Lay perceptions, prejudice and the natural environment in the spread of animal-human and human-human infections

Lead Research Organisation: Brunel University
Department Name: School of Social Sciences

Abstract

Infection between animals and humans, and infection spread between humans, provides a major challenge to the health of societies across the world. In our work we bring together a variety of scientists and researchers from a range disciplines, alongside some of those most affected by this disease threat (including those running major sporting venues, the transport industry, and petting zoos). This unique team will then work together to produce the groundwork for a major research application on understanding infection spread, and potential aways in which infection risk can be best managed.

Technical Summary

New and evolving infectious diseases pose novel challenges to increasingly mobile populations. This creates a need to understand and model both the biological processes involved but also the social and environmental processes that influence animal-human and human-human interaction and infection threat. We will establish a new multi-disciplinary network of researchers from psychology, economics, epidemiology, biology, mathematical modelling and engineering, alongside government scientists and key end users from the transport industry, a sporting venue, a city farm and a health NGO. We develop this network through a series of bilateral and group meetings / workshops, break-out writing groups , and complement this with expert summary reports and web-based collaborative writing. This will thus prepare us for a larger multi-disciplinary application on the environmental and social ecology of human infectious diseases.

Publications


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Goodwin R (2012) Interdisciplinary approaches to zoonotic disease. in Infectious disease reports

 
Description MRC GCRF Foundation Awards Outline Application 
Organisation University of Warwick
Department Department of Physics
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution New collaboration with Dr Mike Tildesley at Warwick and colleagues at Fudan University China
Collaborator Contribution Application for MRC GCRF Foundation Awards
Impact Grant application for award
Start Year 2016
 
Description Major ESEI grant application 
Organisation Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC)
Department Pirbright Institute
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I led a large application through the ESEI mechanism for a grant entitled "HAZARD: Human Aspects of Zoonotic and Related Diseases". The partners on this application were the core group from the catalyst project plus most our other partners, plus new team members. Contributors in the catalyst project allowed us access to data and facilities (e.g. through site visits and significant intellectual input) as well as further networking opportunities to expand our network in preparation for the ESEI application
Collaborator Contribution Expertise on risk assessments of influenza transmissionExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission in the workplaceAccess to pet owners via vet practicesAccess to veterinary practicesExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission in city farms and access to facilities for the projectStakeholder advice on zoonotic threatExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission when walkingExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission on farmsAdvises on current data and future changes in farming practice and land useVeterinarian expertiseContribute to analysis of risk environmentsEvaluation of hygiene interventionsExpertise on virology and emerging epidemicsUnderstanding behavioural responses to epidemicsGreater understanding of contact patterns and infectionExpertise in quantitative livestock modellingEnvironmental health and engineering expertiseMathematical modelling of epidemicsEconomic modelling of health threatsSpecialism in modelling interactions between socio-economic and ecological systems
Impact The ESEI grant application HAZARD: Human Aspects of Zoonotic and Related Diseases. This was explicitly multidisciplinary involving academic expertise from psychology, environmental microbiology and engineering, livestock epidemiology and economics, veterinary science, medicine and anthropology, alongside a complementary group of policy makers and stakeholders,.
Start Year 2011
 
Description Major ESEI grant application 
Organisation Blue Cross UK
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution I led a large application through the ESEI mechanism for a grant entitled "HAZARD: Human Aspects of Zoonotic and Related Diseases". The partners on this application were the core group from the catalyst project plus most our other partners, plus new team members. Contributors in the catalyst project allowed us access to data and facilities (e.g. through site visits and significant intellectual input) as well as further networking opportunities to expand our network in preparation for the ESEI application
Collaborator Contribution Expertise on risk assessments of influenza transmissionExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission in the workplaceAccess to pet owners via vet practicesAccess to veterinary practicesExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission in city farms and access to facilities for the projectStakeholder advice on zoonotic threatExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission when walkingExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission on farmsAdvises on current data and future changes in farming practice and land useVeterinarian expertiseContribute to analysis of risk environmentsEvaluation of hygiene interventionsExpertise on virology and emerging epidemicsUnderstanding behavioural responses to epidemicsGreater understanding of contact patterns and infectionExpertise in quantitative livestock modellingEnvironmental health and engineering expertiseMathematical modelling of epidemicsEconomic modelling of health threatsSpecialism in modelling interactions between socio-economic and ecological systems
Impact The ESEI grant application HAZARD: Human Aspects of Zoonotic and Related Diseases. This was explicitly multidisciplinary involving academic expertise from psychology, environmental microbiology and engineering, livestock epidemiology and economics, veterinary science, medicine and anthropology, alongside a complementary group of policy makers and stakeholders,.
Start Year 2011
 
