Maximising the Impact of Games as Effective Participative Tools: The Rufopoly Resource Kit

Lead Research Organisation: Birmingham City University
Department Name: CEBE Sch of Eng & the Built Enviroment

Abstract

Rufopoly is a participatory learning board game enabling players to undertake a journey through a fictitious rural urban fringe called RUFshire, answering questions and making decisions on development challenges and place-making; those answers then inform each player's vision for RUFshire. The encountered questions are determined by the roll of a die and based on primary data collected for a Relu project (2010-2012) about Managing Environmental Change at the Rural Urban Fringe. Rufopoly has been used extensively in early stages of projects and plans such as the pioneering Greater Birmingham and Solihull Local Enterprise Partnership spatial plan and has been used by government, EU project groups, local authorities, business, community groups, universities and schools. It has exposed audiences to issues associated with the delivery and trade-offs associated with planning and environmental issues at the fringe but crucially without the use of complex jargon.

We believe that the full potential and impact of Rufopoly has yet to be fully realised. There are several reasons for this:
1. Rufopoly was developed towards the end of our Relu project as an unplanned output for a conference run by Relu in 2011 on 'Who Should run the Countryside?'. Its success prompted its inclusion as an output.
2. There were insufficient funds for it to be successfully tested and integrated with policy and practice communities to maximise its utility as a learning tool as this was never the original intention of the project.
3. It is currently presented as a one size fits all board game of a hypothetical place. More time is needed to explore the potential of Rufopoly to become a generic platform for stakeholders wishing to develop their own versions of the tool to meet their own needs and to fill a widely recognised gap in the effectiveness of participatory tools for improved decsion making.

This knowledge exchange project addresses these deficiencies by drawing together the shared knowledge and previous experiences of designers and users of Rufopoly. This informs a series of interactive workshops in Wales, England and Scotland to identify how this kind of game-format can be enhanced into a more effective and multifunctional tool. This will help extend and embed the impact for a range of policy and practice partners in the form of a Rufopoly Resource Kit. By working collaboratively with end users we can identify how Rufopoly can be reconfigured across different user groups and organisations in tune with their agendas and needs. There are four stages to this project:
WP1: Review and learn lessons from previous Rufopoly experiences. This involves (1) an assessment of the actual results and findings from past games that were written up and the results analysed. (2) critical assessments of the strengths and weaknesses of Rufopoly from facilitators and core participants. We will draw priamirly from our UK experiences but are also able to secure insights from the international adaptations of Rufopoly from Nebraska (November 2013) and Sweden (2014).
WP2: Conduct a series of interactive workshops with different policy and practice audiences. These workshops will be held in England, Scotland and Wales using members of the research team and other participants. The purpose of these workshops is to (1) share results of WP1; (2) assess how the tool could be reconfigured to address the principla needs and challenges facing participants; and (3) prioritise feasible options for a Rufopoly Resource Kit.
WP3: Using WP1 and WP2 outcomes, we will design and trial (across our team) the Rufopoly 'Mk2' resource kit and associated materials/guidance.
WP4: Launch the Rufopoly Resource Kit and guidance in a live streamed global workshop event. This would; reveal the basic resource kit as co-designed by the team and enable testers of the resource kit to share their experiences maximising knowledge exchange and its range of potential applications.

Planned Impact

This project is designed to maximize impact in policy and practice through its co-production ethic involving academic, policy and practice participants and audiences throughout the 4 work packages. Crucially the project team involves representatives across public, private and voluntary sectors who, in effect, perform Co-Investigator roles in keeping with Scott's previous ESRC research model.

Impact is embedded in the project aims and objectives where we seek to build from the current configuration of multiple player board-game formats into a more versatile and user-friendly resource kit that will enable different groups and agencies to modify and adapt the learning tool according to their own needs and priorities.

