family+approaches/080c323f-e653-4cea-832a-90947c9dc00c. This guidance marks a major step-change in government policy, with 'Think Family' principles being applied in a comprehensive way for the first time in an adult services context. Theoretically, it also marks a shift from the implicit prioritisation of the individual in the earlier 'Think Child, Think Parent, Think Family' pilots that had sought to bring together children's and mental health services. Within this guidance, Step One is defined as 'Think Family'. While the preparation of this document predated the formal start of the Knowledge Exchange Programme, it draws explicitly on the idea of 'Think Family' and two of the key bodies involved in its preparation were also involved from the outset in the Knowledge Exchange - the Department of Health (represented by the Chief Social Worker for Adults) and the Carers' Trust. The Seminars and networking activity provided an opportunity to share and embed the ideas put forward in the guidance with a wider community of local authority and voluntary sector organisations. There is a growing interest among local authorities in implementing genuine 'whole family' approach in local policies and protocols - for example in rolling out a Family Group conferencing approach in adult social care, as evidenced by the attendance of over 30 at a recent UK networking event for local authorities hosted by the London Borough of Camden in May 2016.
First Year Of Impact 2015
Sector Communities and Social Services/Policy,Healthcare,Government, Democracy and Justice
Impact Types Policy & public services
 
Description Draft Guidance on The Care Act and Whole-Family Approaches - Department of Health, ADASS, LGA, Children's Society and Carers' Trust
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Implementation circular/rapid advice/letter to e.g. Ministry of Health
URL http://www.local.gov.uk/documents/10180/5756320/The+Care+Act+and+whole+family+approaches/080c323f-e6...
 
Description ESRC Knowledge Exchange co-applicants 
Organisation Open University
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The research team comprised of four academic leads: Dr Jerry Tew (Principal Investigator, University of Birmingham), Professor Sue White (University of Birmingham), Professor Kate Morris (University of Nottingham then University of Sheffield), and Professor Brid Featherstone (The Open University then University of Huddersfield). The project also employed a Research Fellow (Sarah-Jane Fenton, University of Birmingham). The research team designed, developed and hosted an ESRC Knowledge Exchange seminar series and related network events. The University of Birmingham hosted an early networking event for some of the external (non-academic) partner organisations, and one of the key Knowledge Exchange Seminar events: 05/05/2015 - Parental mental health and child welfare: 'Think Family' review meeting 15/01/2016 - Models and practices for engaging with families, relational networks and communities
Collaborator Contribution In order to maximise potential attendance at the events, and in the spirit of collaboration and partnership, the event locations rotated between the different academic institutions. The first Knowledge Exchange seminar took place at the Open University in London: 22/06/2015 - What happened to 'Think Family'? Taking stock of developments in policy and practice. The second Knowledge Exchange seminar took place at the University of Sheffield: 23/10/2015 - Family minded policy and practice: thinking differently about families, services and systems.
Impact The development of the Family Potential website: www.familypotential.org Knowledge Exchange seminars and network meeting events: April 2016 - Forthcoming event at the University of Huddersfield looking at 'Widening the circle: family focused approaches to safeguarding and support' 5/01/2016 - Models and practices for engaging with families, relational networks and communities 02/12/2015 - Parental mental health and child welfare: sharing what works from the perspective of children, parents, professionals and research (external event) 23/10/2015 - Family minded policy and practice: thinking differently about families, services and systems 22/06/2015 - What happened to 'Think Family'? Taking stock of developments in policy and practice 05/05/2015 - Parental mental health and child welfare: 'Think Family' review meeting
Start Year 2014
 
Description ESRC Knowledge Exchange co-applicants 
Organisation University of Birmingham
Department School of Social Policy
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The research team comprised of four academic leads: Dr Jerry Tew (Principal Investigator, University of Birmingham), Professor Sue White (University of Birmingham), Professor Kate Morris (University of Nottingham then University of Sheffield), and Professor Brid Featherstone (The Open University then University of Huddersfield). The project also employed a Research Fellow (Sarah-Jane Fenton, University of Birmingham). The research team designed, developed and hosted an ESRC Knowledge Exchange seminar series and related network events. The University of Birmingham hosted an early networking event for some of the external (non-academic) partner organisations, and one of the key Knowledge Exchange Seminar events: 05/05/2015 - Parental mental health and child welfare: 'Think Family' review meeting 15/01/2016 - Models and practices for engaging with families, relational networks and communities
Collaborator Contribution In order to maximise potential attendance at the events, and in the spirit of collaboration and partnership, the event locations rotated between the different academic institutions. The first Knowledge Exchange seminar took place at the Open University in London: 22/06/2015 - What happened to 'Think Family'? Taking stock of developments in policy and practice. The second Knowledge Exchange seminar took place at the University of Sheffield: 23/10/2015 - Family minded policy and practice: thinking differently about families, services and systems.
Impact The development of the Family Potential website: www.familypotential.org Knowledge Exchange seminars and network meeting events: April 2016 - Forthcoming event at the University of Huddersfield looking at 'Widening the circle: family focused approaches to safeguarding and support' 5/01/2016 - Models and practices for engaging with families, relational networks and communities 02/12/2015 - Parental mental health and child welfare: sharing what works from the perspective of children, parents, professionals and research (external event) 23/10/2015 - Family minded policy and practice: thinking differently about families, services and systems 22/06/2015 - What happened to 'Think Family'? Taking stock of developments in policy and practice 05/05/2015 - Parental mental health and child welfare: 'Think Family' review meeting
Start Year 2014
 