Description Major ESEI grant application 
Organisation British Meat Processors Association (BMPA)
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution I led a large application through the ESEI mechanism for a grant entitled "HAZARD: Human Aspects of Zoonotic and Related Diseases". The partners on this application were the core group from the catalyst project plus most our other partners, plus new team members. Contributors in the catalyst project allowed us access to data and facilities (e.g. through site visits and significant intellectual input) as well as further networking opportunities to expand our network in preparation for the ESEI application
Collaborator Contribution Expertise on risk assessments of influenza transmissionExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission in the workplaceAccess to pet owners via vet practicesAccess to veterinary practicesExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission in city farms and access to facilities for the projectStakeholder advice on zoonotic threatExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission when walkingExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission on farmsAdvises on current data and future changes in farming practice and land useVeterinarian expertiseContribute to analysis of risk environmentsEvaluation of hygiene interventionsExpertise on virology and emerging epidemicsUnderstanding behavioural responses to epidemicsGreater understanding of contact patterns and infectionExpertise in quantitative livestock modellingEnvironmental health and engineering expertiseMathematical modelling of epidemicsEconomic modelling of health threatsSpecialism in modelling interactions between socio-economic and ecological systems
Impact The ESEI grant application HAZARD: Human Aspects of Zoonotic and Related Diseases. This was explicitly multidisciplinary involving academic expertise from psychology, environmental microbiology and engineering, livestock epidemiology and economics, veterinary science, medicine and anthropology, alongside a complementary group of policy makers and stakeholders,.
Start Year 2011
 
Description Major ESEI grant application 
Organisation British Small Animal Veterinary Association (BSAVA)
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution I led a large application through the ESEI mechanism for a grant entitled "HAZARD: Human Aspects of Zoonotic and Related Diseases". The partners on this application were the core group from the catalyst project plus most our other partners, plus new team members. Contributors in the catalyst project allowed us access to data and facilities (e.g. through site visits and significant intellectual input) as well as further networking opportunities to expand our network in preparation for the ESEI application
Collaborator Contribution Expertise on risk assessments of influenza transmissionExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission in the workplaceAccess to pet owners via vet practicesAccess to veterinary practicesExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission in city farms and access to facilities for the projectStakeholder advice on zoonotic threatExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission when walkingExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission on farmsAdvises on current data and future changes in farming practice and land useVeterinarian expertiseContribute to analysis of risk environmentsEvaluation of hygiene interventionsExpertise on virology and emerging epidemicsUnderstanding behavioural responses to epidemicsGreater understanding of contact patterns and infectionExpertise in quantitative livestock modellingEnvironmental health and engineering expertiseMathematical modelling of epidemicsEconomic modelling of health threatsSpecialism in modelling interactions between socio-economic and ecological systems
Impact The ESEI grant application HAZARD: Human Aspects of Zoonotic and Related Diseases. This was explicitly multidisciplinary involving academic expertise from psychology, environmental microbiology and engineering, livestock epidemiology and economics, veterinary science, medicine and anthropology, alongside a complementary group of policy makers and stakeholders,.
Start Year 2011
 