To date Rufopoly has been used largely to shape initial consultations of plans such as the award winning spatial plan from the Greater Birmingham and Solihull LEP, the Welsh Assembly Government planning consultations and GCSE A level Geography curriculum in W-Midlands schools. Our goal in this work is to extend the way in which the impact can be developed and enhanced by identifying key gaps in use of current participative tools and key needs of our user groups. This intelligence will inform the design of the new Rufopoly resource kit.

Who will benefit?
The prime beneficiaries of this research are represented and embedded in the project team to cover community groups, schools, local authorities, local enterprise partnerships, government agencies and non-departmental public bodies. Many of these have specifically committed staff resources and time to the project as part of the team. In addition policy-makers and practitioners who helped design Rufopoly in 2011 will be actively involved. The Rufopoly toolkit will be readily available and benefit other users within the beneficiary categories, potentially world-wide. Web site, twitter and video resources will ehlp publicise the project amongst wider publics.

How will they benefit from this research?
The project enables stakeholders to inform the future evolution of Rufopoly to address their particular needs. Through informing, designing, testing and evaluating the processes and outcomes together the resultant resource kit will be based on an effective knowledge exchange platform enabling many of the project team to perform a legacy component through their own networks of uses and value.

Whilst the project resources limit what can be developed we aim to have a resource that appeals to all stakeholders listed above. It will work across scales and sectors dealing with complex issues across policy and practice contexts. For example, potential benefits are for community groups carrying out neighbourhood plans; local authorities consulting over local plans; Local Enterprise Partnerships preparing their economic plans; pupils understanding the nature of the rural urban fringe as part of the national curriculum and exam board syllabuses. Furthermore, our partners will ensure that the governance needs of the Scottish, Welsh and English governments are addressed through identification of hooks within which a successful Rufopoly resource kit can be embedded.

Key is to move beyond the current board-format tool and to develop a full set of resources and guidance that enable the tool to become embedded more effectively in a range of different policy and decision making processes. To have maximum impact, however, there is a chicken and egg situation as we can not, nor should, prejudge what the favoured resources and guidance will look like in the bid process. This is where our co-production ethic comes in.

The research work will make a significant contribution to improving the quality of proactive consultation to inform policy and decision making processes. This is a key gap in the armory of many agencies at present and thus will significantly support core spatial planning and environment agenda

Publications


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Carter C (2015) Article in TRIPWIRE


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SCOTT AJ (2016) Playing Around with PARTICIPOLOGY in Integration and Implementation Insights

 
Description 1. There is no such thing as a quick participatory fix. You have to invest sufficient time upfront in the planning, delivery and evaluate phases and actions to maximise success. From our shared experiences on this project we have identified the following key principles
Clarity (identify/agree aims, remit and scope with your audience)
Bounding (define boundaries of the exercise and identify non negotiables)
Inclusivity (involve all relevant interests; going beyond usual suspects where appropriate)
Appropriateness (suit technique to situation in proportionate manner to task )
Timing (involve people as early as possible and go beyond a one off tick-box)
Informing (provide ongoing dialogue of events and how you use information)
Effective (be pragmatic and flexible measuring how well you are doing and learn lessons)
Recording (record outcomes of exercise in a suitable way for intended purpose/audience).
So What? (Go beyond a one-off tick box exercise; make consultation mean something)

2. Using a team of academic, policy and practice partners working together, an effective participatory resource kit can be successfully co-designed and co-produced. The end product punches well above its academic and policy weight. Using a managed and deliberative process it is important to provide "safe" opportunities and spaces to enable our partners to maximise knowledge exchange and social learning. From sharing lessons learnt in initial workshops; to developing and agreeing collectively a suitable resource kit framework; to testing it selectively on real life projects and modifying it in light of these experiences, we produced a robust and "oven ready" resource that has significant buy in across the policy and practice community.