Description ESRC Knowledge Exchange co-applicants 
Organisation University of Huddersfield
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The research team comprised of four academic leads: Dr Jerry Tew (Principal Investigator, University of Birmingham), Professor Sue White (University of Birmingham), Professor Kate Morris (University of Nottingham then University of Sheffield), and Professor Brid Featherstone (The Open University then University of Huddersfield). The project also employed a Research Fellow (Sarah-Jane Fenton, University of Birmingham). The research team designed, developed and hosted an ESRC Knowledge Exchange seminar series and related network events. The University of Birmingham hosted an early networking event for some of the external (non-academic) partner organisations, and one of the key Knowledge Exchange Seminar events: 05/05/2015 - Parental mental health and child welfare: 'Think Family' review meeting 15/01/2016 - Models and practices for engaging with families, relational networks and communities
Collaborator Contribution In order to maximise potential attendance at the events, and in the spirit of collaboration and partnership, the event locations rotated between the different academic institutions. The first Knowledge Exchange seminar took place at the Open University in London: 22/06/2015 - What happened to 'Think Family'? Taking stock of developments in policy and practice. The second Knowledge Exchange seminar took place at the University of Sheffield: 23/10/2015 - Family minded policy and practice: thinking differently about families, services and systems.
Impact The development of the Family Potential website: www.familypotential.org Knowledge Exchange seminars and network meeting events: April 2016 - Forthcoming event at the University of Huddersfield looking at 'Widening the circle: family focused approaches to safeguarding and support' 5/01/2016 - Models and practices for engaging with families, relational networks and communities 02/12/2015 - Parental mental health and child welfare: sharing what works from the perspective of children, parents, professionals and research (external event) 23/10/2015 - Family minded policy and practice: thinking differently about families, services and systems 22/06/2015 - What happened to 'Think Family'? Taking stock of developments in policy and practice 05/05/2015 - Parental mental health and child welfare: 'Think Family' review meeting
Start Year 2014
 
Description ESRC Knowledge Exchange co-applicants 
Organisation University of Nottingham
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The research team comprised of four academic leads: Dr Jerry Tew (Principal Investigator, University of Birmingham), Professor Sue White (University of Birmingham), Professor Kate Morris (University of Nottingham then University of Sheffield), and Professor Brid Featherstone (The Open University then University of Huddersfield). The project also employed a Research Fellow (Sarah-Jane Fenton, University of Birmingham). The research team designed, developed and hosted an ESRC Knowledge Exchange seminar series and related network events. The University of Birmingham hosted an early networking event for some of the external (non-academic) partner organisations, and one of the key Knowledge Exchange Seminar events: 05/05/2015 - Parental mental health and child welfare: 'Think Family' review meeting 15/01/2016 - Models and practices for engaging with families, relational networks and communities
Collaborator Contribution In order to maximise potential attendance at the events, and in the spirit of collaboration and partnership, the event locations rotated between the different academic institutions. The first Knowledge Exchange seminar took place at the Open University in London: 22/06/2015 - What happened to 'Think Family'? Taking stock of developments in policy and practice. The second Knowledge Exchange seminar took place at the University of Sheffield: 23/10/2015 - Family minded policy and practice: thinking differently about families, services and systems.
Impact The development of the Family Potential website: www.familypotential.org Knowledge Exchange seminars and network meeting events: April 2016 - Forthcoming event at the University of Huddersfield looking at 'Widening the circle: family focused approaches to safeguarding and support' 5/01/2016 - Models and practices for engaging with families, relational networks and communities 02/12/2015 - Parental mental health and child welfare: sharing what works from the perspective of children, parents, professionals and research (external event) 23/10/2015 - Family minded policy and practice: thinking differently about families, services and systems 22/06/2015 - What happened to 'Think Family'? Taking stock of developments in policy and practice 05/05/2015 - Parental mental health and child welfare: 'Think Family' review meeting
Start Year 2014
 
Description ESRC Knowledge Exchange co-applicants 
Organisation University of Sheffield
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The research team comprised of four academic leads: Dr Jerry Tew (Principal Investigator, University of Birmingham), Professor Sue White (University of Birmingham), Professor Kate Morris (University of Nottingham then University of Sheffield), and Professor Brid Featherstone (The Open University then University of Huddersfield). The project also employed a Research Fellow (Sarah-Jane Fenton, University of Birmingham). The research team designed, developed and hosted an ESRC Knowledge Exchange seminar series and related network events. The University of Birmingham hosted an early networking event for some of the external (non-academic) partner organisations, and one of the key Knowledge Exchange Seminar events: 05/05/2015 - Parental mental health and child welfare: 'Think Family' review meeting 15/01/2016 - Models and practices for engaging with families, relational networks and communities
Collaborator Contribution In order to maximise potential attendance at the events, and in the spirit of collaboration and partnership, the event locations rotated between the different academic institutions. The first Knowledge Exchange seminar took place at the Open University in London: 22/06/2015 - What happened to 'Think Family'? Taking stock of developments in policy and practice. The second Knowledge Exchange seminar took place at the University of Sheffield: 23/10/2015 - Family minded policy and practice: thinking differently about families, services and systems.
Impact The development of the Family Potential website: www.familypotential.org Knowledge Exchange seminars and network meeting events: April 2016 - Forthcoming event at the University of Huddersfield looking at 'Widening the circle: family focused approaches to safeguarding and support' 5/01/2016 - Models and practices for engaging with families, relational networks and communities 02/12/2015 - Parental mental health and child welfare: sharing what works from the perspective of children, parents, professionals and research (external event) 23/10/2015 - Family minded policy and practice: thinking differently about families, services and systems 22/06/2015 - What happened to 'Think Family'? Taking stock of developments in policy and practice 05/05/2015 - Parental mental health and child welfare: 'Think Family' review meeting
Start Year 2014
 
