Host determinants of malarial pathogenesis [Professorship award]

Lead Research Organisation: University of Oxford
Department Name: Paediatrics

Abstract

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Technical Summary

Host determinants of malarial pathogenesis

Organisations


Publications


10 25 50
 
Description Advanced courses in genomic epidemiology
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
 
Description Head of Informatics, Worldwide Antimalarial Resistance Network
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Participation in advisory committee
 
Description MalariaGEN Data Fellowship scheme
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
 
Description MalariaGEN policies for data sharing
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Citation in other policy documents
 
Description BMGF Global Health Award
Amount $2,994,801 (USD)
Funding ID OPP1040463 
Organisation Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United States of America
Start 11/2011 
End 07/2014
 
Description Grand Challenges in Global Health initiative
Amount £6,000,000 (GBP)
Organisation Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United States of America
Start 09/2005 
End 06/2013
 
Description Grand Challenges in Global Health initiative
Amount £6,000,000 (GBP)
Organisation The Wellcome Trust Ltd 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK)
Start 09/2005 
End 06/2010
 
Description MRC Programme Grant
Amount £1,500,000 (GBP)
Organisation Medical Research Council (MRC) 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK)
Start 09/2006 
End 03/2011
 
Description Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute Malaria Programme
Amount £10,000,000 (GBP)
Organisation The Wellcome Trust Ltd 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK)
Start 09/2011 
End 09/2016
 
Description Wellcome Trust Strategic Award
Amount £6,000,000 (GBP)
Organisation The Wellcome Trust Ltd 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK)
Start 11/2010 
End 11/2015
 
Title ExplorerCat 
Description ExplorerCat is a user-friendly web application that allows researchers without informatics skills to query and browse complex population genomic databases, e.g. to search through large catalogues of genetic variants for those with high levels of population differentiation or haplotypic signatures of recent positive selection. See http://www.sanger.ac.uk/MapSeqExplorerCat/ 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2010 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact ExplorerCat has been used to release the first global survey of regional allele frequencies for ~100,000 SNPs in the Plasmodium falciparum genome. 
URL http://www.sanger.ac.uk/MapSeqExplorerCat/
 
Title Genomewide association studies of malaria in The Gambia, Ghana and Malawi 
Description Data submitted to European Genotyping Archive. Any bona fide researcher may apply for access via an Independent Data Access committee. 
Type Of Material Biological samples 
Year Produced 2009 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact First genomewide association study performed in Africa. Papers in Nature Genetics and Nature Reviews Genetics. Development of an ethical policy for GWAS data release, in consultation with stakeholders in developing countries, published in Nature and PLoS Medicine. 
 
Title High throughput genotyping methods 
Description We have developed and implemented mass-spec based methods for cost-effective SNP genotyping of 10,000's of samples from poor-quality samples from multicentre studies in Africa. 
Type Of Material Technology assay or reagent 
Year Produced 2007 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact It has allowed us to provide genetic data on >100,000 samples for partners in >20 countries 
 
Title Illuminus 
Description Genotype calling algorithm for genome-wide SNP typing, published in Bioinformatics and available as open source software 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2008 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact Over the past 3 years, Illuminus has been one of the most popular genotype-calling algorithms used in GWAS studies. 
 
Title LookSeq 
Description An interactive web viewer for browsing large volumes of next-generation sequencing data, published in Genome Research and released as open-source software. 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2009 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact We developed LookSeq initially for the malaria research community. It has been adopted and adapted by the Mouse Genome sequencing community and other groups. 
 
Title MalariaGEN Consortial Resource 
Description A repository of >100,000 DNA samples with detailed clinical data, collected by researchers in over 20 malaria endemic countries, for global multicentre studies of human resistance to malaria, parasite resistance to anti-malarial drugs, and mosquito resistance to insecticides. 
Type Of Material Biological samples 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact Development of ethical policies and procedures for global data-sharing networks involving rich and poor countries (published in Nature and elsewhere); GWAS studies of >20,000 individuals (published in Nature Genetics and work in progress); a capacity-building initiative that has trained researchers in 16 malaria endemic countries in data analysis & statistics. 
 
Title MapSeq 
Description MapSeq is a web-based application designed to link deep genome sequencing to epidemiology, allowing exploration of genetic variation data in the context of geographical distributions and other phenotypic associations. MapSeq stores and manages genomic data from large numbers of samples, and presents this data in forms that make it easier to discern patterns and explore hypotheses. 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2009 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact See www.mapseq.net/pf Featured in WIRED, Scientific American. 
URL http://www.mapseq.net/pf
 
Title SnoopCGH 
Description Web-based visualization of comparative genome hybridisation data, published in Bioinformatics and available as open-source software. 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2009 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact
 
Title Web applications for a global data-sharing network 
Description User-friendly web applications for sharing large and datasets between researchers in rich and poor countries. 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2006 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact Underpins MalariaGEN data-sharing network 
 
Title Web applications for genomic epidemiology 
Description User-friendly web applications for browsing and querying large genetic epidemiology databases 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2006 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact Underpins the MalariaGEN data-sharing network 
 
Description Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network (MalariaGEN) 
Organisation Centre Muraz
Country Burkina Faso 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I direct the MalariaGEN Resource Centre (http://www.malariagen.net/). CGGH supports Resource Centre activities, particularly statistics, software engineering, and ethics.
Collaborator Contribution MalariaGEN - the Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network - is a community of more than 100 researchers in 30 countries, working together on projects that require sharing and integration of large amounts of data. MalariaGEN brings together the work of many different partner studies, each of which is led by an independent investigator and has its own scientific objectives. MalariaGEN adds value to partner studies by providing access to genotyping and sequencing technologies, and by providing a framework for sharing and integrating data in consortial and community projects. MalariaGEN provides training and support in genetic data analysis for researchers at partner institutions in malaria-endemic countries. We do this through a data bursary scheme and through an active programme of scientific meetings and training workshops. These activities are supported by the MalariaGEN Resource Centre which has a team of experts in statistics, population genetics and bioinformatics at the Sanger Institute, Oxford University, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and Mahidol University in Bangkok. There are many practical and ethical challenges involved in sharing data across a global network comprising investigators and institutions with great disparities in funding and infrastructure. The MalariaGEN community has been working to develop transparent procedures for ethics and governance. We have a governance committee and an independent data access committee, and network policies have been defined for data sharing and data access.
Impact See www.malariagen.net. Outputs are given in more detail in G0600718B. They include the development of the major global repository of samples and data for genomic epidemiology studies of malaria; and large-scale GWAS and genome sequencing data generation for host, parasite and vector. Examples relevant to this grant: 1. The world's largest repository of DNA samples and clinical data for genetic studies of host-parasite interactions in malaria 2. Publication of the first genome-wide association study of human disease susceptibility in Africa 3. A large multicentre case-control study of severe malaria, representing the largest ongoing genome-wide association study of an infectious disease. In December 2011 we completed genotyping of >1 million SNPs on >20,000 individuals from 10 different populations.
 
Description Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network (MalariaGEN) 
Organisation Hospital for Tropical Diseases HCM
Department Oxford University Clinical Research Unit in Viet Nam (OUCRU)
Country Vietnam, Socialist Republic of 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I direct the MalariaGEN Resource Centre (http://www.malariagen.net/). CGGH supports Resource Centre activities, particularly statistics, software engineering, and ethics.
Collaborator Contribution MalariaGEN - the Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network - is a community of more than 100 researchers in 30 countries, working together on projects that require sharing and integration of large amounts of data. MalariaGEN brings together the work of many different partner studies, each of which is led by an independent investigator and has its own scientific objectives. MalariaGEN adds value to partner studies by providing access to genotyping and sequencing technologies, and by providing a framework for sharing and integrating data in consortial and community projects. MalariaGEN provides training and support in genetic data analysis for researchers at partner institutions in malaria-endemic countries. We do this through a data bursary scheme and through an active programme of scientific meetings and training workshops. These activities are supported by the MalariaGEN Resource Centre which has a team of experts in statistics, population genetics and bioinformatics at the Sanger Institute, Oxford University, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and Mahidol University in Bangkok. There are many practical and ethical challenges involved in sharing data across a global network comprising investigators and institutions with great disparities in funding and infrastructure. The MalariaGEN community has been working to develop transparent procedures for ethics and governance. We have a governance committee and an independent data access committee, and network policies have been defined for data sharing and data access.
Impact See www.malariagen.net. Outputs are given in more detail in G0600718B. They include the development of the major global repository of samples and data for genomic epidemiology studies of malaria; and large-scale GWAS and genome sequencing data generation for host, parasite and vector. Examples relevant to this grant: 1. The world's largest repository of DNA samples and clinical data for genetic studies of host-parasite interactions in malaria 2. Publication of the first genome-wide association study of human disease susceptibility in Africa 3. A large multicentre case-control study of severe malaria, representing the largest ongoing genome-wide association study of an infectious disease. In December 2011 we completed genotyping of >1 million SNPs on >20,000 individuals from 10 different populations.
 