3. A game format can facilitate and stimulate engagement by breaking down silo-thinking and mediating between different interests and positions. By using a random "dice" element people confront different issues and by using different play formats (eg role play) it can be an effective catalyst for more holistic/strategic thinking which gets sufficient distance from existing loggerhead or entrenched views or ways of thinking

4. It is important to design a resource that users can tailor to their own uses rather than develop a specific one size fits all participatory product. Indeed in our testing phases we found that people involved in the process of designing a given board and questions secured multiple benefits and ownership before even playing the game. By combining the two aspects (design and play) for a given group there were significant gains in buy in and enthusiasm (e.g Queen Mary Grammar School Walsall). Here flexibility and adaptability are key to meeting our partners' needs.

5. Policy and practice champions have a key role to disseminate Participology and support its wider application for maximum impact. By enabling our partners to test the tool in their own real work programmes as part of the research process they have become embedded in the outcomes and hopefully inspired to carry out their own further work and knowledge exchange. This is further facilitated by developing an interactive forum in the Participology toolkit and enabling further uploads of material to keep it as a live resource for potential users. Designing a research project where the outcome was unknown and would only emerge through the co-production process is a challenging task. However by allowing the project to evolve organically and not predefining the output we argue that we have produced a powerful and sustainable research model .
Exploitation Route The web portal provides a one stop shop for stakeholders and wider publics to engage with the resources freely in pursuit of their participatory goals. In addition they can upload material and questions to keep participology as a living participatory resource. A forum which is monitored on a weekly basis provides a means of engagement as does a twitter site. #participology

The legacy and impact component involves working with a range of our existing partners on their existing Participology designs to help them bring their work through to fruition. We will also update the resource to make the web site topical. We are also working with new partners who have found out about participology and our designing their own game formats and wider training resources.

Projects are on going with
1. *Queen Mary School to develop an A level geography resource kit for all schools
2. *Royal Town Planning Institute to develop a planning game for their Ambassadors project.
3. *Institute for Agricultural and Fisheries Research (ILVO) Flanders to help with their landscape strategy development.
4. Work with Andrea Pelligram and David Jarvis Associates (consultants) to develop a resource for councillors.
5.* Natural England are using the resource for CPD and for introducing the ecosystem approach.

(*all projects are in the case study section of the participology web site.)
Sectors Agriculture, Food and Drink,Construction,Creative Economy,Energy,Environment,Healthcare,Leisure Activities, including Sports, Recreation and Tourism,Government, Democracy and Justice,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections,Retail,Transport,Other
URL http://www.participology.com/index.php
 