Description Project partner organisations 
Organisation 2Gether NHS Foundation Trust
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Through the ESRC Knowledge Exchange seminar series, project partners were involved in presenting their work around innovative areas of practice or work with families. Project partners attended and participated in seminars, network events and discussions. Project partners also engaged in developing resources and sharing work through the website.
Collaborator Contribution There were a wide range of speakers at the three key ESRC Knowledge Exchange seminar events, some of whom were drawn from the partner organisations directly and others who were recommended through the wider network of interest that developed around the seminar series. These presentations included speakers from: ESRC Seminar 1: What happened to 'Think Family'? - After Think Family - Kate Morris, University of Birmingham - After Think Family - Jerry Tew, University of Birmingham - Perspectives from the field - West Berkshire Council - Perspectives from the field - Morning Lane Associates - Perspectives from the field - Cardiff University - Developing family minded practices - Barnardo's Action with Young Carers, Liverpool - Perspectives from the field - BIG Manchester / Big Lottery Improving Futures programme ESRC Seminar 2: What happened to 'Think Family'? - Whakapapa, whanau - relational identity in care and protection - Maori Advisor, Ministry of Social Development, New Zealand Government - Supporting family minded approaches: changing systems, changing practices, changing cultures Paul Nixon Chief Social Worker, New Zealand - Family experiences of services - a charter for change Family Rights Group and family members of 'Your Family Your Voice' Alliance - The wrong answer to the wrong question: the limits to our research seeking to understand family minded models Emeritus Professor Gale Burford, Vermont University USA. ESRC Seminar 3: Innovative models and practices for engaging with families and relational networks - Taking the Agenda Forward - What do FGCs do? Participation, planning and action in adults' and children's services -Family Group Conference Service, Camden Social Services - FGCs and establishing family-inclusive ways of working in Leeds - Kate Morris, University of Sheffield - Sharing Decision-making, engagement and capacity building: how do we assess the FGC model? Pete Marsh, University of Sheffield - Co-production, community and safeguarding - Love Barrow Families - Treatment principles and how they work - Mark Hopfenbeck, Norwegian University of Science and Technology - Doing dialogue: a family perspective - Family member and carer perspective - Doing dialogue: a practitioner perspective - Kent County Council / Kent and Medway NHS and Social Care Partnership Trust
Impact To date there have been three ESRC seminar events; a network meeting; and there is a further seminar planned in April 2016: 15/01/2016 - Models and practices for engaging with families, relational networks and communities 23/10/2015 - Family minded policy and practice: thinking differently about families, services and systems 22/06/2015 - What happened to 'Think Family'? Taking stock of developments in policy and practice 05/05/2015 - Parental mental health and child welfare: 'Think Family' review meeting In addition there is an active website including a blog: www.familypotential.org
Start Year 2014
 
Description Project partner organisations 
Organisation Big Lottery Fund
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Through the ESRC Knowledge Exchange seminar series, project partners were involved in presenting their work around innovative areas of practice or work with families. Project partners attended and participated in seminars, network events and discussions. Project partners also engaged in developing resources and sharing work through the website.
Collaborator Contribution There were a wide range of speakers at the three key ESRC Knowledge Exchange seminar events, some of whom were drawn from the partner organisations directly and others who were recommended through the wider network of interest that developed around the seminar series. These presentations included speakers from: ESRC Seminar 1: What happened to 'Think Family'? - After Think Family - Kate Morris, University of Birmingham - After Think Family - Jerry Tew, University of Birmingham - Perspectives from the field - West Berkshire Council - Perspectives from the field - Morning Lane Associates - Perspectives from the field - Cardiff University - Developing family minded practices - Barnardo's Action with Young Carers, Liverpool - Perspectives from the field - BIG Manchester / Big Lottery Improving Futures programme ESRC Seminar 2: What happened to 'Think Family'? - Whakapapa, whanau - relational identity in care and protection - Maori Advisor, Ministry of Social Development, New Zealand Government - Supporting family minded approaches: changing systems, changing practices, changing cultures Paul Nixon Chief Social Worker, New Zealand - Family experiences of services - a charter for change Family Rights Group and family members of 'Your Family Your Voice' Alliance - The wrong answer to the wrong question: the limits to our research seeking to understand family minded models Emeritus Professor Gale Burford, Vermont University USA. ESRC Seminar 3: Innovative models and practices for engaging with families and relational networks - Taking the Agenda Forward - What do FGCs do? Participation, planning and action in adults' and children's services -Family Group Conference Service, Camden Social Services - FGCs and establishing family-inclusive ways of working in Leeds - Kate Morris, University of Sheffield - Sharing Decision-making, engagement and capacity building: how do we assess the FGC model? Pete Marsh, University of Sheffield - Co-production, community and safeguarding - Love Barrow Families - Treatment principles and how they work - Mark Hopfenbeck, Norwegian University of Science and Technology - Doing dialogue: a family perspective - Family member and carer perspective - Doing dialogue: a practitioner perspective - Kent County Council / Kent and Medway NHS and Social Care Partnership Trust
Impact To date there have been three ESRC seminar events; a network meeting; and there is a further seminar planned in April 2016: 15/01/2016 - Models and practices for engaging with families, relational networks and communities 23/10/2015 - Family minded policy and practice: thinking differently about families, services and systems 22/06/2015 - What happened to 'Think Family'? Taking stock of developments in policy and practice 05/05/2015 - Parental mental health and child welfare: 'Think Family' review meeting In addition there is an active website including a blog: www.familypotential.org
Start Year 2014
 
Description Project partner organisations 
Organisation Birmingham City Council
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Through the ESRC Knowledge Exchange seminar series, project partners were involved in presenting their work around innovative areas of practice or work with families. Project partners attended and participated in seminars, network events and discussions. Project partners also engaged in developing resources and sharing work through the website.
Collaborator Contribution There were a wide range of speakers at the three key ESRC Knowledge Exchange seminar events, some of whom were drawn from the partner organisations directly and others who were recommended through the wider network of interest that developed around the seminar series. These presentations included speakers from: ESRC Seminar 1: What happened to 'Think Family'? - After Think Family - Kate Morris, University of Birmingham - After Think Family - Jerry Tew, University of Birmingham - Perspectives from the field - West Berkshire Council - Perspectives from the field - Morning Lane Associates - Perspectives from the field - Cardiff University - Developing family minded practices - Barnardo's Action with Young Carers, Liverpool - Perspectives from the field - BIG Manchester / Big Lottery Improving Futures programme ESRC Seminar 2: What happened to 'Think Family'? - Whakapapa, whanau - relational identity in care and protection - Maori Advisor, Ministry of Social Development, New Zealand Government - Supporting family minded approaches: changing systems, changing practices, changing cultures Paul Nixon Chief Social Worker, New Zealand - Family experiences of services - a charter for change Family Rights Group and family members of 'Your Family Your Voice' Alliance - The wrong answer to the wrong question: the limits to our research seeking to understand family minded models Emeritus Professor Gale Burford, Vermont University USA. ESRC Seminar 3: Innovative models and practices for engaging with families and relational networks - Taking the Agenda Forward - What do FGCs do? Participation, planning and action in adults' and children's services -Family Group Conference Service, Camden Social Services - FGCs and establishing family-inclusive ways of working in Leeds - Kate Morris, University of Sheffield - Sharing Decision-making, engagement and capacity building: how do we assess the FGC model? Pete Marsh, University of Sheffield - Co-production, community and safeguarding - Love Barrow Families - Treatment principles and how they work - Mark Hopfenbeck, Norwegian University of Science and Technology - Doing dialogue: a family perspective - Family member and carer perspective - Doing dialogue: a practitioner perspective - Kent County Council / Kent and Medway NHS and Social Care Partnership Trust
Impact To date there have been three ESRC seminar events; a network meeting; and there is a further seminar planned in April 2016: 15/01/2016 - Models and practices for engaging with families, relational networks and communities 23/10/2015 - Family minded policy and practice: thinking differently about families, services and systems 22/06/2015 - What happened to 'Think Family'? Taking stock of developments in policy and practice 05/05/2015 - Parental mental health and child welfare: 'Think Family' review meeting In addition there is an active website including a blog: www.familypotential.org
Start Year 2014
 