Description Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network (MalariaGEN) 
Organisation Institute for Endemic Diseases IEND
Country Sudan, Republic of 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I direct the MalariaGEN Resource Centre (http://www.malariagen.net/). CGGH supports Resource Centre activities, particularly statistics, software engineering, and ethics.
Collaborator Contribution MalariaGEN - the Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network - is a community of more than 100 researchers in 30 countries, working together on projects that require sharing and integration of large amounts of data. MalariaGEN brings together the work of many different partner studies, each of which is led by an independent investigator and has its own scientific objectives. MalariaGEN adds value to partner studies by providing access to genotyping and sequencing technologies, and by providing a framework for sharing and integrating data in consortial and community projects. MalariaGEN provides training and support in genetic data analysis for researchers at partner institutions in malaria-endemic countries. We do this through a data bursary scheme and through an active programme of scientific meetings and training workshops. These activities are supported by the MalariaGEN Resource Centre which has a team of experts in statistics, population genetics and bioinformatics at the Sanger Institute, Oxford University, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and Mahidol University in Bangkok. There are many practical and ethical challenges involved in sharing data across a global network comprising investigators and institutions with great disparities in funding and infrastructure. The MalariaGEN community has been working to develop transparent procedures for ethics and governance. We have a governance committee and an independent data access committee, and network policies have been defined for data sharing and data access.
Impact See www.malariagen.net. Outputs are given in more detail in G0600718B. They include the development of the major global repository of samples and data for genomic epidemiology studies of malaria; and large-scale GWAS and genome sequencing data generation for host, parasite and vector. Examples relevant to this grant: 1. The world's largest repository of DNA samples and clinical data for genetic studies of host-parasite interactions in malaria 2. Publication of the first genome-wide association study of human disease susceptibility in Africa 3. A large multicentre case-control study of severe malaria, representing the largest ongoing genome-wide association study of an infectious disease. In December 2011 we completed genotyping of >1 million SNPs on >20,000 individuals from 10 different populations.
 
Description Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network (MalariaGEN) 
Organisation Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST)
Country Ghana, Republic of 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I direct the MalariaGEN Resource Centre (http://www.malariagen.net/). CGGH supports Resource Centre activities, particularly statistics, software engineering, and ethics.
Collaborator Contribution MalariaGEN - the Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network - is a community of more than 100 researchers in 30 countries, working together on projects that require sharing and integration of large amounts of data. MalariaGEN brings together the work of many different partner studies, each of which is led by an independent investigator and has its own scientific objectives. MalariaGEN adds value to partner studies by providing access to genotyping and sequencing technologies, and by providing a framework for sharing and integrating data in consortial and community projects. MalariaGEN provides training and support in genetic data analysis for researchers at partner institutions in malaria-endemic countries. We do this through a data bursary scheme and through an active programme of scientific meetings and training workshops. These activities are supported by the MalariaGEN Resource Centre which has a team of experts in statistics, population genetics and bioinformatics at the Sanger Institute, Oxford University, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and Mahidol University in Bangkok. There are many practical and ethical challenges involved in sharing data across a global network comprising investigators and institutions with great disparities in funding and infrastructure. The MalariaGEN community has been working to develop transparent procedures for ethics and governance. We have a governance committee and an independent data access committee, and network policies have been defined for data sharing and data access.
Impact See www.malariagen.net. Outputs are given in more detail in G0600718B. They include the development of the major global repository of samples and data for genomic epidemiology studies of malaria; and large-scale GWAS and genome sequencing data generation for host, parasite and vector. Examples relevant to this grant: 1. The world's largest repository of DNA samples and clinical data for genetic studies of host-parasite interactions in malaria 2. Publication of the first genome-wide association study of human disease susceptibility in Africa 3. A large multicentre case-control study of severe malaria, representing the largest ongoing genome-wide association study of an infectious disease. In December 2011 we completed genotyping of >1 million SNPs on >20,000 individuals from 10 different populations.
 
Description Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network (MalariaGEN) 
Organisation Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I direct the MalariaGEN Resource Centre (http://www.malariagen.net/). CGGH supports Resource Centre activities, particularly statistics, software engineering, and ethics.
Collaborator Contribution MalariaGEN - the Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network - is a community of more than 100 researchers in 30 countries, working together on projects that require sharing and integration of large amounts of data. MalariaGEN brings together the work of many different partner studies, each of which is led by an independent investigator and has its own scientific objectives. MalariaGEN adds value to partner studies by providing access to genotyping and sequencing technologies, and by providing a framework for sharing and integrating data in consortial and community projects. MalariaGEN provides training and support in genetic data analysis for researchers at partner institutions in malaria-endemic countries. We do this through a data bursary scheme and through an active programme of scientific meetings and training workshops. These activities are supported by the MalariaGEN Resource Centre which has a team of experts in statistics, population genetics and bioinformatics at the Sanger Institute, Oxford University, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and Mahidol University in Bangkok. There are many practical and ethical challenges involved in sharing data across a global network comprising investigators and institutions with great disparities in funding and infrastructure. The MalariaGEN community has been working to develop transparent procedures for ethics and governance. We have a governance committee and an independent data access committee, and network policies have been defined for data sharing and data access.
Impact See www.malariagen.net. Outputs are given in more detail in G0600718B. They include the development of the major global repository of samples and data for genomic epidemiology studies of malaria; and large-scale GWAS and genome sequencing data generation for host, parasite and vector. Examples relevant to this grant: 1. The world's largest repository of DNA samples and clinical data for genetic studies of host-parasite interactions in malaria 2. Publication of the first genome-wide association study of human disease susceptibility in Africa 3. A large multicentre case-control study of severe malaria, representing the largest ongoing genome-wide association study of an infectious disease. In December 2011 we completed genotyping of >1 million SNPs on >20,000 individuals from 10 different populations.
 
Description Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network (MalariaGEN) 
Organisation London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM)
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I direct the MalariaGEN Resource Centre (http://www.malariagen.net/). CGGH supports Resource Centre activities, particularly statistics, software engineering, and ethics.
Collaborator Contribution MalariaGEN - the Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network - is a community of more than 100 researchers in 30 countries, working together on projects that require sharing and integration of large amounts of data. MalariaGEN brings together the work of many different partner studies, each of which is led by an independent investigator and has its own scientific objectives. MalariaGEN adds value to partner studies by providing access to genotyping and sequencing technologies, and by providing a framework for sharing and integrating data in consortial and community projects. MalariaGEN provides training and support in genetic data analysis for researchers at partner institutions in malaria-endemic countries. We do this through a data bursary scheme and through an active programme of scientific meetings and training workshops. These activities are supported by the MalariaGEN Resource Centre which has a team of experts in statistics, population genetics and bioinformatics at the Sanger Institute, Oxford University, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and Mahidol University in Bangkok. There are many practical and ethical challenges involved in sharing data across a global network comprising investigators and institutions with great disparities in funding and infrastructure. The MalariaGEN community has been working to develop transparent procedures for ethics and governance. We have a governance committee and an independent data access committee, and network policies have been defined for data sharing and data access.
Impact See www.malariagen.net. Outputs are given in more detail in G0600718B. They include the development of the major global repository of samples and data for genomic epidemiology studies of malaria; and large-scale GWAS and genome sequencing data generation for host, parasite and vector. Examples relevant to this grant: 1. The world's largest repository of DNA samples and clinical data for genetic studies of host-parasite interactions in malaria 2. Publication of the first genome-wide association study of human disease susceptibility in Africa 3. A large multicentre case-control study of severe malaria, representing the largest ongoing genome-wide association study of an infectious disease. In December 2011 we completed genotyping of >1 million SNPs on >20,000 individuals from 10 different populations.
 
Description Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network (MalariaGEN) 
Organisation Mahidol University
Country Thailand, Kingdom of 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I direct the MalariaGEN Resource Centre (http://www.malariagen.net/). CGGH supports Resource Centre activities, particularly statistics, software engineering, and ethics.
Collaborator Contribution MalariaGEN - the Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network - is a community of more than 100 researchers in 30 countries, working together on projects that require sharing and integration of large amounts of data. MalariaGEN brings together the work of many different partner studies, each of which is led by an independent investigator and has its own scientific objectives. MalariaGEN adds value to partner studies by providing access to genotyping and sequencing technologies, and by providing a framework for sharing and integrating data in consortial and community projects. MalariaGEN provides training and support in genetic data analysis for researchers at partner institutions in malaria-endemic countries. We do this through a data bursary scheme and through an active programme of scientific meetings and training workshops. These activities are supported by the MalariaGEN Resource Centre which has a team of experts in statistics, population genetics and bioinformatics at the Sanger Institute, Oxford University, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and Mahidol University in Bangkok. There are many practical and ethical challenges involved in sharing data across a global network comprising investigators and institutions with great disparities in funding and infrastructure. The MalariaGEN community has been working to develop transparent procedures for ethics and governance. We have a governance committee and an independent data access committee, and network policies have been defined for data sharing and data access.
Impact See www.malariagen.net. Outputs are given in more detail in G0600718B. They include the development of the major global repository of samples and data for genomic epidemiology studies of malaria; and large-scale GWAS and genome sequencing data generation for host, parasite and vector. Examples relevant to this grant: 1. The world's largest repository of DNA samples and clinical data for genetic studies of host-parasite interactions in malaria 2. Publication of the first genome-wide association study of human disease susceptibility in Africa 3. A large multicentre case-control study of severe malaria, representing the largest ongoing genome-wide association study of an infectious disease. In December 2011 we completed genotyping of >1 million SNPs on >20,000 individuals from 10 different populations.
 