Description The research process stressing co creation and co production has generated multiple impacts and learning within our project partners as the Participology resource kit was tested in its initial format (RUFkit) in 2015. The key aspect of the research was that the testing phases used real projects on the ground to test the kit and thus were embedding the tool in their real work programme. This maximises potential impact from the start. For example : 1. Queen Mary Grammar School using it as a teaching tool for A Level Geography. 2. Royal Town Planning Institute developing their own game board to use as part of their Ambassadors programme 3. South Downs national park developing a board to be used as part of the green infrastructure local plan consultation 4. Rural Urban Fringe of Adelaide being used as a tool for consultation on a strategic plan for the region. 5. Belgian Government Research institute using to to assess landscape preferences and strategies in Flanders. 6. Natural England using it as staff development tool to help improve understanding of the ecosystem approach. 7. Natural Resource Wales developing a board game to look at the impacts of new legislation. 8. Lewes Neighbourhood Plan trying to use the resource kit to help progress the latter stages of their plan process. 9 PLANED rural development project trying to use this within their rural development projects. One aspect of this approach where projects were using the tool in their time frames was that they were not all completed by the time the project ended. However the lessons learned were very informative in helping us refine the resource kit itself. It is the idea of testing and refinement that produces a double win of impact but also helping us build a better product through identifying problems. All the lessons learnt are in the participology resource kit web portal which is a one stop shop. MARCH 2016 UPDATE Since March 2016 Participology has been used and further applications developed within our original case studies as well as in a range of other research, policy and professional settings. Our assessment of the impact of our Knowledge Exchange Project and the creation of the Participology resource (www.participology.com/) to date is based on the interest created in this resource and its uptake as a participatory tool to help deliver project outcomes. Importantly here, Participology is establishing itself as a valued resource within the existing 'toolkit' of participatory techniques and has received recognition from other research council projects, statutory development plan processes and professional bodies and associations. 1. Update on Existing Case Studies and the Creation of Extended / Novel Applications 1.1 Flanders Using the online Participology resource the Visionary board game(s) was designed with further funding secured from EU 1. A general version of Visionary was based on a typical suburban aerial picture of Flanders. The game focuses on discussing some typical spatial themes for Flanders and aims to sensitize people to spatial planning challenges and possibilities. 2. An area specific version of Visionary was created homing in on specific problems and opportunities of the case study area. In addition to raising awareness about these challenges and possibilities, the game encouraged thinking about specific planning projects and the goal was to collect some building bricks for enabling projects in the area. A region-specific version of Visionary was produced showing the landscape park Bulskampveld. The game content and rules drew on area specific knowledge that was obtained from an interview with a regional developer. After testing the table-top board game with six regional developers the game was fine-tuned and finalised. In March 2016, Visionary was played with professionals active in the region using two board games with three payers each. In July 2016 Visionary was played with 9 residents of the region around two board games that were 5m x 5m so that players could walk across and 'engage' with the 'landscape'. This dimension was really interesting and points the way forward for improved impact with publics as they can more easily explore a landscape in this large-size game setting. The output of those sessions was collected and processed. The participants involved saw that Visionary could be a new method to give ideas to the policy makers in the region. An instruction manual was written for both types of Visionary covering instructions for its creation and playing. Soon, these manuals will be published for download (in Dutch) on the IVLO website. 1.2 Queen Mary Grammar School Walsall Following on from the initial experiment under the KE project, testing the creation of game questions and rules with a small group of A level students, the adapted Rufopoly game has since become a regular feature of the curriculum for A level geography at Queen Mary Grammar School Walsall. Here students research the rural urban fringe and develop their own specific questions to add to the pool of questions for the game and also follow the Participology online resource to produce their own version of the game to stimulate thinking about how different social, economic and environmental interests and challenges affect decision-making and need to be accounted for. An article is currently being written for inclusion in Geography Journal (Geographical Association) to promote this application of Participology as a teaching tool for A Level students. 