Description Project partner organisations 
Organisation Family Rights Group
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Through the ESRC Knowledge Exchange seminar series, project partners were involved in presenting their work around innovative areas of practice or work with families. Project partners attended and participated in seminars, network events and discussions. Project partners also engaged in developing resources and sharing work through the website.
Collaborator Contribution There were a wide range of speakers at the three key ESRC Knowledge Exchange seminar events, some of whom were drawn from the partner organisations directly and others who were recommended through the wider network of interest that developed around the seminar series. These presentations included speakers from: ESRC Seminar 1: What happened to 'Think Family'? - After Think Family - Kate Morris, University of Birmingham - After Think Family - Jerry Tew, University of Birmingham - Perspectives from the field - West Berkshire Council - Perspectives from the field - Morning Lane Associates - Perspectives from the field - Cardiff University - Developing family minded practices - Barnardo's Action with Young Carers, Liverpool - Perspectives from the field - BIG Manchester / Big Lottery Improving Futures programme ESRC Seminar 2: What happened to 'Think Family'? - Whakapapa, whanau - relational identity in care and protection - Maori Advisor, Ministry of Social Development, New Zealand Government - Supporting family minded approaches: changing systems, changing practices, changing cultures Paul Nixon Chief Social Worker, New Zealand - Family experiences of services - a charter for change Family Rights Group and family members of 'Your Family Your Voice' Alliance - The wrong answer to the wrong question: the limits to our research seeking to understand family minded models Emeritus Professor Gale Burford, Vermont University USA. ESRC Seminar 3: Innovative models and practices for engaging with families and relational networks - Taking the Agenda Forward - What do FGCs do? Participation, planning and action in adults' and children's services -Family Group Conference Service, Camden Social Services - FGCs and establishing family-inclusive ways of working in Leeds - Kate Morris, University of Sheffield - Sharing Decision-making, engagement and capacity building: how do we assess the FGC model? Pete Marsh, University of Sheffield - Co-production, community and safeguarding - Love Barrow Families - Treatment principles and how they work - Mark Hopfenbeck, Norwegian University of Science and Technology - Doing dialogue: a family perspective - Family member and carer perspective - Doing dialogue: a practitioner perspective - Kent County Council / Kent and Medway NHS and Social Care Partnership Trust
Impact To date there have been three ESRC seminar events; a network meeting; and there is a further seminar planned in April 2016: 15/01/2016 - Models and practices for engaging with families, relational networks and communities 23/10/2015 - Family minded policy and practice: thinking differently about families, services and systems 22/06/2015 - What happened to 'Think Family'? Taking stock of developments in policy and practice 05/05/2015 - Parental mental health and child welfare: 'Think Family' review meeting In addition there is an active website including a blog: www.familypotential.org
Start Year 2014
 
Description Project partner organisations 
Organisation Gloucestershire County Council
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Through the ESRC Knowledge Exchange seminar series, project partners were involved in presenting their work around innovative areas of practice or work with families. Project partners attended and participated in seminars, network events and discussions. Project partners also engaged in developing resources and sharing work through the website.
Collaborator Contribution There were a wide range of speakers at the three key ESRC Knowledge Exchange seminar events, some of whom were drawn from the partner organisations directly and others who were recommended through the wider network of interest that developed around the seminar series. These presentations included speakers from: ESRC Seminar 1: What happened to 'Think Family'? - After Think Family - Kate Morris, University of Birmingham - After Think Family - Jerry Tew, University of Birmingham - Perspectives from the field - West Berkshire Council - Perspectives from the field - Morning Lane Associates - Perspectives from the field - Cardiff University - Developing family minded practices - Barnardo's Action with Young Carers, Liverpool - Perspectives from the field - BIG Manchester / Big Lottery Improving Futures programme ESRC Seminar 2: What happened to 'Think Family'? - Whakapapa, whanau - relational identity in care and protection - Maori Advisor, Ministry of Social Development, New Zealand Government - Supporting family minded approaches: changing systems, changing practices, changing cultures Paul Nixon Chief Social Worker, New Zealand - Family experiences of services - a charter for change Family Rights Group and family members of 'Your Family Your Voice' Alliance - The wrong answer to the wrong question: the limits to our research seeking to understand family minded models Emeritus Professor Gale Burford, Vermont University USA. ESRC Seminar 3: Innovative models and practices for engaging with families and relational networks - Taking the Agenda Forward - What do FGCs do? Participation, planning and action in adults' and children's services -Family Group Conference Service, Camden Social Services - FGCs and establishing family-inclusive ways of working in Leeds - Kate Morris, University of Sheffield - Sharing Decision-making, engagement and capacity building: how do we assess the FGC model? Pete Marsh, University of Sheffield - Co-production, community and safeguarding - Love Barrow Families - Treatment principles and how they work - Mark Hopfenbeck, Norwegian University of Science and Technology - Doing dialogue: a family perspective - Family member and carer perspective - Doing dialogue: a practitioner perspective - Kent County Council / Kent and Medway NHS and Social Care Partnership Trust
Impact To date there have been three ESRC seminar events; a network meeting; and there is a further seminar planned in April 2016: 15/01/2016 - Models and practices for engaging with families, relational networks and communities 23/10/2015 - Family minded policy and practice: thinking differently about families, services and systems 22/06/2015 - What happened to 'Think Family'? Taking stock of developments in policy and practice 05/05/2015 - Parental mental health and child welfare: 'Think Family' review meeting In addition there is an active website including a blog: www.familypotential.org
Start Year 2014
 
