Culture, Sport and Wellbeing Evidence Review: Social Diversity and Context Matters

Lead Research Organisation: Brunel University
Department Name: Clinical Sciences

Abstract

Project aims
This project aims to find out about the subjective wellbeing (SWB) benefits of different culture and sport practices and how they are distributed between different groups and user communities including: males and females, different socioeconomic groups, diverse ethnic and minority groups; a range of age groups; and people with disabilities. We also wish to ensure that our findings on SWB can be most effectively combined to meaningfully inform policy about, and delivery of culture and sport activities.
Definition of subjective wellbeing
Throughout our project we will use the Office of National Statistics definition of SWB which monitors SWB in terms of life satisfaction, experiences of happiness and worry, and worthwhile things in life.
Collaborative approach to the project
To conduct our project, a group of researchers from Brunel University London, the London School of Economics and the University of Brighton will work closely with 5 stakeholder groups; policy makers, commissioners, service deliverers, leaders and the public who are interested in finding, promoting and sharing the evidence to maximise the potential of culture and sport to enhance SWB. We will run a series of workshops in the first 6 months of the project where stakeholders will have the opportunity to discuss with researchers the relevance of SWB to culture and sport and to agree key topics and questions which can be answered using systematic searches of a range of literature sources. In the remainder of the project the researchers will identify and assess the evidence for the topics suggested and report to stakeholder groups through a series of ideas exchange workshops. We will focus on ensuring that the best evidence is presented and disseminated to relevant groups so that they can use it to inform policy on and delivery of cultural and sporting practices. We have support for our project from several stakeholders in the culture and sport sectors. We recognise that stakeholders have time and workforce challenges in supporting this kind of project and so we will work to use a range of on-line and virtual methods of communication as well as face-to-face approaches.
Project methods
We will use a variety of established methods for systematically identifying and evaluating existing evidence on culture, sport and wellbeing for different user groups. We will collect and review a range of types of evidence from different sources including the published academic literature, reports and surveys. We can provide short written overviews of evidence, longer reports with statistical reviews, and evaluation of cost information tailored to the objectives and requirements of different stakeholder groups.
Communicating the findings of our project
In our project we emphasise that for research evidence to have the most impact on culture, sport and wellbeing policy and practice, the people affected by the research need to be involved in work that reviews, synthesises and shares that evidence. We will communicate our findings to stakeholders throughout our project using employing a variety of methods including face-to-face discussion groups, a project website and twitter feed, and on-line focus groups. We will deliver an end of project 'findings' conference to include the diversity of audiences that our stakeholders represent. We will also deliver 3 public exhibitions of our findings at local cultural and sporting venues (including libraries, museums and sport facilities. To ensure that our findings are communicated to a UK audience we will also hold a series of national forums in Edinburgh, Cardiff and Belfast.

Planned Impact

Background to impact
We work closely with stakeholders in sport and health (Brunel), wellbeing policy (LSE) and culture (Brighton). We recognise that policy and decision makers, commissioners and managers and service delivery groups experience significant time pressures and workforce capacity issues in being involved in collaborative projects.
Impact objectives
We focus on short, medium and long term achievements framed by three impact objectives:
-to collaborate with key stakeholders in culture and sport to agree topics and outcomes most important to policy and practice
-to develop awareness of the evidence synthesis; sharing our findings amongst culture and sport stakeholders
-to influence stakeholders in developing policy and practice to enhance wellbeing through culture and sport, to diverse communities across the life course
Stakeholder engagement/communication
Stakeholders have informed this proposal from the concept stage. We will communicate with stakeholders in the collaborative development phase (months 1-6) via 3 formal workshops, flexibly delivered, for each of 5 key stakeholders (policy makers, commissioners/managers, deliverers, public, scholars/fellows). Workshops will focus upon designing an effective evidence review programme, and developing, implementing and evaluating our impact strategy. Project delivery post month 6 will focus on innovative and effective communication strategies for disseminating, co-producing and promoting findings and learning. We propose an end of project 'findings' conference and a series of 3 public exhibitions to be held at local venues e.g. libraries or museums, local community sports facilities.
Application/opportunities
There is a strong tradition of public engagement in our consortium. Work will be presented at public engagement events e.g. public lectures, seminars and exhibitions, and talks to local groups. Our stakeholders have been invited to reflect the relevance and interest of our project to a broad audience. Their engagement will enable stakeholders to challenge evidence and examine how it relates to real world experiences to maximise potential impact. This will include: posting project idea and findings on a website hosted by Brunel University London; developing a public twitter feed; policy and decision maker focussed newsletters; practitioner case studies; and teaching resources for students on related educational programmes. We propose to develop a commissioning and delivery toolkit for those designing cultural and sport activities for wellbeing outcomes.
Implementation of impact
To facilitate effective communication, and aid co-production of knowledge and integration of findings into policy and practice we will appoint a Knowledge Transfer Fellow (KTF) who will undertake a Knowledge Transfer Secondment to BULondon. This will allow for direct participation of a culture / sport practitioner in project management and delivery, and establish a champion for disseminating findings to key user groups.
Evaluating impact
Evaluation will focus on monitoring success in our 3 impact objectives. Evaluation of the collaborative development phase will use verbal summary, review and evaluation techniques which will be recorded and assessed. Evaluation findings will aid planning and development activities. We will keep an impact evaluation diary within our project journal (including transcribed notes of workshops, academic evidence review team meetings, and activities in the ideas exchange programme). This will record our experiences of developing and delivering the project, and the impact that we make. We will record website usage capturing details of the types of individuals accessing the site; we will evaluate our evidence review events via questionnaires, selected interviews and participation data. This evaluation will be made publicly available to help other social science researchers develop their own impact pathways.
 