Description Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network (MalariaGEN) 
Organisation Medical Research Council (MRC)
Department MRC Laboratories, The Gambia
Country Gambia, Republic of the 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution I direct the MalariaGEN Resource Centre (http://www.malariagen.net/). CGGH supports Resource Centre activities, particularly statistics, software engineering, and ethics.
Collaborator Contribution MalariaGEN - the Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network - is a community of more than 100 researchers in 30 countries, working together on projects that require sharing and integration of large amounts of data. MalariaGEN brings together the work of many different partner studies, each of which is led by an independent investigator and has its own scientific objectives. MalariaGEN adds value to partner studies by providing access to genotyping and sequencing technologies, and by providing a framework for sharing and integrating data in consortial and community projects. MalariaGEN provides training and support in genetic data analysis for researchers at partner institutions in malaria-endemic countries. We do this through a data bursary scheme and through an active programme of scientific meetings and training workshops. These activities are supported by the MalariaGEN Resource Centre which has a team of experts in statistics, population genetics and bioinformatics at the Sanger Institute, Oxford University, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and Mahidol University in Bangkok. There are many practical and ethical challenges involved in sharing data across a global network comprising investigators and institutions with great disparities in funding and infrastructure. The MalariaGEN community has been working to develop transparent procedures for ethics and governance. We have a governance committee and an independent data access committee, and network policies have been defined for data sharing and data access.
Impact See www.malariagen.net. Outputs are given in more detail in G0600718B. They include the development of the major global repository of samples and data for genomic epidemiology studies of malaria; and large-scale GWAS and genome sequencing data generation for host, parasite and vector. Examples relevant to this grant: 1. The world's largest repository of DNA samples and clinical data for genetic studies of host-parasite interactions in malaria 2. Publication of the first genome-wide association study of human disease susceptibility in Africa 3. A large multicentre case-control study of severe malaria, representing the largest ongoing genome-wide association study of an infectious disease. In December 2011 we completed genotyping of >1 million SNPs on >20,000 individuals from 10 different populations.
 
Description Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network (MalariaGEN) 
Organisation National Institute for Medical Research, Tanzania
Country Tanzania, United Republic of 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution I direct the MalariaGEN Resource Centre (http://www.malariagen.net/). CGGH supports Resource Centre activities, particularly statistics, software engineering, and ethics.
Collaborator Contribution MalariaGEN - the Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network - is a community of more than 100 researchers in 30 countries, working together on projects that require sharing and integration of large amounts of data. MalariaGEN brings together the work of many different partner studies, each of which is led by an independent investigator and has its own scientific objectives. MalariaGEN adds value to partner studies by providing access to genotyping and sequencing technologies, and by providing a framework for sharing and integrating data in consortial and community projects. MalariaGEN provides training and support in genetic data analysis for researchers at partner institutions in malaria-endemic countries. We do this through a data bursary scheme and through an active programme of scientific meetings and training workshops. These activities are supported by the MalariaGEN Resource Centre which has a team of experts in statistics, population genetics and bioinformatics at the Sanger Institute, Oxford University, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and Mahidol University in Bangkok. There are many practical and ethical challenges involved in sharing data across a global network comprising investigators and institutions with great disparities in funding and infrastructure. The MalariaGEN community has been working to develop transparent procedures for ethics and governance. We have a governance committee and an independent data access committee, and network policies have been defined for data sharing and data access.
Impact See www.malariagen.net. Outputs are given in more detail in G0600718B. They include the development of the major global repository of samples and data for genomic epidemiology studies of malaria; and large-scale GWAS and genome sequencing data generation for host, parasite and vector. Examples relevant to this grant: 1. The world's largest repository of DNA samples and clinical data for genetic studies of host-parasite interactions in malaria 2. Publication of the first genome-wide association study of human disease susceptibility in Africa 3. A large multicentre case-control study of severe malaria, representing the largest ongoing genome-wide association study of an infectious disease. In December 2011 we completed genotyping of >1 million SNPs on >20,000 individuals from 10 different populations.
 
Description Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network (MalariaGEN) 
Organisation Noguchi Memorial Institute for Medical Research (NMRR)
Country Ghana, Republic of 
Sector Learned Society 
PI Contribution I direct the MalariaGEN Resource Centre (http://www.malariagen.net/). CGGH supports Resource Centre activities, particularly statistics, software engineering, and ethics.
Collaborator Contribution MalariaGEN - the Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network - is a community of more than 100 researchers in 30 countries, working together on projects that require sharing and integration of large amounts of data. MalariaGEN brings together the work of many different partner studies, each of which is led by an independent investigator and has its own scientific objectives. MalariaGEN adds value to partner studies by providing access to genotyping and sequencing technologies, and by providing a framework for sharing and integrating data in consortial and community projects. MalariaGEN provides training and support in genetic data analysis for researchers at partner institutions in malaria-endemic countries. We do this through a data bursary scheme and through an active programme of scientific meetings and training workshops. These activities are supported by the MalariaGEN Resource Centre which has a team of experts in statistics, population genetics and bioinformatics at the Sanger Institute, Oxford University, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and Mahidol University in Bangkok. There are many practical and ethical challenges involved in sharing data across a global network comprising investigators and institutions with great disparities in funding and infrastructure. The MalariaGEN community has been working to develop transparent procedures for ethics and governance. We have a governance committee and an independent data access committee, and network policies have been defined for data sharing and data access.
Impact See www.malariagen.net. Outputs are given in more detail in G0600718B. They include the development of the major global repository of samples and data for genomic epidemiology studies of malaria; and large-scale GWAS and genome sequencing data generation for host, parasite and vector. Examples relevant to this grant: 1. The world's largest repository of DNA samples and clinical data for genetic studies of host-parasite interactions in malaria 2. Publication of the first genome-wide association study of human disease susceptibility in Africa 3. A large multicentre case-control study of severe malaria, representing the largest ongoing genome-wide association study of an infectious disease. In December 2011 we completed genotyping of >1 million SNPs on >20,000 individuals from 10 different populations.
 
Description Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network (MalariaGEN) 
Organisation Papua New Guinea Institute of Medical Research
Country Papua New Guinea, Independent State of 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution I direct the MalariaGEN Resource Centre (http://www.malariagen.net/). CGGH supports Resource Centre activities, particularly statistics, software engineering, and ethics.
Collaborator Contribution MalariaGEN - the Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network - is a community of more than 100 researchers in 30 countries, working together on projects that require sharing and integration of large amounts of data. MalariaGEN brings together the work of many different partner studies, each of which is led by an independent investigator and has its own scientific objectives. MalariaGEN adds value to partner studies by providing access to genotyping and sequencing technologies, and by providing a framework for sharing and integrating data in consortial and community projects. MalariaGEN provides training and support in genetic data analysis for researchers at partner institutions in malaria-endemic countries. We do this through a data bursary scheme and through an active programme of scientific meetings and training workshops. These activities are supported by the MalariaGEN Resource Centre which has a team of experts in statistics, population genetics and bioinformatics at the Sanger Institute, Oxford University, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and Mahidol University in Bangkok. There are many practical and ethical challenges involved in sharing data across a global network comprising investigators and institutions with great disparities in funding and infrastructure. The MalariaGEN community has been working to develop transparent procedures for ethics and governance. We have a governance committee and an independent data access committee, and network policies have been defined for data sharing and data access.
Impact See www.malariagen.net. Outputs are given in more detail in G0600718B. They include the development of the major global repository of samples and data for genomic epidemiology studies of malaria; and large-scale GWAS and genome sequencing data generation for host, parasite and vector. Examples relevant to this grant: 1. The world's largest repository of DNA samples and clinical data for genetic studies of host-parasite interactions in malaria 2. Publication of the first genome-wide association study of human disease susceptibility in Africa 3. A large multicentre case-control study of severe malaria, representing the largest ongoing genome-wide association study of an infectious disease. In December 2011 we completed genotyping of >1 million SNPs on >20,000 individuals from 10 different populations.
 