Description Project partner organisations 
Organisation NHS Liverpool Clinical Commissioning Group
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Through the ESRC Knowledge Exchange seminar series, project partners were involved in presenting their work around innovative areas of practice or work with families. Project partners attended and participated in seminars, network events and discussions. Project partners also engaged in developing resources and sharing work through the website.
Collaborator Contribution There were a wide range of speakers at the three key ESRC Knowledge Exchange seminar events, some of whom were drawn from the partner organisations directly and others who were recommended through the wider network of interest that developed around the seminar series. These presentations included speakers from: ESRC Seminar 1: What happened to 'Think Family'? - After Think Family - Kate Morris, University of Birmingham - After Think Family - Jerry Tew, University of Birmingham - Perspectives from the field - West Berkshire Council - Perspectives from the field - Morning Lane Associates - Perspectives from the field - Cardiff University - Developing family minded practices - Barnardo's Action with Young Carers, Liverpool - Perspectives from the field - BIG Manchester / Big Lottery Improving Futures programme ESRC Seminar 2: What happened to 'Think Family'? - Whakapapa, whanau - relational identity in care and protection - Maori Advisor, Ministry of Social Development, New Zealand Government - Supporting family minded approaches: changing systems, changing practices, changing cultures Paul Nixon Chief Social Worker, New Zealand - Family experiences of services - a charter for change Family Rights Group and family members of 'Your Family Your Voice' Alliance - The wrong answer to the wrong question: the limits to our research seeking to understand family minded models Emeritus Professor Gale Burford, Vermont University USA. ESRC Seminar 3: Innovative models and practices for engaging with families and relational networks - Taking the Agenda Forward - What do FGCs do? Participation, planning and action in adults' and children's services -Family Group Conference Service, Camden Social Services - FGCs and establishing family-inclusive ways of working in Leeds - Kate Morris, University of Sheffield - Sharing Decision-making, engagement and capacity building: how do we assess the FGC model? Pete Marsh, University of Sheffield - Co-production, community and safeguarding - Love Barrow Families - Treatment principles and how they work - Mark Hopfenbeck, Norwegian University of Science and Technology - Doing dialogue: a family perspective - Family member and carer perspective - Doing dialogue: a practitioner perspective - Kent County Council / Kent and Medway NHS and Social Care Partnership Trust
Impact To date there have been three ESRC seminar events; a network meeting; and there is a further seminar planned in April 2016: 15/01/2016 - Models and practices for engaging with families, relational networks and communities 23/10/2015 - Family minded policy and practice: thinking differently about families, services and systems 22/06/2015 - What happened to 'Think Family'? Taking stock of developments in policy and practice 05/05/2015 - Parental mental health and child welfare: 'Think Family' review meeting In addition there is an active website including a blog: www.familypotential.org
Start Year 2014
 
Description Project partner organisations 
Organisation Nottingham City Council
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Through the ESRC Knowledge Exchange seminar series, project partners were involved in presenting their work around innovative areas of practice or work with families. Project partners attended and participated in seminars, network events and discussions. Project partners also engaged in developing resources and sharing work through the website.
Collaborator Contribution There were a wide range of speakers at the three key ESRC Knowledge Exchange seminar events, some of whom were drawn from the partner organisations directly and others who were recommended through the wider network of interest that developed around the seminar series. These presentations included speakers from: ESRC Seminar 1: What happened to 'Think Family'? - After Think Family - Kate Morris, University of Birmingham - After Think Family - Jerry Tew, University of Birmingham - Perspectives from the field - West Berkshire Council - Perspectives from the field - Morning Lane Associates - Perspectives from the field - Cardiff University - Developing family minded practices - Barnardo's Action with Young Carers, Liverpool - Perspectives from the field - BIG Manchester / Big Lottery Improving Futures programme ESRC Seminar 2: What happened to 'Think Family'? - Whakapapa, whanau - relational identity in care and protection - Maori Advisor, Ministry of Social Development, New Zealand Government - Supporting family minded approaches: changing systems, changing practices, changing cultures Paul Nixon Chief Social Worker, New Zealand - Family experiences of services - a charter for change Family Rights Group and family members of 'Your Family Your Voice' Alliance - The wrong answer to the wrong question: the limits to our research seeking to understand family minded models Emeritus Professor Gale Burford, Vermont University USA. ESRC Seminar 3: Innovative models and practices for engaging with families and relational networks - Taking the Agenda Forward - What do FGCs do? Participation, planning and action in adults' and children's services -Family Group Conference Service, Camden Social Services - FGCs and establishing family-inclusive ways of working in Leeds - Kate Morris, University of Sheffield - Sharing Decision-making, engagement and capacity building: how do we assess the FGC model? Pete Marsh, University of Sheffield - Co-production, community and safeguarding - Love Barrow Families - Treatment principles and how they work - Mark Hopfenbeck, Norwegian University of Science and Technology - Doing dialogue: a family perspective - Family member and carer perspective - Doing dialogue: a practitioner perspective - Kent County Council / Kent and Medway NHS and Social Care Partnership Trust
Impact To date there have been three ESRC seminar events; a network meeting; and there is a further seminar planned in April 2016: 15/01/2016 - Models and practices for engaging with families, relational networks and communities 23/10/2015 - Family minded policy and practice: thinking differently about families, services and systems 22/06/2015 - What happened to 'Think Family'? Taking stock of developments in policy and practice 05/05/2015 - Parental mental health and child welfare: 'Think Family' review meeting In addition there is an active website including a blog: www.familypotential.org
Start Year 2014
 