1.3 RTPI West Midlands Gain from Playing the Planning Game In November 2016, Claudia Carter (BCU) has secured funding from the RTPI West Midlands to develop a planning game for outreach activities with students and to support A-level curricula themes that are specific as well as cross-cutting (e.g. Geography, Economics, Politics) and to appreciate the value and role of planning. This is being coproduced in 2017 with planners from the West Midlands and North West regions, the RTPI Head of Careers, Education & Professional Development, the Geography Lead of Geography at Queen Mary Grammar School Walsall and the BCU core team (Carter and Scott). The game will help communicate and experience the art and science of spatial planning. Addressing challenges and considering opportunities for city regions the board game exposes players to the scope and value of planning through different scenarios. We have secured £4.5k from RTPI West Midlands for stage 1 to develop the game resources. There is further funding subject to competitive bidding for its evaluation. 1.4 Politicians in Planning Association Annual meeting 2016 Manchester Participology also featured in the 2016 annual event of the Politicians in Planning Association (PiPA) supported by the RTPI. Here councillors from across the whole of the UK met to discuss devolution. Participology was used for an afternoon workshop in which 18 councillors were briefed about the tool and then designed questions based on the morning's plenary session and used these to then play a game. The workshop helped raise the profile of the game as a tool for engagement over planning issues amongst this user audience. Feedback to RTPI was excellent with the Northern Ireland contingent in discussions about using the tool as part of councillor training. The organisers of the Young planners RTPI conference want to use the tool in a workshop event in 2017. 2. New Applications and Impact generated from the Web Portal Participology has also featured in new research and policy outputs reflecting its ability to appeal to audiences from the web portal alone, rather than via direct connections with the creators of the resource. 2.1 Local Government Knowledge navigator project (February 2016) follow-on project http://www.lgkn.org/2016/02/maximising-the-impact-of-games-as-effective-participative-tools-the-rufopoly-resource-kit/ The 'Local Government Research Facilitator' is a one-year initiative funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC), and steered by the ESRC, the Local Government Association and the Society of Local Authority Chief Executives. It builds on the work of the 'Local Government Knowledge Navigator' project helping local governments to make better use of existing national investment in research and research-derived knowledge and evidence, and to influence future research agendas, programmes and investment. The RUFkit (now Participology) was selected as a case study [based on what? to use research derived knowledge? Featuring in a national local government focused project reflects the significance of the Participology resource as a tool linking research-policy and practice and a resource that can be used at the strategic level / by policy-makers in addition to decision-makers and practitioners. 2.2 Dudley Metropolitan Borough Council featured Participology as a tool for use in its Statement of Community Involvement (2016). www.dudley.gov.uk/EasysiteWeb/getresource.axd?AssetID=293459&type=full. The Community Involvement Statement is a highly influential document as part of the suite of documents that inform the statutory development plan. It sets out how the council will engage with local residents, businesses and community groups in the preparation of planning documents and the consideration of planning applications. Thus the explicit mention of Participology is significant, illustrating it as a tool of choice and being recommended for practice in neighbourhood / local planning. In section 2.11 the community involvement document states "Planning for Real and similar methods of consultation, like Participology, can help us to engage with the community in a participative process leading to a plan or strategy, using models and other visual aids. These methods will particularly useful in Neighbourhood Planning and in the preparation of other area- based plans and strategies". This helps residents of Dudley access our resource in their own local based initiatives. 2.3 Public Health Wales and NHS Wales have featured Participology as one of their participatory tools compiled by Matthew Ward (2016). http://www.publichealthnetwork.cymru/files/7214/6729/1264/Public_Engagement_-_A_Toolkit_Guide_and_Directory_for_Public_Health_and_Others.pdf Each of the 64 tools was reviewed and evaluated on a range of criteria. Using a scoring system for the tool it performs well against their evaluation criteria with no weaknesses identified. This is a welcome application into the health arena and demonstrates the flexibility, user-friendliness and appeal of the produced Participology resource. 2.4 AHRC project on food provision in later life (University of Hertfordshire 2016) http://www.foodprovisioninlaterlife.com/single-post/2016/08/09/Using-a-modified-board-game-strategy-to-facilitate-a-stakeholder-event Participology was used and adapted for a stakeholder event on this AHRC project showcasing its application for a highly specific topic (i.e. food creation) and in a scenario-building / visioning context. Crucially, the research team followed the guidance on the Participology platform without needing our involvement and reported its success as an effective engagement activity. As mentioned in the short blog, signposted in the link above, following the project event, participants requested to use the tool as a teaching tool for students nationally. 