Description Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network (MalariaGEN) 
Organisation Pasteur Institute Dakar
Country Senegal, Republic of 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution I direct the MalariaGEN Resource Centre (http://www.malariagen.net/). CGGH supports Resource Centre activities, particularly statistics, software engineering, and ethics.
Collaborator Contribution MalariaGEN - the Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network - is a community of more than 100 researchers in 30 countries, working together on projects that require sharing and integration of large amounts of data. MalariaGEN brings together the work of many different partner studies, each of which is led by an independent investigator and has its own scientific objectives. MalariaGEN adds value to partner studies by providing access to genotyping and sequencing technologies, and by providing a framework for sharing and integrating data in consortial and community projects. MalariaGEN provides training and support in genetic data analysis for researchers at partner institutions in malaria-endemic countries. We do this through a data bursary scheme and through an active programme of scientific meetings and training workshops. These activities are supported by the MalariaGEN Resource Centre which has a team of experts in statistics, population genetics and bioinformatics at the Sanger Institute, Oxford University, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and Mahidol University in Bangkok. There are many practical and ethical challenges involved in sharing data across a global network comprising investigators and institutions with great disparities in funding and infrastructure. The MalariaGEN community has been working to develop transparent procedures for ethics and governance. We have a governance committee and an independent data access committee, and network policies have been defined for data sharing and data access.
Impact See www.malariagen.net. Outputs are given in more detail in G0600718B. They include the development of the major global repository of samples and data for genomic epidemiology studies of malaria; and large-scale GWAS and genome sequencing data generation for host, parasite and vector. Examples relevant to this grant: 1. The world's largest repository of DNA samples and clinical data for genetic studies of host-parasite interactions in malaria 2. Publication of the first genome-wide association study of human disease susceptibility in Africa 3. A large multicentre case-control study of severe malaria, representing the largest ongoing genome-wide association study of an infectious disease. In December 2011 we completed genotyping of >1 million SNPs on >20,000 individuals from 10 different populations.
 
Description Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network (MalariaGEN) 
Organisation Pasteur Institute, Paris
Country France, French Republic 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I direct the MalariaGEN Resource Centre (http://www.malariagen.net/). CGGH supports Resource Centre activities, particularly statistics, software engineering, and ethics.
Collaborator Contribution MalariaGEN - the Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network - is a community of more than 100 researchers in 30 countries, working together on projects that require sharing and integration of large amounts of data. MalariaGEN brings together the work of many different partner studies, each of which is led by an independent investigator and has its own scientific objectives. MalariaGEN adds value to partner studies by providing access to genotyping and sequencing technologies, and by providing a framework for sharing and integrating data in consortial and community projects. MalariaGEN provides training and support in genetic data analysis for researchers at partner institutions in malaria-endemic countries. We do this through a data bursary scheme and through an active programme of scientific meetings and training workshops. These activities are supported by the MalariaGEN Resource Centre which has a team of experts in statistics, population genetics and bioinformatics at the Sanger Institute, Oxford University, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and Mahidol University in Bangkok. There are many practical and ethical challenges involved in sharing data across a global network comprising investigators and institutions with great disparities in funding and infrastructure. The MalariaGEN community has been working to develop transparent procedures for ethics and governance. We have a governance committee and an independent data access committee, and network policies have been defined for data sharing and data access.
Impact See www.malariagen.net. Outputs are given in more detail in G0600718B. They include the development of the major global repository of samples and data for genomic epidemiology studies of malaria; and large-scale GWAS and genome sequencing data generation for host, parasite and vector. Examples relevant to this grant: 1. The world's largest repository of DNA samples and clinical data for genetic studies of host-parasite interactions in malaria 2. Publication of the first genome-wide association study of human disease susceptibility in Africa 3. A large multicentre case-control study of severe malaria, representing the largest ongoing genome-wide association study of an infectious disease. In December 2011 we completed genotyping of >1 million SNPs on >20,000 individuals from 10 different populations.
 
Description Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network (MalariaGEN) 
Organisation Sapienza University of Rome
Department Parasitology Sapienza
Country Italy, Italian Republic 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I direct the MalariaGEN Resource Centre (http://www.malariagen.net/). CGGH supports Resource Centre activities, particularly statistics, software engineering, and ethics.
Collaborator Contribution MalariaGEN - the Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network - is a community of more than 100 researchers in 30 countries, working together on projects that require sharing and integration of large amounts of data. MalariaGEN brings together the work of many different partner studies, each of which is led by an independent investigator and has its own scientific objectives. MalariaGEN adds value to partner studies by providing access to genotyping and sequencing technologies, and by providing a framework for sharing and integrating data in consortial and community projects. MalariaGEN provides training and support in genetic data analysis for researchers at partner institutions in malaria-endemic countries. We do this through a data bursary scheme and through an active programme of scientific meetings and training workshops. These activities are supported by the MalariaGEN Resource Centre which has a team of experts in statistics, population genetics and bioinformatics at the Sanger Institute, Oxford University, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and Mahidol University in Bangkok. There are many practical and ethical challenges involved in sharing data across a global network comprising investigators and institutions with great disparities in funding and infrastructure. The MalariaGEN community has been working to develop transparent procedures for ethics and governance. We have a governance committee and an independent data access committee, and network policies have been defined for data sharing and data access.
Impact See www.malariagen.net. Outputs are given in more detail in G0600718B. They include the development of the major global repository of samples and data for genomic epidemiology studies of malaria; and large-scale GWAS and genome sequencing data generation for host, parasite and vector. Examples relevant to this grant: 1. The world's largest repository of DNA samples and clinical data for genetic studies of host-parasite interactions in malaria 2. Publication of the first genome-wide association study of human disease susceptibility in Africa 3. A large multicentre case-control study of severe malaria, representing the largest ongoing genome-wide association study of an infectious disease. In December 2011 we completed genotyping of >1 million SNPs on >20,000 individuals from 10 different populations.
 
Description Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network (MalariaGEN) 
Organisation The Wellcome Trust Ltd
Department KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research Programme
Country Kenya, Republic of 
Sector Multiple 
PI Contribution I direct the MalariaGEN Resource Centre (http://www.malariagen.net/). CGGH supports Resource Centre activities, particularly statistics, software engineering, and ethics.
Collaborator Contribution MalariaGEN - the Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network - is a community of more than 100 researchers in 30 countries, working together on projects that require sharing and integration of large amounts of data. MalariaGEN brings together the work of many different partner studies, each of which is led by an independent investigator and has its own scientific objectives. MalariaGEN adds value to partner studies by providing access to genotyping and sequencing technologies, and by providing a framework for sharing and integrating data in consortial and community projects. MalariaGEN provides training and support in genetic data analysis for researchers at partner institutions in malaria-endemic countries. We do this through a data bursary scheme and through an active programme of scientific meetings and training workshops. These activities are supported by the MalariaGEN Resource Centre which has a team of experts in statistics, population genetics and bioinformatics at the Sanger Institute, Oxford University, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and Mahidol University in Bangkok. There are many practical and ethical challenges involved in sharing data across a global network comprising investigators and institutions with great disparities in funding and infrastructure. The MalariaGEN community has been working to develop transparent procedures for ethics and governance. We have a governance committee and an independent data access committee, and network policies have been defined for data sharing and data access.
Impact See www.malariagen.net. Outputs are given in more detail in G0600718B. They include the development of the major global repository of samples and data for genomic epidemiology studies of malaria; and large-scale GWAS and genome sequencing data generation for host, parasite and vector. Examples relevant to this grant: 1. The world's largest repository of DNA samples and clinical data for genetic studies of host-parasite interactions in malaria 2. Publication of the first genome-wide association study of human disease susceptibility in Africa 3. A large multicentre case-control study of severe malaria, representing the largest ongoing genome-wide association study of an infectious disease. In December 2011 we completed genotyping of >1 million SNPs on >20,000 individuals from 10 different populations.
 
Description Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network (MalariaGEN) 
Organisation The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution I direct the MalariaGEN Resource Centre (http://www.malariagen.net/). CGGH supports Resource Centre activities, particularly statistics, software engineering, and ethics.
Collaborator Contribution MalariaGEN - the Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network - is a community of more than 100 researchers in 30 countries, working together on projects that require sharing and integration of large amounts of data. MalariaGEN brings together the work of many different partner studies, each of which is led by an independent investigator and has its own scientific objectives. MalariaGEN adds value to partner studies by providing access to genotyping and sequencing technologies, and by providing a framework for sharing and integrating data in consortial and community projects. MalariaGEN provides training and support in genetic data analysis for researchers at partner institutions in malaria-endemic countries. We do this through a data bursary scheme and through an active programme of scientific meetings and training workshops. These activities are supported by the MalariaGEN Resource Centre which has a team of experts in statistics, population genetics and bioinformatics at the Sanger Institute, Oxford University, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and Mahidol University in Bangkok. There are many practical and ethical challenges involved in sharing data across a global network comprising investigators and institutions with great disparities in funding and infrastructure. The MalariaGEN community has been working to develop transparent procedures for ethics and governance. We have a governance committee and an independent data access committee, and network policies have been defined for data sharing and data access.
Impact See www.malariagen.net. Outputs are given in more detail in G0600718B. They include the development of the major global repository of samples and data for genomic epidemiology studies of malaria; and large-scale GWAS and genome sequencing data generation for host, parasite and vector. Examples relevant to this grant: 1. The world's largest repository of DNA samples and clinical data for genetic studies of host-parasite interactions in malaria 2. Publication of the first genome-wide association study of human disease susceptibility in Africa 3. A large multicentre case-control study of severe malaria, representing the largest ongoing genome-wide association study of an infectious disease. In December 2011 we completed genotyping of >1 million SNPs on >20,000 individuals from 10 different populations.
 