Description Project partner organisations 
Organisation Somerset Partnership NHS Foundation Trust
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Through the ESRC Knowledge Exchange seminar series, project partners were involved in presenting their work around innovative areas of practice or work with families. Project partners attended and participated in seminars, network events and discussions. Project partners also engaged in developing resources and sharing work through the website.
Collaborator Contribution There were a wide range of speakers at the three key ESRC Knowledge Exchange seminar events, some of whom were drawn from the partner organisations directly and others who were recommended through the wider network of interest that developed around the seminar series. These presentations included speakers from: ESRC Seminar 1: What happened to 'Think Family'? - After Think Family - Kate Morris, University of Birmingham - After Think Family - Jerry Tew, University of Birmingham - Perspectives from the field - West Berkshire Council - Perspectives from the field - Morning Lane Associates - Perspectives from the field - Cardiff University - Developing family minded practices - Barnardo's Action with Young Carers, Liverpool - Perspectives from the field - BIG Manchester / Big Lottery Improving Futures programme ESRC Seminar 2: What happened to 'Think Family'? - Whakapapa, whanau - relational identity in care and protection - Maori Advisor, Ministry of Social Development, New Zealand Government - Supporting family minded approaches: changing systems, changing practices, changing cultures Paul Nixon Chief Social Worker, New Zealand - Family experiences of services - a charter for change Family Rights Group and family members of 'Your Family Your Voice' Alliance - The wrong answer to the wrong question: the limits to our research seeking to understand family minded models Emeritus Professor Gale Burford, Vermont University USA. ESRC Seminar 3: Innovative models and practices for engaging with families and relational networks - Taking the Agenda Forward - What do FGCs do? Participation, planning and action in adults' and children's services -Family Group Conference Service, Camden Social Services - FGCs and establishing family-inclusive ways of working in Leeds - Kate Morris, University of Sheffield - Sharing Decision-making, engagement and capacity building: how do we assess the FGC model? Pete Marsh, University of Sheffield - Co-production, community and safeguarding - Love Barrow Families - Treatment principles and how they work - Mark Hopfenbeck, Norwegian University of Science and Technology - Doing dialogue: a family perspective - Family member and carer perspective - Doing dialogue: a practitioner perspective - Kent County Council / Kent and Medway NHS and Social Care Partnership Trust
Impact To date there have been three ESRC seminar events; a network meeting; and there is a further seminar planned in April 2016: 15/01/2016 - Models and practices for engaging with families, relational networks and communities 23/10/2015 - Family minded policy and practice: thinking differently about families, services and systems 22/06/2015 - What happened to 'Think Family'? Taking stock of developments in policy and practice 05/05/2015 - Parental mental health and child welfare: 'Think Family' review meeting In addition there is an active website including a blog: www.familypotential.org
Start Year 2014
 
Description Project partner organisations 
Organisation South London and Maudsley (SLAM) NHS Foundation Trust
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Through the ESRC Knowledge Exchange seminar series, project partners were involved in presenting their work around innovative areas of practice or work with families. Project partners attended and participated in seminars, network events and discussions. Project partners also engaged in developing resources and sharing work through the website.
Collaborator Contribution There were a wide range of speakers at the three key ESRC Knowledge Exchange seminar events, some of whom were drawn from the partner organisations directly and others who were recommended through the wider network of interest that developed around the seminar series. These presentations included speakers from: ESRC Seminar 1: What happened to 'Think Family'? - After Think Family - Kate Morris, University of Birmingham - After Think Family - Jerry Tew, University of Birmingham - Perspectives from the field - West Berkshire Council - Perspectives from the field - Morning Lane Associates - Perspectives from the field - Cardiff University - Developing family minded practices - Barnardo's Action with Young Carers, Liverpool - Perspectives from the field - BIG Manchester / Big Lottery Improving Futures programme ESRC Seminar 2: What happened to 'Think Family'? - Whakapapa, whanau - relational identity in care and protection - Maori Advisor, Ministry of Social Development, New Zealand Government - Supporting family minded approaches: changing systems, changing practices, changing cultures Paul Nixon Chief Social Worker, New Zealand - Family experiences of services - a charter for change Family Rights Group and family members of 'Your Family Your Voice' Alliance - The wrong answer to the wrong question: the limits to our research seeking to understand family minded models Emeritus Professor Gale Burford, Vermont University USA. ESRC Seminar 3: Innovative models and practices for engaging with families and relational networks - Taking the Agenda Forward - What do FGCs do? Participation, planning and action in adults' and children's services -Family Group Conference Service, Camden Social Services - FGCs and establishing family-inclusive ways of working in Leeds - Kate Morris, University of Sheffield - Sharing Decision-making, engagement and capacity building: how do we assess the FGC model? Pete Marsh, University of Sheffield - Co-production, community and safeguarding - Love Barrow Families - Treatment principles and how they work - Mark Hopfenbeck, Norwegian University of Science and Technology - Doing dialogue: a family perspective - Family member and carer perspective - Doing dialogue: a practitioner perspective - Kent County Council / Kent and Medway NHS and Social Care Partnership Trust
Impact To date there have been three ESRC seminar events; a network meeting; and there is a further seminar planned in April 2016: 15/01/2016 - Models and practices for engaging with families, relational networks and communities 23/10/2015 - Family minded policy and practice: thinking differently about families, services and systems 22/06/2015 - What happened to 'Think Family'? Taking stock of developments in policy and practice 05/05/2015 - Parental mental health and child welfare: 'Think Family' review meeting In addition there is an active website including a blog: www.familypotential.org
Start Year 2014
 