Description Major ESEI grant application 
Organisation Government of the UK
Department Department For Environment, Food And Rural Affairs (DEFRA)
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution I led a large application through the ESEI mechanism for a grant entitled "HAZARD: Human Aspects of Zoonotic and Related Diseases". The partners on this application were the core group from the catalyst project plus most our other partners, plus new team members. Contributors in the catalyst project allowed us access to data and facilities (e.g. through site visits and significant intellectual input) as well as further networking opportunities to expand our network in preparation for the ESEI application
Collaborator Contribution Expertise on risk assessments of influenza transmissionExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission in the workplaceAccess to pet owners via vet practicesAccess to veterinary practicesExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission in city farms and access to facilities for the projectStakeholder advice on zoonotic threatExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission when walkingExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission on farmsAdvises on current data and future changes in farming practice and land useVeterinarian expertiseContribute to analysis of risk environmentsEvaluation of hygiene interventionsExpertise on virology and emerging epidemicsUnderstanding behavioural responses to epidemicsGreater understanding of contact patterns and infectionExpertise in quantitative livestock modellingEnvironmental health and engineering expertiseMathematical modelling of epidemicsEconomic modelling of health threatsSpecialism in modelling interactions between socio-economic and ecological systems
Impact The ESEI grant application HAZARD: Human Aspects of Zoonotic and Related Diseases. This was explicitly multidisciplinary involving academic expertise from psychology, environmental microbiology and engineering, livestock epidemiology and economics, veterinary science, medicine and anthropology, alongside a complementary group of policy makers and stakeholders,.
Start Year 2011
 
Description Major ESEI grant application 
Organisation London School of Economics and Political Science (University of London)
Department Centre for Philosophy of Natural and Social Science (CPNSS)
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I led a large application through the ESEI mechanism for a grant entitled "HAZARD: Human Aspects of Zoonotic and Related Diseases". The partners on this application were the core group from the catalyst project plus most our other partners, plus new team members. Contributors in the catalyst project allowed us access to data and facilities (e.g. through site visits and significant intellectual input) as well as further networking opportunities to expand our network in preparation for the ESEI application
Collaborator Contribution Expertise on risk assessments of influenza transmissionExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission in the workplaceAccess to pet owners via vet practicesAccess to veterinary practicesExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission in city farms and access to facilities for the projectStakeholder advice on zoonotic threatExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission when walkingExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission on farmsAdvises on current data and future changes in farming practice and land useVeterinarian expertiseContribute to analysis of risk environmentsEvaluation of hygiene interventionsExpertise on virology and emerging epidemicsUnderstanding behavioural responses to epidemicsGreater understanding of contact patterns and infectionExpertise in quantitative livestock modellingEnvironmental health and engineering expertiseMathematical modelling of epidemicsEconomic modelling of health threatsSpecialism in modelling interactions between socio-economic and ecological systems
Impact The ESEI grant application HAZARD: Human Aspects of Zoonotic and Related Diseases. This was explicitly multidisciplinary involving academic expertise from psychology, environmental microbiology and engineering, livestock epidemiology and economics, veterinary science, medicine and anthropology, alongside a complementary group of policy makers and stakeholders,.
Start Year 2011
 
Description Major ESEI grant application 
Organisation London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM)
Department Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I led a large application through the ESEI mechanism for a grant entitled "HAZARD: Human Aspects of Zoonotic and Related Diseases". The partners on this application were the core group from the catalyst project plus most our other partners, plus new team members. Contributors in the catalyst project allowed us access to data and facilities (e.g. through site visits and significant intellectual input) as well as further networking opportunities to expand our network in preparation for the ESEI application
Collaborator Contribution Expertise on risk assessments of influenza transmissionExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission in the workplaceAccess to pet owners via vet practicesAccess to veterinary practicesExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission in city farms and access to facilities for the projectStakeholder advice on zoonotic threatExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission when walkingExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission on farmsAdvises on current data and future changes in farming practice and land useVeterinarian expertiseContribute to analysis of risk environmentsEvaluation of hygiene interventionsExpertise on virology and emerging epidemicsUnderstanding behavioural responses to epidemicsGreater understanding of contact patterns and infectionExpertise in quantitative livestock modellingEnvironmental health and engineering expertiseMathematical modelling of epidemicsEconomic modelling of health threatsSpecialism in modelling interactions between socio-economic and ecological systems
Impact The ESEI grant application HAZARD: Human Aspects of Zoonotic and Related Diseases. This was explicitly multidisciplinary involving academic expertise from psychology, environmental microbiology and engineering, livestock epidemiology and economics, veterinary science, medicine and anthropology, alongside a complementary group of policy makers and stakeholders,.
Start Year 2011
 