Description Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network (MalariaGEN) 
Organisation University of Bamako
Department Malaria Research and Training Centre (MRTC) Bamako
Country Mali, Republic of 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I direct the MalariaGEN Resource Centre (http://www.malariagen.net/). CGGH supports Resource Centre activities, particularly statistics, software engineering, and ethics.
Collaborator Contribution MalariaGEN - the Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network - is a community of more than 100 researchers in 30 countries, working together on projects that require sharing and integration of large amounts of data. MalariaGEN brings together the work of many different partner studies, each of which is led by an independent investigator and has its own scientific objectives. MalariaGEN adds value to partner studies by providing access to genotyping and sequencing technologies, and by providing a framework for sharing and integrating data in consortial and community projects. MalariaGEN provides training and support in genetic data analysis for researchers at partner institutions in malaria-endemic countries. We do this through a data bursary scheme and through an active programme of scientific meetings and training workshops. These activities are supported by the MalariaGEN Resource Centre which has a team of experts in statistics, population genetics and bioinformatics at the Sanger Institute, Oxford University, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and Mahidol University in Bangkok. There are many practical and ethical challenges involved in sharing data across a global network comprising investigators and institutions with great disparities in funding and infrastructure. The MalariaGEN community has been working to develop transparent procedures for ethics and governance. We have a governance committee and an independent data access committee, and network policies have been defined for data sharing and data access.
Impact See www.malariagen.net. Outputs are given in more detail in G0600718B. They include the development of the major global repository of samples and data for genomic epidemiology studies of malaria; and large-scale GWAS and genome sequencing data generation for host, parasite and vector. Examples relevant to this grant: 1. The world's largest repository of DNA samples and clinical data for genetic studies of host-parasite interactions in malaria 2. Publication of the first genome-wide association study of human disease susceptibility in Africa 3. A large multicentre case-control study of severe malaria, representing the largest ongoing genome-wide association study of an infectious disease. In December 2011 we completed genotyping of >1 million SNPs on >20,000 individuals from 10 different populations.
 
Description Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network (MalariaGEN) 
Organisation University of Buea
Country Cameroon, Republic of 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I direct the MalariaGEN Resource Centre (http://www.malariagen.net/). CGGH supports Resource Centre activities, particularly statistics, software engineering, and ethics.
Collaborator Contribution MalariaGEN - the Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network - is a community of more than 100 researchers in 30 countries, working together on projects that require sharing and integration of large amounts of data. MalariaGEN brings together the work of many different partner studies, each of which is led by an independent investigator and has its own scientific objectives. MalariaGEN adds value to partner studies by providing access to genotyping and sequencing technologies, and by providing a framework for sharing and integrating data in consortial and community projects. MalariaGEN provides training and support in genetic data analysis for researchers at partner institutions in malaria-endemic countries. We do this through a data bursary scheme and through an active programme of scientific meetings and training workshops. These activities are supported by the MalariaGEN Resource Centre which has a team of experts in statistics, population genetics and bioinformatics at the Sanger Institute, Oxford University, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and Mahidol University in Bangkok. There are many practical and ethical challenges involved in sharing data across a global network comprising investigators and institutions with great disparities in funding and infrastructure. The MalariaGEN community has been working to develop transparent procedures for ethics and governance. We have a governance committee and an independent data access committee, and network policies have been defined for data sharing and data access.
Impact See www.malariagen.net. Outputs are given in more detail in G0600718B. They include the development of the major global repository of samples and data for genomic epidemiology studies of malaria; and large-scale GWAS and genome sequencing data generation for host, parasite and vector. Examples relevant to this grant: 1. The world's largest repository of DNA samples and clinical data for genetic studies of host-parasite interactions in malaria 2. Publication of the first genome-wide association study of human disease susceptibility in Africa 3. A large multicentre case-control study of severe malaria, representing the largest ongoing genome-wide association study of an infectious disease. In December 2011 we completed genotyping of >1 million SNPs on >20,000 individuals from 10 different populations.
 
Description Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network (MalariaGEN) 
Organisation University of Colombo
Department Department of Parasitology
Country Sri Lanka, Democratic Socialist Republic of 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I direct the MalariaGEN Resource Centre (http://www.malariagen.net/). CGGH supports Resource Centre activities, particularly statistics, software engineering, and ethics.
Collaborator Contribution MalariaGEN - the Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network - is a community of more than 100 researchers in 30 countries, working together on projects that require sharing and integration of large amounts of data. MalariaGEN brings together the work of many different partner studies, each of which is led by an independent investigator and has its own scientific objectives. MalariaGEN adds value to partner studies by providing access to genotyping and sequencing technologies, and by providing a framework for sharing and integrating data in consortial and community projects. MalariaGEN provides training and support in genetic data analysis for researchers at partner institutions in malaria-endemic countries. We do this through a data bursary scheme and through an active programme of scientific meetings and training workshops. These activities are supported by the MalariaGEN Resource Centre which has a team of experts in statistics, population genetics and bioinformatics at the Sanger Institute, Oxford University, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and Mahidol University in Bangkok. There are many practical and ethical challenges involved in sharing data across a global network comprising investigators and institutions with great disparities in funding and infrastructure. The MalariaGEN community has been working to develop transparent procedures for ethics and governance. We have a governance committee and an independent data access committee, and network policies have been defined for data sharing and data access.
Impact See www.malariagen.net. Outputs are given in more detail in G0600718B. They include the development of the major global repository of samples and data for genomic epidemiology studies of malaria; and large-scale GWAS and genome sequencing data generation for host, parasite and vector. Examples relevant to this grant: 1. The world's largest repository of DNA samples and clinical data for genetic studies of host-parasite interactions in malaria 2. Publication of the first genome-wide association study of human disease susceptibility in Africa 3. A large multicentre case-control study of severe malaria, representing the largest ongoing genome-wide association study of an infectious disease. In December 2011 we completed genotyping of >1 million SNPs on >20,000 individuals from 10 different populations.
 
Description Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network (MalariaGEN) 
Organisation University of Malawi
Country Malawi, Republic of 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I direct the MalariaGEN Resource Centre (http://www.malariagen.net/). CGGH supports Resource Centre activities, particularly statistics, software engineering, and ethics.
Collaborator Contribution MalariaGEN - the Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network - is a community of more than 100 researchers in 30 countries, working together on projects that require sharing and integration of large amounts of data. MalariaGEN brings together the work of many different partner studies, each of which is led by an independent investigator and has its own scientific objectives. MalariaGEN adds value to partner studies by providing access to genotyping and sequencing technologies, and by providing a framework for sharing and integrating data in consortial and community projects. MalariaGEN provides training and support in genetic data analysis for researchers at partner institutions in malaria-endemic countries. We do this through a data bursary scheme and through an active programme of scientific meetings and training workshops. These activities are supported by the MalariaGEN Resource Centre which has a team of experts in statistics, population genetics and bioinformatics at the Sanger Institute, Oxford University, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and Mahidol University in Bangkok. There are many practical and ethical challenges involved in sharing data across a global network comprising investigators and institutions with great disparities in funding and infrastructure. The MalariaGEN community has been working to develop transparent procedures for ethics and governance. We have a governance committee and an independent data access committee, and network policies have been defined for data sharing and data access.
Impact See www.malariagen.net. Outputs are given in more detail in G0600718B. They include the development of the major global repository of samples and data for genomic epidemiology studies of malaria; and large-scale GWAS and genome sequencing data generation for host, parasite and vector. Examples relevant to this grant: 1. The world's largest repository of DNA samples and clinical data for genetic studies of host-parasite interactions in malaria 2. Publication of the first genome-wide association study of human disease susceptibility in Africa 3. A large multicentre case-control study of severe malaria, representing the largest ongoing genome-wide association study of an infectious disease. In December 2011 we completed genotyping of >1 million SNPs on >20,000 individuals from 10 different populations.
 
Description Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network (MalariaGEN) 
Organisation University of Maryland School of Medicine
Department Centre for Vaccine Development (CVD)
Country United States of America 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I direct the MalariaGEN Resource Centre (http://www.malariagen.net/). CGGH supports Resource Centre activities, particularly statistics, software engineering, and ethics.
Collaborator Contribution MalariaGEN - the Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network - is a community of more than 100 researchers in 30 countries, working together on projects that require sharing and integration of large amounts of data. MalariaGEN brings together the work of many different partner studies, each of which is led by an independent investigator and has its own scientific objectives. MalariaGEN adds value to partner studies by providing access to genotyping and sequencing technologies, and by providing a framework for sharing and integrating data in consortial and community projects. MalariaGEN provides training and support in genetic data analysis for researchers at partner institutions in malaria-endemic countries. We do this through a data bursary scheme and through an active programme of scientific meetings and training workshops. These activities are supported by the MalariaGEN Resource Centre which has a team of experts in statistics, population genetics and bioinformatics at the Sanger Institute, Oxford University, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and Mahidol University in Bangkok. There are many practical and ethical challenges involved in sharing data across a global network comprising investigators and institutions with great disparities in funding and infrastructure. The MalariaGEN community has been working to develop transparent procedures for ethics and governance. We have a governance committee and an independent data access committee, and network policies have been defined for data sharing and data access.
Impact See www.malariagen.net. Outputs are given in more detail in G0600718B. They include the development of the major global repository of samples and data for genomic epidemiology studies of malaria; and large-scale GWAS and genome sequencing data generation for host, parasite and vector. Examples relevant to this grant: 1. The world's largest repository of DNA samples and clinical data for genetic studies of host-parasite interactions in malaria 2. Publication of the first genome-wide association study of human disease susceptibility in Africa 3. A large multicentre case-control study of severe malaria, representing the largest ongoing genome-wide association study of an infectious disease. In December 2011 we completed genotyping of >1 million SNPs on >20,000 individuals from 10 different populations.
 