Description Project partner organisations 
Organisation The Carers Trust
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Through the ESRC Knowledge Exchange seminar series, project partners were involved in presenting their work around innovative areas of practice or work with families. Project partners attended and participated in seminars, network events and discussions. Project partners also engaged in developing resources and sharing work through the website.
Collaborator Contribution There were a wide range of speakers at the three key ESRC Knowledge Exchange seminar events, some of whom were drawn from the partner organisations directly and others who were recommended through the wider network of interest that developed around the seminar series. These presentations included speakers from: ESRC Seminar 1: What happened to 'Think Family'? - After Think Family - Kate Morris, University of Birmingham - After Think Family - Jerry Tew, University of Birmingham - Perspectives from the field - West Berkshire Council - Perspectives from the field - Morning Lane Associates - Perspectives from the field - Cardiff University - Developing family minded practices - Barnardo's Action with Young Carers, Liverpool - Perspectives from the field - BIG Manchester / Big Lottery Improving Futures programme ESRC Seminar 2: What happened to 'Think Family'? - Whakapapa, whanau - relational identity in care and protection - Maori Advisor, Ministry of Social Development, New Zealand Government - Supporting family minded approaches: changing systems, changing practices, changing cultures Paul Nixon Chief Social Worker, New Zealand - Family experiences of services - a charter for change Family Rights Group and family members of 'Your Family Your Voice' Alliance - The wrong answer to the wrong question: the limits to our research seeking to understand family minded models Emeritus Professor Gale Burford, Vermont University USA. ESRC Seminar 3: Innovative models and practices for engaging with families and relational networks - Taking the Agenda Forward - What do FGCs do? Participation, planning and action in adults' and children's services -Family Group Conference Service, Camden Social Services - FGCs and establishing family-inclusive ways of working in Leeds - Kate Morris, University of Sheffield - Sharing Decision-making, engagement and capacity building: how do we assess the FGC model? Pete Marsh, University of Sheffield - Co-production, community and safeguarding - Love Barrow Families - Treatment principles and how they work - Mark Hopfenbeck, Norwegian University of Science and Technology - Doing dialogue: a family perspective - Family member and carer perspective - Doing dialogue: a practitioner perspective - Kent County Council / Kent and Medway NHS and Social Care Partnership Trust
Impact To date there have been three ESRC seminar events; a network meeting; and there is a further seminar planned in April 2016: 15/01/2016 - Models and practices for engaging with families, relational networks and communities 23/10/2015 - Family minded policy and practice: thinking differently about families, services and systems 22/06/2015 - What happened to 'Think Family'? Taking stock of developments in policy and practice 05/05/2015 - Parental mental health and child welfare: 'Think Family' review meeting In addition there is an active website including a blog: www.familypotential.org
Start Year 2014
 
Title Family Potential website 
Description In order to communicate with a diverse range of stakeholders effectively; to ensure communication about events (both internal and external) in a timely manner; as well as individual e-mails and maintaining a database of key contacts, a website was developed as part of the Knowledge Exchange activities. The Family Potential website was designed as a place where people could share their organisation's innovative practice with families; get contact details for other organisations who may be working in similarly challenging environments; and find resources and academic materials relating to whole-family approaches. The website also serves as a dissemination platform for any academic grants being facilitated by or affiliated with the Family Potential research centre. The website is also linked to a twitter account created for the Knowledge Exchange, that was used to communicate with network members about events that were upcoming or had recently taken place. This was useful for reaching audiences related to the ESRC Knowledge Exchange seminar series and for communicating information around those events. 
Type Of Technology Webtool/Application 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact Individuals in the network reported having it useful to both share the work that they were doing, and to see what others were doing and this facilitated discussion about whole-family approaches in practice. Organisations affiliated with the Family Potential Research Centre also found it a useful way of integrating academic research and front-line practice, and as a place to go and find information. From the start of the Knowledge Exchange, the website has received over 4000 page views. 
URL http://www.familypotential.org
 
Description 02/02/2016 - Open Dialogue UK conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presentation at the Open Dialogue UK conference on the theme: "Towards Openness and Democracy in Mental Health services - Open Dialogue and related approaches in the UK and internationally". The theme of this conference linked to Seminar 3 of Knowledge Exchange (which had provided an introduction to Open Dialogue) and comprised presentations and panel responses from Finland, Germany, USA and UK on research and practice in relation to dialogical approaches with family and relational networks. Dr Tew and two of the presenters at Seminar 3 participated in the Conference.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description 02/12/2015 - Parental mental health and child welfare conference (external event) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Dr Tew gave a presentation at 'Parental mental health and child welfare conference: sharing what works from the perspective of children, parents, professionals and research' (external event). This event was an external event to the Family Potential research centre ESRC Knowledge Exchange events, but had a core common participants who were linked to other aspects of the Knowledge Exchange network.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description 05/05/2015 - Parental mental health and child welfare: 'Think Family' review meeting 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Parental mental health and child welfare - 'Think Family' review meeting: A meeting took place of 15 professionals drawn from across England and one participant from Northern Ireland. The meeting took place at the University of Birmingham with the aim of discussing the shape and scope for the upcoming ESRC seminar series in order to ensure that it spoke to as broad a range of relevant audience members as possible. Discussion took place in order to glean a more textured understanding of what would be most useful and relevant for practitioners from a range of organisations across the public and third sectors. The meeting drew some participants from an existing parental mental health and child welfare network, in order to inform the understanding of the particular issues in families where there was parental mental illness. The outcome of the meeting was informative suggestions for the upcoming program of seminars including the individuals nominating organisations (both present and not present) to be approached to participate in Knowledge Exchange activities, and to potentially speak at the seminars. This early meeting facilitated drawing together several existing but dormant networks to reinvigorate them and to look at whole-family approaches across health and social care. The meeting also helped to identify organisations and individuals who had case study material that might be usefully shared on the Family Potential website, or those who might wish to contribute articles to the Pavilion annual publication: Parental mental health and child welfare work: volume 1.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description 11/02/16 - Masterclass for South Yorkshire Teaching Partnership on Families, mental health and whole family approaches 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Dr Tew hosted a 'Masterclass' for South Yorkshire Teaching Partnership on Families, Mental Health and Whole Family Approaches with a mixed group of social work practitioners and students.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description 12/11/2015 - Presentation at Family Group Conferencing Practice Network meeting. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Dr Tew gave a presentation on Family minded practice and family group conferencing in adult services and mental health and discussion at Family Group Conferencing Practice Network meeting. The group comprised FGC leads from around 15 Local Authorities form across England and Scotland. The presentation asked the question about whether Family Group Conferencing actually achieved outcomes that went beyond facilitating family decision making - and presented findings from Dr Tew's SSCR funded research on whole family approaches to reablement in mental health, which indicated that this could be the case.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description 15/01/2016 - Models and practices for engaging with families, relational networks and communities 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Models and practices for engaging with families, relational networks and communities: This was the third in a series of Knowledge Exchange seminars. This seminar focused on exploring approaches that are genuinely democratic in terms of sharing power with (and within) family and social networks. This can involve both a relentless search for the potentials and capabilities within relational networks, and also a recognition that these may also be the site of past (or current) trauma or abuse, or failure to recognize, protect or support individuals within them. The Seminar offered a mix of theoretical and practice focused discussions and featured current developments including: Family Group Conferencing and its application in children's and adults' settings; Open Dialogue - a radical relationally focused approach in mental health; Community and asset-based approaches to enabling families in adversity.