Description Major ESEI grant application 
Organisation London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM)
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I led a large application through the ESEI mechanism for a grant entitled "HAZARD: Human Aspects of Zoonotic and Related Diseases". The partners on this application were the core group from the catalyst project plus most our other partners, plus new team members. Contributors in the catalyst project allowed us access to data and facilities (e.g. through site visits and significant intellectual input) as well as further networking opportunities to expand our network in preparation for the ESEI application
Collaborator Contribution Expertise on risk assessments of influenza transmissionExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission in the workplaceAccess to pet owners via vet practicesAccess to veterinary practicesExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission in city farms and access to facilities for the projectStakeholder advice on zoonotic threatExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission when walkingExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission on farmsAdvises on current data and future changes in farming practice and land useVeterinarian expertiseContribute to analysis of risk environmentsEvaluation of hygiene interventionsExpertise on virology and emerging epidemicsUnderstanding behavioural responses to epidemicsGreater understanding of contact patterns and infectionExpertise in quantitative livestock modellingEnvironmental health and engineering expertiseMathematical modelling of epidemicsEconomic modelling of health threatsSpecialism in modelling interactions between socio-economic and ecological systems
Impact The ESEI grant application HAZARD: Human Aspects of Zoonotic and Related Diseases. This was explicitly multidisciplinary involving academic expertise from psychology, environmental microbiology and engineering, livestock epidemiology and economics, veterinary science, medicine and anthropology, alongside a complementary group of policy makers and stakeholders,.
Start Year 2011
 
Description Major ESEI grant application 
Organisation Minster Vets
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution I led a large application through the ESEI mechanism for a grant entitled "HAZARD: Human Aspects of Zoonotic and Related Diseases". The partners on this application were the core group from the catalyst project plus most our other partners, plus new team members. Contributors in the catalyst project allowed us access to data and facilities (e.g. through site visits and significant intellectual input) as well as further networking opportunities to expand our network in preparation for the ESEI application
Collaborator Contribution Expertise on risk assessments of influenza transmissionExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission in the workplaceAccess to pet owners via vet practicesAccess to veterinary practicesExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission in city farms and access to facilities for the projectStakeholder advice on zoonotic threatExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission when walkingExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission on farmsAdvises on current data and future changes in farming practice and land useVeterinarian expertiseContribute to analysis of risk environmentsEvaluation of hygiene interventionsExpertise on virology and emerging epidemicsUnderstanding behavioural responses to epidemicsGreater understanding of contact patterns and infectionExpertise in quantitative livestock modellingEnvironmental health and engineering expertiseMathematical modelling of epidemicsEconomic modelling of health threatsSpecialism in modelling interactions between socio-economic and ecological systems
Impact The ESEI grant application HAZARD: Human Aspects of Zoonotic and Related Diseases. This was explicitly multidisciplinary involving academic expertise from psychology, environmental microbiology and engineering, livestock epidemiology and economics, veterinary science, medicine and anthropology, alongside a complementary group of policy makers and stakeholders,.
Start Year 2011
 
Description Major ESEI grant application 
Organisation National Farmers Union NFU
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution I led a large application through the ESEI mechanism for a grant entitled "HAZARD: Human Aspects of Zoonotic and Related Diseases". The partners on this application were the core group from the catalyst project plus most our other partners, plus new team members. Contributors in the catalyst project allowed us access to data and facilities (e.g. through site visits and significant intellectual input) as well as further networking opportunities to expand our network in preparation for the ESEI application
Collaborator Contribution Expertise on risk assessments of influenza transmissionExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission in the workplaceAccess to pet owners via vet practicesAccess to veterinary practicesExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission in city farms and access to facilities for the projectStakeholder advice on zoonotic threatExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission when walkingExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission on farmsAdvises on current data and future changes in farming practice and land useVeterinarian expertiseContribute to analysis of risk environmentsEvaluation of hygiene interventionsExpertise on virology and emerging epidemicsUnderstanding behavioural responses to epidemicsGreater understanding of contact patterns and infectionExpertise in quantitative livestock modellingEnvironmental health and engineering expertiseMathematical modelling of epidemicsEconomic modelling of health threatsSpecialism in modelling interactions between socio-economic and ecological systems
Impact The ESEI grant application HAZARD: Human Aspects of Zoonotic and Related Diseases. This was explicitly multidisciplinary involving academic expertise from psychology, environmental microbiology and engineering, livestock epidemiology and economics, veterinary science, medicine and anthropology, alongside a complementary group of policy makers and stakeholders,.
Start Year 2011
 