Description Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network (MalariaGEN) 
Organisation University of Michigan
Country United States of America 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I direct the MalariaGEN Resource Centre (http://www.malariagen.net/). CGGH supports Resource Centre activities, particularly statistics, software engineering, and ethics.
Collaborator Contribution MalariaGEN - the Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network - is a community of more than 100 researchers in 30 countries, working together on projects that require sharing and integration of large amounts of data. MalariaGEN brings together the work of many different partner studies, each of which is led by an independent investigator and has its own scientific objectives. MalariaGEN adds value to partner studies by providing access to genotyping and sequencing technologies, and by providing a framework for sharing and integrating data in consortial and community projects. MalariaGEN provides training and support in genetic data analysis for researchers at partner institutions in malaria-endemic countries. We do this through a data bursary scheme and through an active programme of scientific meetings and training workshops. These activities are supported by the MalariaGEN Resource Centre which has a team of experts in statistics, population genetics and bioinformatics at the Sanger Institute, Oxford University, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and Mahidol University in Bangkok. There are many practical and ethical challenges involved in sharing data across a global network comprising investigators and institutions with great disparities in funding and infrastructure. The MalariaGEN community has been working to develop transparent procedures for ethics and governance. We have a governance committee and an independent data access committee, and network policies have been defined for data sharing and data access.
Impact See www.malariagen.net. Outputs are given in more detail in G0600718B. They include the development of the major global repository of samples and data for genomic epidemiology studies of malaria; and large-scale GWAS and genome sequencing data generation for host, parasite and vector. Examples relevant to this grant: 1. The world's largest repository of DNA samples and clinical data for genetic studies of host-parasite interactions in malaria 2. Publication of the first genome-wide association study of human disease susceptibility in Africa 3. A large multicentre case-control study of severe malaria, representing the largest ongoing genome-wide association study of an infectious disease. In December 2011 we completed genotyping of >1 million SNPs on >20,000 individuals from 10 different populations.
 
Description Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network (MalariaGEN) 
Organisation University of Stockholm
Country Sweden, Kingdom of 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I direct the MalariaGEN Resource Centre (http://www.malariagen.net/). CGGH supports Resource Centre activities, particularly statistics, software engineering, and ethics.
Collaborator Contribution MalariaGEN - the Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network - is a community of more than 100 researchers in 30 countries, working together on projects that require sharing and integration of large amounts of data. MalariaGEN brings together the work of many different partner studies, each of which is led by an independent investigator and has its own scientific objectives. MalariaGEN adds value to partner studies by providing access to genotyping and sequencing technologies, and by providing a framework for sharing and integrating data in consortial and community projects. MalariaGEN provides training and support in genetic data analysis for researchers at partner institutions in malaria-endemic countries. We do this through a data bursary scheme and through an active programme of scientific meetings and training workshops. These activities are supported by the MalariaGEN Resource Centre which has a team of experts in statistics, population genetics and bioinformatics at the Sanger Institute, Oxford University, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and Mahidol University in Bangkok. There are many practical and ethical challenges involved in sharing data across a global network comprising investigators and institutions with great disparities in funding and infrastructure. The MalariaGEN community has been working to develop transparent procedures for ethics and governance. We have a governance committee and an independent data access committee, and network policies have been defined for data sharing and data access.
Impact See www.malariagen.net. Outputs are given in more detail in G0600718B. They include the development of the major global repository of samples and data for genomic epidemiology studies of malaria; and large-scale GWAS and genome sequencing data generation for host, parasite and vector. Examples relevant to this grant: 1. The world's largest repository of DNA samples and clinical data for genetic studies of host-parasite interactions in malaria 2. Publication of the first genome-wide association study of human disease susceptibility in Africa 3. A large multicentre case-control study of severe malaria, representing the largest ongoing genome-wide association study of an infectious disease. In December 2011 we completed genotyping of >1 million SNPs on >20,000 individuals from 10 different populations.
 
Description Plasmodium Diversity Network Africa 
Organisation Addis Ababa University
Department Aklilu Lemma Institute of Pathobiology
Country Ethiopia, Federal Democratic Republic of 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution CGGH has provided small starter grants to PDNA, in part by MRC Centenary Award, as part of our mission to support the training and capacity development of early career African scientists. CGGH continues to support PDNA is various ways including supporting training and providing mentor ship.
Collaborator Contribution The Plasmodium Diversity Network Africa (PDNA) is a partnership of African scientists working together to determine the diversity of the malaria parasite in sub-Saharan Africa and by using this data, inform malaria control policy. PDNA members are leading research programmes in their own contexts and are part of the training and capacity development of early career African scientists.
Impact Since established there are two PDNA led publications and £5m grant funding through the Wellcome Trust Developing Excellence in Leadership, Training and Science Initiative.
Start Year 2013
 
Description Plasmodium Diversity Network Africa 
Organisation Congo National Institute of Biomedical Research (Institut National de Recherche Biomédicale)
Country Congo, Democratic Republic of the 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution CGGH has provided small starter grants to PDNA, in part by MRC Centenary Award, as part of our mission to support the training and capacity development of early career African scientists. CGGH continues to support PDNA is various ways including supporting training and providing mentor ship.
Collaborator Contribution The Plasmodium Diversity Network Africa (PDNA) is a partnership of African scientists working together to determine the diversity of the malaria parasite in sub-Saharan Africa and by using this data, inform malaria control policy. PDNA members are leading research programmes in their own contexts and are part of the training and capacity development of early career African scientists.
Impact Since established there are two PDNA led publications and £5m grant funding through the Wellcome Trust Developing Excellence in Leadership, Training and Science Initiative.
Start Year 2013
 
Description Plasmodium Diversity Network Africa 
Organisation Cote D'Ivoire's National Institute of Public Health
Department Malaria Research and Control Centre
Country Cote d'Ivoire, Republic of 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution CGGH has provided small starter grants to PDNA, in part by MRC Centenary Award, as part of our mission to support the training and capacity development of early career African scientists. CGGH continues to support PDNA is various ways including supporting training and providing mentor ship.
Collaborator Contribution The Plasmodium Diversity Network Africa (PDNA) is a partnership of African scientists working together to determine the diversity of the malaria parasite in sub-Saharan Africa and by using this data, inform malaria control policy. PDNA members are leading research programmes in their own contexts and are part of the training and capacity development of early career African scientists.
Impact Since established there are two PDNA led publications and £5m grant funding through the Wellcome Trust Developing Excellence in Leadership, Training and Science Initiative.
Start Year 2013
 
Description Plasmodium Diversity Network Africa 
Organisation Medical Research Council (MRC)
Department MRC Unit, The Gambia
Country Gambia, Republic of the 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution CGGH has provided small starter grants to PDNA, in part by MRC Centenary Award, as part of our mission to support the training and capacity development of early career African scientists. CGGH continues to support PDNA is various ways including supporting training and providing mentor ship.
Collaborator Contribution The Plasmodium Diversity Network Africa (PDNA) is a partnership of African scientists working together to determine the diversity of the malaria parasite in sub-Saharan Africa and by using this data, inform malaria control policy. PDNA members are leading research programmes in their own contexts and are part of the training and capacity development of early career African scientists.
Impact Since established there are two PDNA led publications and £5m grant funding through the Wellcome Trust Developing Excellence in Leadership, Training and Science Initiative.
Start Year 2013
 
Description Plasmodium Diversity Network Africa 
Organisation National Institute for Medical Research, Tanzania
Department NIMR Mbeya Research Centre (Formerly known as; Mbeya Medical Research Programme, MMPR)
Country Tanzania, United Republic of 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution CGGH has provided small starter grants to PDNA, in part by MRC Centenary Award, as part of our mission to support the training and capacity development of early career African scientists. CGGH continues to support PDNA is various ways including supporting training and providing mentor ship.
Collaborator Contribution The Plasmodium Diversity Network Africa (PDNA) is a partnership of African scientists working together to determine the diversity of the malaria parasite in sub-Saharan Africa and by using this data, inform malaria control policy. PDNA members are leading research programmes in their own contexts and are part of the training and capacity development of early career African scientists.
Impact Since established there are two PDNA led publications and £5m grant funding through the Wellcome Trust Developing Excellence in Leadership, Training and Science Initiative.
Start Year 2013
 