Description We have shown that the vast majority of older people do not experience loneliness (70%), 1% are always lonely and 20% have a fluctuating pattern of loneliness over 10 years; 4% moved into loneliness and 5% moved out over this period.

Thus the population defined as lonely can be divided into 4 distinct groups-the always lonely; those for whom loneliness is a new experience in later life; those for whom loneliness decreases and those with a fluctuating pattern. Each of these different groups may benefit from different types of intervention.
Exploitation Route Can be used to determine the different types of 'loneliness' within a given population of older people and used to develop, implement and explore different types of interventions to prevent and remediate loneliness
Sectors Communities and Social Services/Policy,Healthcare,Other
 
Description Advisory Group for the All Party Parliamentary Group on Arts, Health and Wellbeing
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a national consultation
 
Description Arts for Health and Wellbeing: What do research findings tell us about a new form of practice? Key Note Address: Royal Society for Public Health Special Interest Group Arts, Health and Wellbeing, Day Conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact This keynote addressed provided an update on current researchfindings about arts and health and how these challenge contemporary practice and suggest new ways to practice.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Creative and Credible Evaluation for arts, health and wellbeing. Keynote Presentation. TanDem Arts and Dementia Conference: Research into Practice, University of Nottingham. 6th October 2016 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This presentation outlined the potential for developing a toolkit of methods for evaluating arts based health/wellbeing interventions that are both credible and feasible for organisations to use. We are being contacted by organisations since this talk to discuss methods of evaluating interventions which is essential to build the evidence base for arts based interventions for those with dementia in particular.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description 1st International Arts & Dementia Research Conference, 9-10 March 2017, Royal Society for Public Health, London 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presentation to an audience at the Royal Society of Public Health meeting focusing upon the role of the arts in enhancing the wellbeing of people with dementia. Raised awareness of the potential of the arts in promoting wellbeing
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Arts for Health and Wellbeing: An Evaluation Framework. Keynote Presentation. Creative Hertfordshire's Art of Wellbeing Conference. Hatfield, Thursday 23rd June 2016. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This presentation discussed an evaluation framework for Arts for Health and Wellbeing. Thisis an essential development required to generate a robust evidence base and which arts based health and wellbeing interventions can use in their own settings
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Creative Hertfordshire's Art of Wellbeing Conference, 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Raised awareness of importance of arts for wellbeing among mixed audience of policy makers and practitioners. Participants made aware of what works programme and our specific project
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Creative and Credible: the challenge of coproduction in evidencing and developing music and arts for health and wellbeing. Keynote Presentation. British Association of Music Therapy Annual Conference, Glasgow, 7-9th April 2016. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This keynote scoped out the challenges of coproduction in evidencing and developing music and arts for health and wellbeing.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description National Developments in Arts, Health and Wellbeing. Keynote Presentation. Exploring the Contribution of Arts and Culture to Education and Wellbeing in Norfolk. Thursday 19th May 2016, Norfolk Arts Forum. Norwich Castle Museum & Art Gallery 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Provided update and overview of national level research and policy focusing upon arts and wellbeing and linked to the context of Norfolk..
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Presentation of project in Glasgow at the Merchants Festival-August 2016 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presentation of project to group of practitioners involved in the delivery of arts for wellbeing interventions in Scotland. Raised awareness of the project and identified the need among practitioners for an 'evaluation toolkit' to evidence the benefits of their work
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016