Description Major ESEI grant application 
Organisation Public Health England (formerly: Health Protection Agency)
Department Centre for Infections (CFI)
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution I led a large application through the ESEI mechanism for a grant entitled "HAZARD: Human Aspects of Zoonotic and Related Diseases". The partners on this application were the core group from the catalyst project plus most our other partners, plus new team members. Contributors in the catalyst project allowed us access to data and facilities (e.g. through site visits and significant intellectual input) as well as further networking opportunities to expand our network in preparation for the ESEI application
Collaborator Contribution Expertise on risk assessments of influenza transmissionExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission in the workplaceAccess to pet owners via vet practicesAccess to veterinary practicesExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission in city farms and access to facilities for the projectStakeholder advice on zoonotic threatExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission when walkingExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission on farmsAdvises on current data and future changes in farming practice and land useVeterinarian expertiseContribute to analysis of risk environmentsEvaluation of hygiene interventionsExpertise on virology and emerging epidemicsUnderstanding behavioural responses to epidemicsGreater understanding of contact patterns and infectionExpertise in quantitative livestock modellingEnvironmental health and engineering expertiseMathematical modelling of epidemicsEconomic modelling of health threatsSpecialism in modelling interactions between socio-economic and ecological systems
Impact The ESEI grant application HAZARD: Human Aspects of Zoonotic and Related Diseases. This was explicitly multidisciplinary involving academic expertise from psychology, environmental microbiology and engineering, livestock epidemiology and economics, veterinary science, medicine and anthropology, alongside a complementary group of policy makers and stakeholders,.
Start Year 2011
 
Description Major ESEI grant application 
Organisation Ramblers Association
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution I led a large application through the ESEI mechanism for a grant entitled "HAZARD: Human Aspects of Zoonotic and Related Diseases". The partners on this application were the core group from the catalyst project plus most our other partners, plus new team members. Contributors in the catalyst project allowed us access to data and facilities (e.g. through site visits and significant intellectual input) as well as further networking opportunities to expand our network in preparation for the ESEI application
Collaborator Contribution Expertise on risk assessments of influenza transmissionExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission in the workplaceAccess to pet owners via vet practicesAccess to veterinary practicesExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission in city farms and access to facilities for the projectStakeholder advice on zoonotic threatExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission when walkingExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission on farmsAdvises on current data and future changes in farming practice and land useVeterinarian expertiseContribute to analysis of risk environmentsEvaluation of hygiene interventionsExpertise on virology and emerging epidemicsUnderstanding behavioural responses to epidemicsGreater understanding of contact patterns and infectionExpertise in quantitative livestock modellingEnvironmental health and engineering expertiseMathematical modelling of epidemicsEconomic modelling of health threatsSpecialism in modelling interactions between socio-economic and ecological systems
Impact The ESEI grant application HAZARD: Human Aspects of Zoonotic and Related Diseases. This was explicitly multidisciplinary involving academic expertise from psychology, environmental microbiology and engineering, livestock epidemiology and economics, veterinary science, medicine and anthropology, alongside a complementary group of policy makers and stakeholders,.
Start Year 2011
 
Description Major ESEI grant application 
Organisation Rare Breeds Survival Trust (RBST)
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution I led a large application through the ESEI mechanism for a grant entitled "HAZARD: Human Aspects of Zoonotic and Related Diseases". The partners on this application were the core group from the catalyst project plus most our other partners, plus new team members. Contributors in the catalyst project allowed us access to data and facilities (e.g. through site visits and significant intellectual input) as well as further networking opportunities to expand our network in preparation for the ESEI application
Collaborator Contribution Expertise on risk assessments of influenza transmissionExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission in the workplaceAccess to pet owners via vet practicesAccess to veterinary practicesExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission in city farms and access to facilities for the projectStakeholder advice on zoonotic threatExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission when walkingExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission on farmsAdvises on current data and future changes in farming practice and land useVeterinarian expertiseContribute to analysis of risk environmentsEvaluation of hygiene interventionsExpertise on virology and emerging epidemicsUnderstanding behavioural responses to epidemicsGreater understanding of contact patterns and infectionExpertise in quantitative livestock modellingEnvironmental health and engineering expertiseMathematical modelling of epidemicsEconomic modelling of health threatsSpecialism in modelling interactions between socio-economic and ecological systems
Impact The ESEI grant application HAZARD: Human Aspects of Zoonotic and Related Diseases. This was explicitly multidisciplinary involving academic expertise from psychology, environmental microbiology and engineering, livestock epidemiology and economics, veterinary science, medicine and anthropology, alongside a complementary group of policy makers and stakeholders,.
Start Year 2011
 