Description Plasmodium Diversity Network Africa 
Organisation Navrongo Health Research Centre (NHRC)
Country Ghana, Republic of 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution CGGH has provided small starter grants to PDNA, in part by MRC Centenary Award, as part of our mission to support the training and capacity development of early career African scientists. CGGH continues to support PDNA is various ways including supporting training and providing mentor ship.
Collaborator Contribution The Plasmodium Diversity Network Africa (PDNA) is a partnership of African scientists working together to determine the diversity of the malaria parasite in sub-Saharan Africa and by using this data, inform malaria control policy. PDNA members are leading research programmes in their own contexts and are part of the training and capacity development of early career African scientists.
Impact Since established there are two PDNA led publications and £5m grant funding through the Wellcome Trust Developing Excellence in Leadership, Training and Science Initiative.
Start Year 2013
 
Description Plasmodium Diversity Network Africa 
Organisation Noguchi Memorial Institute for Medical Research (NMRR)
Country Ghana, Republic of 
Sector Learned Society 
PI Contribution CGGH has provided small starter grants to PDNA, in part by MRC Centenary Award, as part of our mission to support the training and capacity development of early career African scientists. CGGH continues to support PDNA is various ways including supporting training and providing mentor ship.
Collaborator Contribution The Plasmodium Diversity Network Africa (PDNA) is a partnership of African scientists working together to determine the diversity of the malaria parasite in sub-Saharan Africa and by using this data, inform malaria control policy. PDNA members are leading research programmes in their own contexts and are part of the training and capacity development of early career African scientists.
Impact Since established there are two PDNA led publications and £5m grant funding through the Wellcome Trust Developing Excellence in Leadership, Training and Science Initiative.
Start Year 2013
 
Description Plasmodium Diversity Network Africa 
Organisation Pasteur Institute of Madagascar
Country Madagascar, Republic of 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution CGGH has provided small starter grants to PDNA, in part by MRC Centenary Award, as part of our mission to support the training and capacity development of early career African scientists. CGGH continues to support PDNA is various ways including supporting training and providing mentor ship.
Collaborator Contribution The Plasmodium Diversity Network Africa (PDNA) is a partnership of African scientists working together to determine the diversity of the malaria parasite in sub-Saharan Africa and by using this data, inform malaria control policy. PDNA members are leading research programmes in their own contexts and are part of the training and capacity development of early career African scientists.
Impact Since established there are two PDNA led publications and £5m grant funding through the Wellcome Trust Developing Excellence in Leadership, Training and Science Initiative.
Start Year 2013
 
Description Plasmodium Diversity Network Africa 
Organisation University of Bamako
Department Malaria Research and Training Centre (MRTC) Bamako
Country Mali, Republic of 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution CGGH has provided small starter grants to PDNA, in part by MRC Centenary Award, as part of our mission to support the training and capacity development of early career African scientists. CGGH continues to support PDNA is various ways including supporting training and providing mentor ship.
Collaborator Contribution The Plasmodium Diversity Network Africa (PDNA) is a partnership of African scientists working together to determine the diversity of the malaria parasite in sub-Saharan Africa and by using this data, inform malaria control policy. PDNA members are leading research programmes in their own contexts and are part of the training and capacity development of early career African scientists.
Impact Since established there are two PDNA led publications and £5m grant funding through the Wellcome Trust Developing Excellence in Leadership, Training and Science Initiative.
Start Year 2013
 
Description Plasmodium Diversity Network Africa 
Organisation University of Buea
Department Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology
Country Cameroon, Republic of 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution CGGH has provided small starter grants to PDNA, in part by MRC Centenary Award, as part of our mission to support the training and capacity development of early career African scientists. CGGH continues to support PDNA is various ways including supporting training and providing mentor ship.
Collaborator Contribution The Plasmodium Diversity Network Africa (PDNA) is a partnership of African scientists working together to determine the diversity of the malaria parasite in sub-Saharan Africa and by using this data, inform malaria control policy. PDNA members are leading research programmes in their own contexts and are part of the training and capacity development of early career African scientists.
Impact Since established there are two PDNA led publications and £5m grant funding through the Wellcome Trust Developing Excellence in Leadership, Training and Science Initiative.
Start Year 2013
 
Description Plasmodium Diversity Network Africa 
Organisation Université des Sciences de la Santé, Gabon
Country Gabon, Gabonese Republic 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution CGGH has provided small starter grants to PDNA, in part by MRC Centenary Award, as part of our mission to support the training and capacity development of early career African scientists. CGGH continues to support PDNA is various ways including supporting training and providing mentor ship.
Collaborator Contribution The Plasmodium Diversity Network Africa (PDNA) is a partnership of African scientists working together to determine the diversity of the malaria parasite in sub-Saharan Africa and by using this data, inform malaria control policy. PDNA members are leading research programmes in their own contexts and are part of the training and capacity development of early career African scientists.
Impact Since established there are two PDNA led publications and £5m grant funding through the Wellcome Trust Developing Excellence in Leadership, Training and Science Initiative.
Start Year 2013
 
Description Tracking Resistance to Artemisinin Collaboration 
Organisation The Wellcome Trust Ltd
Department Mahidol University-Oxford Tropical Medicine Research Programme
Country Thailand, Kingdom of 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The TRAC (Tracking Resistance to Artemisinins Collaboration) study is coordinating prospective clinical and parasitological studies to assess artemisinin susceptibility in 1500 patients in 15 sites across Asia and Africa. This series of studies will provide well characterized malaria parasites with defined parasite clearance profiles for laboratory and molecular characterization, giving us a unique opportunity to identify a molecular marker of artemisinin resistance and validate an accurate laboratory test to detect resistance. The MRC Centre for Genomics and Global Health is supporting TRAC to perform a genome-wide association study of genetic correlates of delayed parasite clearance, based on genome sequencing of parasites in clinical samples. Initial work is focusing on establishing systems to manage the hundreds of terabytes of raw sequence data generated by this project. Also implementing a process of discovering and validating novel SNPs and other forms of genome variation in these samples, primarily based on alignment to the P.falciparum reference genome but also employing new methods of de-novo genome assembly that are currently under development. Having constructed a comprehensive catalogue of both novel and previously-reported variants, we will carry out genotyping of each sample, using statistical methods for quality assurance that have been validated using independent benchmarks. Having determined genotypes for each sample, we will carry out analyses of genetic association with the clinical phenotype. The aim of this project is that the results will be shared with the research community through user-friendly web tools that will allow scientists and public health authorities to navigate the massive quantities of information generated by the TRAC project.
Collaborator Contribution see above
Impact This project is at an early stage. We have already released genome sequence data on 1000 P. falciparum samples.
Start Year 2011
 
Description UKCRC Modernising Medical Microbiology consortium 
Organisation Oxford Radcliffe Hospitals NHS Trust
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution We have contributed to the development of web informatics tools for the Modernising Medical Microbiology Consortium. This follows on from work funded by this MRC grant to develop the MapSeq web application for population-level analysis of genome variation in parasites and pathogens.
Collaborator Contribution See above
Impact Web application is in development
Start Year 2009
 
Description UKCRC Modernising Medical Microbiology consortium 
Organisation Public Health England (formerly: Health Protection Agency)
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution We have contributed to the development of web informatics tools for the Modernising Medical Microbiology Consortium. This follows on from work funded by this MRC grant to develop the MapSeq web application for population-level analysis of genome variation in parasites and pathogens.
Collaborator Contribution See above
Impact Web application is in development
Start Year 2009
 
Description UKCRC Modernising Medical Microbiology consortium 
Organisation The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution We have contributed to the development of web informatics tools for the Modernising Medical Microbiology Consortium. This follows on from work funded by this MRC grant to develop the MapSeq web application for population-level analysis of genome variation in parasites and pathogens.
Collaborator Contribution See above
Impact Web application is in development
Start Year 2009
 
Description UKCRC Modernising Medical Microbiology consortium 
Organisation University of Oxford
Department Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We have contributed to the development of web informatics tools for the Modernising Medical Microbiology Consortium. This follows on from work funded by this MRC grant to develop the MapSeq web application for population-level analysis of genome variation in parasites and pathogens.
Collaborator Contribution See above
Impact Web application is in development
Start Year 2009
 
Description Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute 
Organisation The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution As head of the Malaria Programme and the Global Health Strategy Group at the Sanger Institute, I'm engaged in all levels of work - scientific, strategic and operational.
Collaborator Contribution The Sanger Institute provides infrastructure, resources and expertise in large-scale genome sequencing, genome-wide SNP typing, informatics and functional genomics.
Impact Examples relevant to this grant: 1. The world's largest repository of DNA samples and clinical data for genetic studies of host-parasite interactions in malaria 2. Publication of the first genome-wide association study of human disease susceptibility in Africa 3. A large multicentre case-control study of severe malaria, representing the largest ongoing genome-wide association study of an infectious disease. In December 2011 we completed genotyping of >1 million SNPs on >20,000 individuals from 10 different populations.
Start Year 2006
 