The seminar was held at the University of Birmingham and drew participants from across health and social care, but particularly those with an interest in family group conferencing and Open Dialogue methods. There was a lively debate about the synergies, differences, and parallels between the approaches presented, and discussion about what the approaches were trying to achieve within a whole-family paradigm. The day was facilitated and co-chaired by a service user and family member, and had a particularly moving presentation from the family member of a young man whom had been in mental health services prior to his suicide. The day was a fantastic synergy between lived experience, policy, practice and academic research. Drawing these strands together was reported by those attending the event as inspiring and gave people lots of material to discuss when they returned to their practice settings. There were several requests for the presentations to be made available on the website, which has been done, so that these could be shared with colleagues.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.familypotential.org/?page_id=29
 
Description 19/02/16 - Promoting Humane Social Work With Families: Listening to and Learning From Each Other 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This conference is the result of a unique collaboration between The British Association of Social Workers (BASW), Making Research Count (MRC) and the three Faculties (Children and Families, Mental Health and Adults) of the former College of Social Work. It offers an opportunity to hear from those who use, research and work in services with families across contemporary service divides. It aimed to: Share ideas from research and practice on how we can work together to support services and practices that are experienced as humane by all involved; Learn from successful examples of system reform such as that undertaken in New York, where parent advocacy became a recognised and valued aspect of provision; Hear from families with histories of hurt and trauma about how services can make a difference. Professor Brigid Featherstone and Professor Sue White presented at this event to a range of stakeholders and professionals.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description 22/06/2015 - What happened to 'Think Family'? Taking stock of developments in policy and practice 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact What happened to 'Think Family'? Taking stock of developments in policy and practice: This was the first in a series of Knowledge Exchange seminars. The seminar looked at what had happened to the 'Think Family' policy agenda, and focused on sharing experience from practice. The seminar asked what we can learn from this practice with families, and what may be interesting areas for further research and development. Contributions were made by: Professor Kate Morris (University of Nottingham), Dr Jerry Tew (University of Birmingham), Professor Andrew Pithouse (Cardiff University), Rachael Wardell (Berkshire County Council), Stephen Goodman (Morning Lane Associates), Deirdre Lewis (BIG Manchester/Improving Futures) and from young carers' initiatives.

The seminar was hosted by the Open University in London and had 35 delegates drawn from private, public and third sector organisations involved in delivering direct front-line services to families. The seminar drew delegates from across health and social care sectors, and was attended by the Chief Social Worker for Adults. The event inspired one of the speakers to write a blog post, and inspired twitter conversation about some of the themes being pulled out from the day.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.familypotential.org/?page_id=29
 
Description 23/10/2015 - Family minded policy and practice: thinking differently about families, services and systems 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Family minded policy and practice: thinking differently about families, services and systems: This was the second in a series of Knowledge Exchange seminars. This seminar focused on how services and systems consider families and work to engage them in different contexts. The seminar further inlcuded discussion of: caring, resilience and wellbeing, community perspectives and restorative practice. Contributions were made by: Paul Nixon (Chief Social Worker, New Zealand); family members from 'Your Family Your Voice'; Moana Eruera (Maori Advisor, New Zealand Government); and Professor Gale Burford (Emeritus Professor, University of Vermont and leading FGC researcher).

This Knowledge Exchange event was hosted for over 50 people at the University of Sheffield. The event offered the opportunity for international comparison to be made and discussion to be had about working with families whole face complex challenges. The discussion also looked at comparing family group conference work in the UK, New Zealand, Canada and the US and presenters drew on a range of practice examples from these different contexts. Lively debate ensued and participants reported being inspired to take learning and ideas from the day back to their practice settings.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.familypotential.org/?page_id=29
 
Description Invisible Fathers Dissemination Event 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This event reported on research on the Mellow Dads parenting programme to an audience including representatives from West Midlands Police, Probation Service, Home Office, Ministry of Justice, Women's Aid, and Victim Support. On the day we were joined by the children, partners, and Dads involved with the programme along with staff from Walsall Council, University of Birmingham, and HMP Oakwood.
• Raquib Ibrahim from Mellow Parenting, outlined the Mellow Programme, his presentation can be seen here.
• Jessica Langston, University of Birmingham, gave an overview of the report which can be seen here.
• Everyone broke into small groups and the Dads led reflective activities whilst taking questions from the attendees.
• The Dads and staff involved with the programme performed a Question Time style question and answer session with the audience enquiring about their experiences on the programme.
• The event was ended with a powerful presentation from the child of one of the Dads who attended Mellow Dads, the presentation can be seen here, on each slide there is a red audio sign with the words of the young person are spoken.
• The event was covered by Rachel Carter from Community Care
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.familypotential.org/past-events/
 
Description Masterclass (Leeds) Whole family approaches to mental health - crossing the boundaries between adult and child services 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Masterclass presentation to over 100 social workers from Leeds City Council and associated organisations, working in children's and adults' services
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Practice Network for Family Group Conferencing with Adults 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact An event for FGC practitioners from across the UK with input and discussion around the themes of:
Involving young carers
Methodologies for evaluating outcomes
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Widening the circle: re-thinking family support in safeguarding (Huddersfield) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Nationally and internationally we have seen the development of new approaches to working with families in adversity. This seminar for practitioners and voluntary sector organisations explored the relationship of whole-family working and approaches to safeguarding, in particular:
• The role of men in families and their networks where there are safeguarding issues
• Whole family approaches to domestic abuse
• The role of family support in safeguarding
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.familypotential.org/past-events/