Description Major ESEI grant application 
Organisation Spitafields City Farm
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution I led a large application through the ESEI mechanism for a grant entitled "HAZARD: Human Aspects of Zoonotic and Related Diseases". The partners on this application were the core group from the catalyst project plus most our other partners, plus new team members. Contributors in the catalyst project allowed us access to data and facilities (e.g. through site visits and significant intellectual input) as well as further networking opportunities to expand our network in preparation for the ESEI application
Collaborator Contribution Expertise on risk assessments of influenza transmissionExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission in the workplaceAccess to pet owners via vet practicesAccess to veterinary practicesExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission in city farms and access to facilities for the projectStakeholder advice on zoonotic threatExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission when walkingExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission on farmsAdvises on current data and future changes in farming practice and land useVeterinarian expertiseContribute to analysis of risk environmentsEvaluation of hygiene interventionsExpertise on virology and emerging epidemicsUnderstanding behavioural responses to epidemicsGreater understanding of contact patterns and infectionExpertise in quantitative livestock modellingEnvironmental health and engineering expertiseMathematical modelling of epidemicsEconomic modelling of health threatsSpecialism in modelling interactions between socio-economic and ecological systems
Impact The ESEI grant application HAZARD: Human Aspects of Zoonotic and Related Diseases. This was explicitly multidisciplinary involving academic expertise from psychology, environmental microbiology and engineering, livestock epidemiology and economics, veterinary science, medicine and anthropology, alongside a complementary group of policy makers and stakeholders,.
Start Year 2011
 
Description Major ESEI grant application 
Organisation Transport for London
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution I led a large application through the ESEI mechanism for a grant entitled "HAZARD: Human Aspects of Zoonotic and Related Diseases". The partners on this application were the core group from the catalyst project plus most our other partners, plus new team members. Contributors in the catalyst project allowed us access to data and facilities (e.g. through site visits and significant intellectual input) as well as further networking opportunities to expand our network in preparation for the ESEI application
Collaborator Contribution Expertise on risk assessments of influenza transmissionExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission in the workplaceAccess to pet owners via vet practicesAccess to veterinary practicesExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission in city farms and access to facilities for the projectStakeholder advice on zoonotic threatExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission when walkingExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission on farmsAdvises on current data and future changes in farming practice and land useVeterinarian expertiseContribute to analysis of risk environmentsEvaluation of hygiene interventionsExpertise on virology and emerging epidemicsUnderstanding behavioural responses to epidemicsGreater understanding of contact patterns and infectionExpertise in quantitative livestock modellingEnvironmental health and engineering expertiseMathematical modelling of epidemicsEconomic modelling of health threatsSpecialism in modelling interactions between socio-economic and ecological systems
Impact The ESEI grant application HAZARD: Human Aspects of Zoonotic and Related Diseases. This was explicitly multidisciplinary involving academic expertise from psychology, environmental microbiology and engineering, livestock epidemiology and economics, veterinary science, medicine and anthropology, alongside a complementary group of policy makers and stakeholders,.
Start Year 2011
 
