Cardiff Linked Grant

Lead Research Organisation: Cardiff University
Department Name: School of Physics and Astronomy

Abstract

Previous support from STFC through this PATT grant has enabled Cardiff astronomers to carry out their PI and co-I duties for observing programmes including SCUBA-2 and HARP on JCMT, UKIRT, MMT, ATCA and MOPRA. This support has been crucial in supporting Cardiff's active research goals, ranging from characterizing the most distant known objects in the Universe, a full census of star formation activity in the Galactic Plane, gas and dust in nearby galaxies and investigating dark gas in our nearest neighbour, Andromeda. As well as individual PI projects, Cardiff are also active members of many JCMT Legacy programmes including the JCMT Cosmology Legacy Survey (CLS), SASSY, the Galactic Plane Survey (JPS) and the Gould Belt Survey. Here we propose for continued support to enable Cardiff astronomers to (a) exploit the many Herschel projects which Cardiff leads and require multi-wavelength follow up to understand; (b) support availability of new millimetre instrumentation and (c) continue the use of submillimetre cameras APEX and SMA to carry out investigations of the dusty Universe throughout cosmic history.

Publications


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Coudé S (2016) The JCMT Gould Belt Survey: the effect of molecular contamination in SCUBA-2 observations of Orion A in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society

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Fuller C (2016) H-ATLAS: the far-infrared properties of galaxies in and around the Coma cluster in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society

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Hickinbottom S (2014) A surprising consistency between the far-infrared galaxy luminosity functions of the field and Coma in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society

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Moore T (2015) The JCMT Plane Survey: early results from the l = 30° field in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society


 
Description This support has been crucial in supporting our active research goals, ranging from characterizing the most distant known objects in the Universe, a full census of star formation activity in the Galactic Plane, unusual gas and dust conditions in nearby galaxies, investigating dark gas and dust in Andromeda and finally searching for dark and dim galaxies. We are also active members of many JCMT Legacy programmes which have now completed their observing runs, including the Cosmology Legacy Survey, SASSY, the Galactic Plane Survey and the Gould Belt Survey.

Many of our observational programmes are based on exploiting our successful ALMA and Herschel surveys. These include the Herschel Reference Survey (PI Eales), the Herschel ATLAS (PI Eales, Eales et al 2010, 2015a, 2015b), Andromeda (HELGA, PI Gear, Smith et al 2012a, Ford et al 2013, Kirk et al 2014) and the Herschel Virgo and Fornax Cluster surveys (PI Davies, Davies et al 2010, 2012, 2013, 2014, Fuller et al. 2014). Over the past few years we have developed useful data products including map-making (Pascale et al 2011, Valiante et al in prep), source extraction and the creation of source and photometric catalogues (Smith et al 2012b, Auld et al 2013, Clark et al in 2015) now available to the public. The H-ATLAS has so far produced hundreds of thousands of far-IR sources and more than 70 refereed papers, many led by Cardiff. Follow up programmes are crucial in order to measure the physical characteristics of our unique samples (e.g. redshift, gas mass, star formation rates, metallicity etc.).

Some research highlights from this round include the development by Eales of a method to use lenses to investigate cosmological parameters and test models for the evolution of the distribution of dark-matter haloes (Eales et al 2015a). This led to a successful PI programme on the JCMT in 2014. Eales also led a team that provided the first direct evidence that a large proportion of galaxies have undergone a major metamorphosis, where disc shaped galaxies became spherical (Eales et al 2015b). To do this, multi-wavelength observations of 10,000 galaxies from the Herschel ATLAS and GAMA surveys were compiled. A closer look at nearby galaxies in the Herschel ATLAS led to the discovery of a set of blue, dusty galaxies with highly unusual star formation properties. This has resulted in many proposals submitted to telescopes (2 accepted, 2 under review) in order to try and understand why these sources are atomic gas rich, molecular gas poor but yet still actively forming stars (Clark et al. 2015, de Vis et al in prep, Dunne et al in prep).

Finally, combining ALMA and MOPRA observations, Cardiff astronomers also showed that the formation of massive stars was the result of cloud fragmentation (Peretto et al 2013). Further evidence of the link between forming starless cores and collapsing filaments was revealed in IRAM observations of dense cores (Peretto et al 2014).
Exploitation Route Not appropriate
Sectors Other
 
Description A programme of Astrophysics, Cosmology and Technology in Cardiff 2013-2016
Amount
Funding ID ST/N000706/1 
Organisation Science and Technologies Facilities Council (STFC) 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK)
Start 03/2016 
End 03/2018