Description WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network 
Organisation Charles Darwin University (CDU)
Department Menzies School of Health Research
Country Australia, Commonwealth of 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution As the Head of Informatics, I provide leadership to the team developing the open-source, web-based informatics tools that underpin WWARN's data sharing and analysis, as well as providing data visualisations that make core findings available open access. This builds on work funded by a previous MRC grant that contributed to the Topheno web application for integration of clinical and epidemiological data across global research networks.
Collaborator Contribution WWARN provides high-quality data resources, customised research tools and services, and a global platform for exchanging scientific and public health information on malaria drug resistance. Since its formation WWARN has grown into a multidisciplinary, global data sharing network with more than 150 collaborators, bringing together researchers, clinicians, and public health professionals.
Impact The following points outline some of the key outputs that have resulted. Developed and deployed a data submission system that accepts clinical, molecular, pharmacological and in vitro data in any format. Designed and built a a sophisticated data repository that stores and connects the different types of data. Built an interactive tool, WWARN Explorer to visualise data relating to antimalarial resistance. Designed and developed the Molecular Surveyor, an interactive map summarising the location and incidence of molecular markers of sulphadoxine pyrimethamine resistance in Plasmodium falciparum dhfr and dhps genes compiled from peer-reviewed publications. Designed and developed the Antimalarial Quality (AQ) Surveyor, a data visualisation tool that tabulates and maps reports of antimalarial quality with summary data for individual surveys. Led the initial design and hosting for the WWARN website.
Start Year 2008
 
Description WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network 
Organisation University of Cape Town
Country South Africa, Republic of 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution As the Head of Informatics, I provide leadership to the team developing the open-source, web-based informatics tools that underpin WWARN's data sharing and analysis, as well as providing data visualisations that make core findings available open access. This builds on work funded by a previous MRC grant that contributed to the Topheno web application for integration of clinical and epidemiological data across global research networks.
Collaborator Contribution WWARN provides high-quality data resources, customised research tools and services, and a global platform for exchanging scientific and public health information on malaria drug resistance. Since its formation WWARN has grown into a multidisciplinary, global data sharing network with more than 150 collaborators, bringing together researchers, clinicians, and public health professionals.
Impact The following points outline some of the key outputs that have resulted. Developed and deployed a data submission system that accepts clinical, molecular, pharmacological and in vitro data in any format. Designed and built a a sophisticated data repository that stores and connects the different types of data. Built an interactive tool, WWARN Explorer to visualise data relating to antimalarial resistance. Designed and developed the Molecular Surveyor, an interactive map summarising the location and incidence of molecular markers of sulphadoxine pyrimethamine resistance in Plasmodium falciparum dhfr and dhps genes compiled from peer-reviewed publications. Designed and developed the Antimalarial Quality (AQ) Surveyor, a data visualisation tool that tabulates and maps reports of antimalarial quality with summary data for individual surveys. Led the initial design and hosting for the WWARN website.
Start Year 2008
 
Description WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network 
Organisation University of Maryland
Country United States of America 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution As the Head of Informatics, I provide leadership to the team developing the open-source, web-based informatics tools that underpin WWARN's data sharing and analysis, as well as providing data visualisations that make core findings available open access. This builds on work funded by a previous MRC grant that contributed to the Topheno web application for integration of clinical and epidemiological data across global research networks.
Collaborator Contribution WWARN provides high-quality data resources, customised research tools and services, and a global platform for exchanging scientific and public health information on malaria drug resistance. Since its formation WWARN has grown into a multidisciplinary, global data sharing network with more than 150 collaborators, bringing together researchers, clinicians, and public health professionals.
Impact The following points outline some of the key outputs that have resulted. Developed and deployed a data submission system that accepts clinical, molecular, pharmacological and in vitro data in any format. Designed and built a a sophisticated data repository that stores and connects the different types of data. Built an interactive tool, WWARN Explorer to visualise data relating to antimalarial resistance. Designed and developed the Molecular Surveyor, an interactive map summarising the location and incidence of molecular markers of sulphadoxine pyrimethamine resistance in Plasmodium falciparum dhfr and dhps genes compiled from peer-reviewed publications. Designed and developed the Antimalarial Quality (AQ) Surveyor, a data visualisation tool that tabulates and maps reports of antimalarial quality with summary data for individual surveys. Led the initial design and hosting for the WWARN website.
Start Year 2008
 
Description WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network 
Organisation University of Oxford
Department Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution As the Head of Informatics, I provide leadership to the team developing the open-source, web-based informatics tools that underpin WWARN's data sharing and analysis, as well as providing data visualisations that make core findings available open access. This builds on work funded by a previous MRC grant that contributed to the Topheno web application for integration of clinical and epidemiological data across global research networks.
Collaborator Contribution WWARN provides high-quality data resources, customised research tools and services, and a global platform for exchanging scientific and public health information on malaria drug resistance. Since its formation WWARN has grown into a multidisciplinary, global data sharing network with more than 150 collaborators, bringing together researchers, clinicians, and public health professionals.
Impact The following points outline some of the key outputs that have resulted. Developed and deployed a data submission system that accepts clinical, molecular, pharmacological and in vitro data in any format. Designed and built a a sophisticated data repository that stores and connects the different types of data. Built an interactive tool, WWARN Explorer to visualise data relating to antimalarial resistance. Designed and developed the Molecular Surveyor, an interactive map summarising the location and incidence of molecular markers of sulphadoxine pyrimethamine resistance in Plasmodium falciparum dhfr and dhps genes compiled from peer-reviewed publications. Designed and developed the Antimalarial Quality (AQ) Surveyor, a data visualisation tool that tabulates and maps reports of antimalarial quality with summary data for individual surveys. Led the initial design and hosting for the WWARN website.
Start Year 2008
 
Description WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network 
Organisation University of Washington
Country United States of America 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution As the Head of Informatics, I provide leadership to the team developing the open-source, web-based informatics tools that underpin WWARN's data sharing and analysis, as well as providing data visualisations that make core findings available open access. This builds on work funded by a previous MRC grant that contributed to the Topheno web application for integration of clinical and epidemiological data across global research networks.
Collaborator Contribution WWARN provides high-quality data resources, customised research tools and services, and a global platform for exchanging scientific and public health information on malaria drug resistance. Since its formation WWARN has grown into a multidisciplinary, global data sharing network with more than 150 collaborators, bringing together researchers, clinicians, and public health professionals.
Impact The following points outline some of the key outputs that have resulted. Developed and deployed a data submission system that accepts clinical, molecular, pharmacological and in vitro data in any format. Designed and built a a sophisticated data repository that stores and connects the different types of data. Built an interactive tool, WWARN Explorer to visualise data relating to antimalarial resistance. Designed and developed the Molecular Surveyor, an interactive map summarising the location and incidence of molecular markers of sulphadoxine pyrimethamine resistance in Plasmodium falciparum dhfr and dhps genes compiled from peer-reviewed publications. Designed and developed the Antimalarial Quality (AQ) Surveyor, a data visualisation tool that tabulates and maps reports of antimalarial quality with summary data for individual surveys. Led the initial design and hosting for the WWARN website.
Start Year 2008
 
Description WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network 
Organisation World Health Organization (WHO)
Country Global 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution As the Head of Informatics, I provide leadership to the team developing the open-source, web-based informatics tools that underpin WWARN's data sharing and analysis, as well as providing data visualisations that make core findings available open access. This builds on work funded by a previous MRC grant that contributed to the Topheno web application for integration of clinical and epidemiological data across global research networks.
Collaborator Contribution WWARN provides high-quality data resources, customised research tools and services, and a global platform for exchanging scientific and public health information on malaria drug resistance. Since its formation WWARN has grown into a multidisciplinary, global data sharing network with more than 150 collaborators, bringing together researchers, clinicians, and public health professionals.
Impact The following points outline some of the key outputs that have resulted. Developed and deployed a data submission system that accepts clinical, molecular, pharmacological and in vitro data in any format. Designed and built a a sophisticated data repository that stores and connects the different types of data. Built an interactive tool, WWARN Explorer to visualise data relating to antimalarial resistance. Designed and developed the Molecular Surveyor, an interactive map summarising the location and incidence of molecular markers of sulphadoxine pyrimethamine resistance in Plasmodium falciparum dhfr and dhps genes compiled from peer-reviewed publications. Designed and developed the Antimalarial Quality (AQ) Surveyor, a data visualisation tool that tabulates and maps reports of antimalarial quality with summary data for individual surveys. Led the initial design and hosting for the WWARN website.
Start Year 2008
 
Description Cambodia Manuscript Press Release 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact A press release and associated follow up interviews led to media coverage of 64 stories in 13 languages (mostly in English, 78%); National coverage in 23 countries; High-profile coverage included Wired UK, BBC, The Guardian, FoxNews, AFP. Coverage on twitter included 12 tweets from accounts such as BBC World Service, Times of India, and Agence France Presse reached a combined following of 1.3 million users.

see above
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Radio 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact BBC World Service "The Age of the Genome". Kwiatkowski interviewed by Richard Dawkins.

further media inquiries
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2010
 
Description Various articles in popular media 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Our work has been featured in articles and news items in WIRED, Prospect and Scientific American

further media inquiries
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2009,2010