2.5 Participology has also been showcased in the Research Council UK and Innovate UK's 'Urban Living programme' Participology was used in three ways within the programme. First, it featured as part of the EPSRC pre-project town hall meeting exercise on 20 October 2015 where Prof Scott presented a session to potential bidders showcasing how Participology could be used to help shape citizen-led visions based on different scenarios associated with emerging results from the work packages. Second, as part of the successful Birmingham pilot project, Prof Scott presented Participology as an innovation station to help capture citizen ideas for change using results from the data workpackages. Third, it is also being developed to help councillors engage with the Urban Living Birmingham pilot project, building on the success of the 2016 Politicians in Planning Network meeting (see section 1.4 above). 2.6 University of Northumbria A further recent innovation and new area of impact is the use of Participology as a conflict management tool. This application was tested by Prof Scott with University of Northumbria built environment students as part of the Sustainable Development module KE3000. 2.7 Disaster Management application A further recent niche is the application of Participology for disaster management outreach to local secondary schools in the Newcastle area. The specific application is to create a school project resource led by the Disaster Management Society to help raise awareness of disaster management and mitigation through various disaster scenarios. 2.8 It has also served as an inspiration for BCU student dissertations. Kamran Fazil module BNV7103 2015-16 with the dissertation being submitted in Sept 2016. Evaluating the Levels of Education and Awareness of Deforestation Amongst Young People in Pangani District, Tanzania. Fazil used the Rufopoly game as a springboard for his own game creation. He had Tanzanian secondary school children design their own map of the local area and imposed a pizza / spokes like pattern on it where they then discussed pre-made answers in relation to their awareness of deforestation and forest degradation and all the connections in terms of social, economic and ecological impact. 2.9 University of Salford http://conference.rgs.org/AC2016/361. The Participology toolkit was used to produce an interactive paper and session for the Royal Geographical Society's Annual Conference in September 2016. Through working with the MISTRA Urban Future programme, we co-created a session around the theme of urban food security. Due to the international nature of the session, presenters were tasked with providing an overview of the contexts in which they were working. Through gamification we created a board game to provide an interactive overview of Greater Manchester's foodscape. Through doing so, we were able to provide a feel for the space and its complexity to the international audience. Some 45 people attended and the game has been sent to MISTRA http://www.mistra.org/en/mistra.html participating countries following the session. 3. Network and Esteem 3.1 Professional recognition in the RTPI Sir Peter Hall award shortlist http://www.rtpi.org.uk/knowledge/research/rtpi-awards-for-research-excellence/sir-peter-hall-award-for-wider-engagement/ Participology was nominated and shortlisted for the Sir Peter Hall award for engagement as part of the Royal Town Planning Institute awards for excellence in planning research 2016. Whilst it did not win it received significant press attention and public exposure in what is the planning profession's annual showcase of planning research across the UK. 3.2 LinkedIn Community https://www.linkedin.com/groups/12021657 A LinkedIn group with 50 followers has been set up following some problems encountered with our initial Participology internet-site based forum (300). This LinkedIn site features articles promoting the wider aspects of the toolkit and its principles. This has created a forum for sharing the use of Participology and there are various articles and discussions. 3.3 Participology has its own unique google identity with no other search returns using the name. This has made it really useful to track its use in other fields across the web. 3.4 Participology has its own Twitter account. @Participology with nearly 200 followers. 3.5 http://www.participology.com/ is the main project web site. It has had a further update this year and is being maintained by Scott as part of the legacy component of the project. This is the key mechanism that raises peoples awareness of the project and the material therein provides information and guidance for setting up bespoke projects as well as having resources for groups to use boards and questions and game cards. The current ability of Participology to have its own unique search results has proved very useful in tracking down projects that have used the resource.
First Year Of Impact 2015
Sector Agriculture, Food and Drink,Communities and Social Services/Policy,Environment,Healthcare,Leisure Activities, including Sports, Recreation and Tourism,Government, Democracy and Justice,Other
Impact Types Cultural,Societal,Economic
 