Description Major ESEI grant application 
Organisation University College London (UCL)
Department UCL Engineering Sciences
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I led a large application through the ESEI mechanism for a grant entitled "HAZARD: Human Aspects of Zoonotic and Related Diseases". The partners on this application were the core group from the catalyst project plus most our other partners, plus new team members. Contributors in the catalyst project allowed us access to data and facilities (e.g. through site visits and significant intellectual input) as well as further networking opportunities to expand our network in preparation for the ESEI application
Collaborator Contribution Expertise on risk assessments of influenza transmissionExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission in the workplaceAccess to pet owners via vet practicesAccess to veterinary practicesExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission in city farms and access to facilities for the projectStakeholder advice on zoonotic threatExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission when walkingExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission on farmsAdvises on current data and future changes in farming practice and land useVeterinarian expertiseContribute to analysis of risk environmentsEvaluation of hygiene interventionsExpertise on virology and emerging epidemicsUnderstanding behavioural responses to epidemicsGreater understanding of contact patterns and infectionExpertise in quantitative livestock modellingEnvironmental health and engineering expertiseMathematical modelling of epidemicsEconomic modelling of health threatsSpecialism in modelling interactions between socio-economic and ecological systems
Impact The ESEI grant application HAZARD: Human Aspects of Zoonotic and Related Diseases. This was explicitly multidisciplinary involving academic expertise from psychology, environmental microbiology and engineering, livestock epidemiology and economics, veterinary science, medicine and anthropology, alongside a complementary group of policy makers and stakeholders,.
Start Year 2011
 
Description Major ESEI grant application 
Organisation University College London (UCL)
Department UCL Institute of Epidemiology and Health Care
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I led a large application through the ESEI mechanism for a grant entitled "HAZARD: Human Aspects of Zoonotic and Related Diseases". The partners on this application were the core group from the catalyst project plus most our other partners, plus new team members. Contributors in the catalyst project allowed us access to data and facilities (e.g. through site visits and significant intellectual input) as well as further networking opportunities to expand our network in preparation for the ESEI application
Collaborator Contribution Expertise on risk assessments of influenza transmissionExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission in the workplaceAccess to pet owners via vet practicesAccess to veterinary practicesExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission in city farms and access to facilities for the projectStakeholder advice on zoonotic threatExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission when walkingExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission on farmsAdvises on current data and future changes in farming practice and land useVeterinarian expertiseContribute to analysis of risk environmentsEvaluation of hygiene interventionsExpertise on virology and emerging epidemicsUnderstanding behavioural responses to epidemicsGreater understanding of contact patterns and infectionExpertise in quantitative livestock modellingEnvironmental health and engineering expertiseMathematical modelling of epidemicsEconomic modelling of health threatsSpecialism in modelling interactions between socio-economic and ecological systems
Impact The ESEI grant application HAZARD: Human Aspects of Zoonotic and Related Diseases. This was explicitly multidisciplinary involving academic expertise from psychology, environmental microbiology and engineering, livestock epidemiology and economics, veterinary science, medicine and anthropology, alongside a complementary group of policy makers and stakeholders,.
Start Year 2011
 
Description Major ESEI grant application 
Organisation University of Liverpool
Department Institute of Infection and Global Health
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I led a large application through the ESEI mechanism for a grant entitled "HAZARD: Human Aspects of Zoonotic and Related Diseases". The partners on this application were the core group from the catalyst project plus most our other partners, plus new team members. Contributors in the catalyst project allowed us access to data and facilities (e.g. through site visits and significant intellectual input) as well as further networking opportunities to expand our network in preparation for the ESEI application
Collaborator Contribution Expertise on risk assessments of influenza transmissionExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission in the workplaceAccess to pet owners via vet practicesAccess to veterinary practicesExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission in city farms and access to facilities for the projectStakeholder advice on zoonotic threatExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission when walkingExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission on farmsAdvises on current data and future changes in farming practice and land useVeterinarian expertiseContribute to analysis of risk environmentsEvaluation of hygiene interventionsExpertise on virology and emerging epidemicsUnderstanding behavioural responses to epidemicsGreater understanding of contact patterns and infectionExpertise in quantitative livestock modellingEnvironmental health and engineering expertiseMathematical modelling of epidemicsEconomic modelling of health threatsSpecialism in modelling interactions between socio-economic and ecological systems
Impact The ESEI grant application HAZARD: Human Aspects of Zoonotic and Related Diseases. This was explicitly multidisciplinary involving academic expertise from psychology, environmental microbiology and engineering, livestock epidemiology and economics, veterinary science, medicine and anthropology, alongside a complementary group of policy makers and stakeholders,.
Start Year 2011
 