Description Research grants scheme regional (West Midlands)
Amount £4,500 (GBP)
Organisation Royal Town Planning Institute RTPI 
Sector Learned Society
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK)
Start 05/2017 
End 05/2018
 
Title Participology 
Description Participoloy is a web portal allowing full access to potential viewers to design, plan and evaluate a board game format to improve participatory processes and outcomes. This is the key outcome from this knowledge exchange project which enables policy and practice communities to understand good principles of participation and use this to design their game board format. It has resource banks for boards and questions and gives support on designing bespoke versions. It has a growing library of case studies as groups and bodies start to use it. So far this has principally, though not exclusively, been with our partners. There is also a forum http://www.participology.com/ 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2016 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact As this tool is only just produced the impacts are only starting to emerge but 1. One of our partners Queen Mary Grammar School Walsall have used this for their Geography A Level studies to help them understand contested issues around the urban fringe. This is currently being written up as a case study for all schools. 2. Salford University have used the tool with a range of primary schools to help them understand issues in their neighbourhood. 
URL http://www.participology.com/
 
Title Participology Video 
Description This is a video that introduces potential users to the Participlogy output. As such it exposes people to its potential as a participatory tool and signals some of its applications thus far. It is a self standing resource that helps people understand the power and limitations of games as tools set within an ever increasing toolkit for participation. 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2016 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact This video has only been produced a week ago at the time of reporting. 
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VY4Mkqunh-k
 
Description A resource to help engage with adaptation to sustainable development in the West Midlands - Climate KIC 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact This was a workshop with a group of international sustainability students looking to develop a game board reflecting adaptation to climate change challenges and opportunities . Staff from Birmingham City University facilitated the workshop in conjunction with Climate KIC West Midlands led by Ben Onyido. A board was designed and populated with questions during a 3 hour intensive workshop . Tasks were allocated to different tables, with questions designed according to a set goal.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.participology.com/casestudy-files/Climate%20KIC%20West%20Midlands%20report.pdf
 
Description A resource to help think through strategic planning concerns - Barossa Valley, Adelaide 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact A workshop held in late 2015 to discuss strategic planning in the Barossa Valley and evaluate the PARTICIPOLOGY game board format. A version of the game was played with scenarios relating broadly to significant, contemporary planning issues in the region. Participants included representatives from planning, regional development, industry, commerce, education and the general community. The workshop was conducted around five tables, each with a facilitator and four 'players'.

The outcomes have led to significant interest in pursuing this approach to their strategic planning consultation which has important lessons for UK planning approaches. The project was led by our partner the University of Adelaide and South Australian Government.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.participology.com/casestudy-files/Barossa%20Valley%20Adelaide.pdf
 
Description Aberystwyth workshop for Rufopoly resource kit forms part of Work Package 2. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact The workshop sought to co create a resource kit to build on the Rufopoly game but enabling more flexibility. Having played the game ideas were sought in a series of structure workshops to build suggestions for a resource kit.

Having held similar workshops in Birmingham and Edinburgh we were then able to integrate the combined suggestions into a draft resource kit proposal.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.participology.com/pdfs/The%20Rufopoly%20Resource%20Kit%20Proposed%20version.pdf
 
Description Birmingham Workshop : Rufopoly Resource Kit Workpackage 2 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact This formed a core component of Work page 2 of our research and involved our project partners coming together to play Rufopoly and then collectively co-create a resource kit that met the project goals
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.participology.com/pdfs/The%20Rufopoly%20Resource%20Kit%20Proposed%20version.pdf
 
Description Edinburgh workshop for Rufopoly Resource Kit this formed part of Work package 2 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact This workshop helped shape the draft Rufopoly resource kit. After playing a game of Rufopoly and hearing about other game adaptations the group cocreated a resource kit structure to feed into the next phase of the project.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.participology.com/pdfs/The%20Rufopoly%20Resource%20Kit%20Proposed%20version.pdf
 
Description Forum for Participatory discussions. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact In the latter stages of this project we created a forum space to formally record view and comments about our resource kit. It progressed from RUFkit in March 2015 to Participology in March 2016.

We will continue to use this as the feedback mechanism for users to tell us what they think; start new threads and we will monitor it on a weekly basis.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015,2016
URL http://www.participology.com/forum/
 
Description Local Government Navigator case study : Maximising the impact of games as effective participative tools: the Rufopoly Resource kit 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This is a case study under the Local Government Knowledge Navigator which highlights exemplar case studies on topics relevant to local government. As it is funded by ESRC it helps showcase research with local government practice.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.lgkn.org/2016/02/maximising-the-impact-of-games-as-effective-participative-tools-the-rufo...
 
Description Participology on twitter 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact As a result of our resource kit we have created a social media account via twitter to help progress and raise awareness of the tool.
@participology is a new account created after the final workshop. This now becomes the core social media account to promote and spread the key contents of the tool and engage with new followers.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://twitter.com/participology
 
Description Playing around with Participology Final workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This was a final workshop enabling participants to share their experiences in testing our resource kit on its journey to become Participology. The agenda involved presentations, workshops and question times. We were able to host Belgian and Australasian presenters. We also were able to use live video streaming to enable colleagues form overseas to engage. As such we had Dutch, Swedish, Scottish, Italian and Austrilaian participants who were able to send questions via a chat box.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Politicians in Planning Annual Meeting Participology workshop Manchester 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Councillors were introduced to the participology resource kit and its past applications in policy and practice . They were then given a draft board game with questions and required to devise two questions from the morning session of the RTPI presentations and talks.
They then played a quick game version to capture the power and potential of the tool.
The workshop session was foro ne hour and involved 22 councillors
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.rtpi.org.uk/briefing-room/news-releases/2016/november/politicians-in-planning-conference-...
 
Description Primary School Resource Kit evaluation 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact A primary school version of Rufopoly was designed to engage young children and tap into their creativity and enthusiasm.
Using the original version of Rufopoly the questions were adapted and played with a range of primary schools across the Salford region. Mike Hardman led this project.

Further work with schools is planned leading to a primary school kit that meets national curriculum outcomes and key stages
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015,2016
URL http://www.participology.com/casestudy-files/Salford%20case%20study.pdf
 
Description Queen Mary Grammar School Walsall evaluation case study 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact A workshop with Geography A level students looking to develop a game board to deal with their studies and curriculum with a wider view to making it a national school resource. Alister Scott from BCU and Rob Matley from Queen Mary's Grammar School facilitated two
workshops enabling the board to be designed, populated with questions as well as play a draft game. Tasks associated with different question spaces were allocated to different tables with questions designed according to a set goal. The goal related around the need to understand
contested issues around the urban rural fringe as it affects the sustainable development agenda. This was translated into specific entry and end tasks
Workshop 1 October 2015 involved designing some questions around the board based at Queen Mary's Grammar School. Issues associated with the PLAY mode were also discussed.
Workshop 2 December 2015 was at BCU and involved interaction with our planning students to build and develop a full set of questions
After this all the questions were merged into one document and then a game was played. Time limited question verification but the end result was very positive.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015,2016
URL http://www.participology.com/casestudy-files/Queen%20Mary's%20School%20Walsall.pdf
 
Description The Regeneration game Politicians in Planning Annual meeting 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact This case study shows how a board was developed for a one-off workshop as part of the Politicians in Planning Network (PIPA) annual meeting.

The board was developed by Paul Gibbs (David Jarvis Associates) and Alister Scott (Birmingham City University). The original Rufopoly board was used and questions were adapted from a previous adaption of Rufopoly from the Greater Birmingham and Solihull LEP game of growth - see http://www.slideshare.net/AlisterScott/gbslep-playing-the-game-of-growth.

The game was played using two tables of five participants. Each table was given half the questions and asked to verify and validate them according to the goal of the workshop on understanding the ingredients for successful growth and regeneration. Here, changes were made and in addition respondents were asked to design one question each (two bespoke questions drawing on the morning session). The questions were read out and answered by respondents putting down their immediate reaction and sharing it with the group and then moving on to discuss it for about 10 minutes. There was an attempt made to seek a consensus on the question with the overall answer and supporting justification recorded. Participants also recorded their own views.

The power of a game board format was recognised with the dice proving a useful randomiser. The structure of the debate allowed everyone to chip in at the start which enabled a dialogue to ensue. Of particular importance here is how you can adapt a conference setting to include a game board exercise drawing on the material from a morning session. Using previous questions is also useful but participants valued greatly the ability to verify and validate the questions with on table in particular changing questions to reflect their specific needs

It was clear that this game could provide a key training resource for councillors and this forms part of the next phase of our work.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.participology.com/casestudy-files/PIPA%20evaluation%20report.pdf