Description Major ESEI grant application 
Organisation University of Reading
Department School of Agriculture, Policy and Development Reading
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I led a large application through the ESEI mechanism for a grant entitled "HAZARD: Human Aspects of Zoonotic and Related Diseases". The partners on this application were the core group from the catalyst project plus most our other partners, plus new team members. Contributors in the catalyst project allowed us access to data and facilities (e.g. through site visits and significant intellectual input) as well as further networking opportunities to expand our network in preparation for the ESEI application
Collaborator Contribution Expertise on risk assessments of influenza transmissionExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission in the workplaceAccess to pet owners via vet practicesAccess to veterinary practicesExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission in city farms and access to facilities for the projectStakeholder advice on zoonotic threatExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission when walkingExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission on farmsAdvises on current data and future changes in farming practice and land useVeterinarian expertiseContribute to analysis of risk environmentsEvaluation of hygiene interventionsExpertise on virology and emerging epidemicsUnderstanding behavioural responses to epidemicsGreater understanding of contact patterns and infectionExpertise in quantitative livestock modellingEnvironmental health and engineering expertiseMathematical modelling of epidemicsEconomic modelling of health threatsSpecialism in modelling interactions between socio-economic and ecological systems
Impact The ESEI grant application HAZARD: Human Aspects of Zoonotic and Related Diseases. This was explicitly multidisciplinary involving academic expertise from psychology, environmental microbiology and engineering, livestock epidemiology and economics, veterinary science, medicine and anthropology, alongside a complementary group of policy makers and stakeholders,.
Start Year 2011
 
Description Major ESEI grant application 
Organisation University of Warwick
Department Mathematics Institute Warwick
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I led a large application through the ESEI mechanism for a grant entitled "HAZARD: Human Aspects of Zoonotic and Related Diseases". The partners on this application were the core group from the catalyst project plus most our other partners, plus new team members. Contributors in the catalyst project allowed us access to data and facilities (e.g. through site visits and significant intellectual input) as well as further networking opportunities to expand our network in preparation for the ESEI application
Collaborator Contribution Expertise on risk assessments of influenza transmissionExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission in the workplaceAccess to pet owners via vet practicesAccess to veterinary practicesExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission in city farms and access to facilities for the projectStakeholder advice on zoonotic threatExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission when walkingExpertise on zoonotic disease transmission on farmsAdvises on current data and future changes in farming practice and land useVeterinarian expertiseContribute to analysis of risk environmentsEvaluation of hygiene interventionsExpertise on virology and emerging epidemicsUnderstanding behavioural responses to epidemicsGreater understanding of contact patterns and infectionExpertise in quantitative livestock modellingEnvironmental health and engineering expertiseMathematical modelling of epidemicsEconomic modelling of health threatsSpecialism in modelling interactions between socio-economic and ecological systems
Impact The ESEI grant application HAZARD: Human Aspects of Zoonotic and Related Diseases. This was explicitly multidisciplinary involving academic expertise from psychology, environmental microbiology and engineering, livestock epidemiology and economics, veterinary science, medicine and anthropology, alongside a complementary group of policy makers and stakeholders,.
Start Year 2011
 
Description New grant application to NIHR 
Organisation Brunel University
Department School of Health Sciences and Social Care
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Worked with Dr Read and Prof Myers on NIHR infectious diseases grant application. Both provided significant intellectual input: Dr Read provided additional access to existing databases required for the application and access to further expertise included in the application
Collaborator Contribution Important insights into epidemiological work on influenza and other transmissable disease. Insight into the health psychology research on influenza and modelling health risks
Impact NIHR grant application (preliminary phase). Disciplines of epidemiology and health psychology (multidsciplinary).
Start Year 2011
 
Description New grant application to NIHR 
Organisation University of Liverpool
Department Institute of Infection and Global Health
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Worked with Dr Read and Prof Myers on NIHR infectious diseases grant application. Both provided significant intellectual input: Dr Read provided additional access to existing databases required for the application and access to further expertise included in the application
Collaborator Contribution Important insights into epidemiological work on influenza and other transmissable disease. Insight into the health psychology research on influenza and modelling health risks
Impact NIHR grant application (preliminary phase). Disciplines of epidemiology and health psychology (multidsciplinary).
Start Year 2011
 
Description Presentation at FERA internal conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Type Of Presentation Poster Presentation
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/parliamentarians
Results and Impact A poster based on our journal paper (in press) was presented at the FERA 2nd Science Conference.

Paper due to be presented in the next month
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012